Upload
Login or register

The Girl Who Survived Rabies

Click to block a category:GamingPoliticsNewsComicsAnimeOther
 

The girl who survived rabies is about 15 year old, Jeanna Giese, from Wisconsin in the USA, who survived rabies thanks to an innovative and desperate treatment tried out on her by Dr. Rodney Willougby.

His technique involved putting her into a deep coma allowing her body to begin an antibody response to the disease that let Jeanna gradually regained normal function. Subsequent testing of the same technique did not have such good results.

+125
Views: 22722 Submitted: 05/19/2013
Hide Comments
Leave a comment Refresh Comments (29)
> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
User avatar #4 - cykocd
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
I survived rabbis from a bat. Wheres my ******* tv show?
User avatar #13 to #4 - awesomesaucy
Reply +14 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
Rabbi's from a bat aren't deadly. They'll only circumcise you. Rabies however, that will kill you which is why she got the TV show.
User avatar #15 to #13 - spectrethief
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
>Rabbi's

Damn jews...
#28 to #13 - willawesome
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
She got rabies from a bat
#2 - anon id: 924c455b
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
This isn't funny.

Why would you post something on FJ that isn't funny?
Wait, you went one step further, you posted something on funnyjunk you knew was not funny, in fact, you know it is not even intended to be funny.

So the logic here is that you went to a website designed for the sake of material that should be rich in comedic value and posted something that is far far away from what the site is intended for.

Keep this **** for some other websites, as beautiful the story may be, it is the wrong place to post it.
User avatar #8 to #2 - flemsdfer
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
This isn't funny.

Why would you post a comment on FJ that isn't funny?
Wait, you went one step further, you posted a comment on funnyjunk you knew was not funny, in fact, you chose to say it as anon.

So the logic here is that you went to a website designed for the sake of material that should be rich in comedic value and posted a comment that is far far away from what the site is intended for.

Keep this **** for some other websites, as beautiful the comment may be, it is the wrong place to post it.
User avatar #16 to #8 - sodapops
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
Bra-vo.
User avatar #6 to #2 - blargchikahonkhonk
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
majority people on funnyjunk will want to watch something intresting if not there is a next button
User avatar #3 to #2 - Rockaman
Reply +11 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
Because it is very interesting.
#9 to #3 - anon id: ebbd6134
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
shut up
User avatar #10 - superbigfupa
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
About 20 seconds in i see the word "fap" in the clouds
#12 to #10 - iliketheporn
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
By god, you're right!
User avatar #23 - SteyrAUG
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
Are you telling me that instead of just vaccinating the girl, they waited until the rabies had gotten past the point where it could be treated and then tried some crazy ass coma treatment on her?
#27 to #23 - whatwhen
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
**whatwhen rolled a random image posted in comment #616094 at Anime & Manga - anime shows, anime games, anime art, manga ** its difficult to know if you are infected before its too late for vaccinating
but obviously like any sane person if you get bit by some animal better get the god damn shots
User avatar #29 to #23 - gyptice
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
They said they didn't suspect she had rabies, and if you listened to the video, that said that unless you DJ 4DM1Nister the vaccine 24 hours after infection, it's too late for it take effect. Once you show the first symptoms it is too late.
#24 to #23 - curbed
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
Yup, and apparently it worked, at least for her.
User avatar #18 - aldheim
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
I don't get it.
I thought rabies was easily treated since, like, more than a century ago.
User avatar #19 to #18 - arcanesyrge
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
Nope. Of the 4 or so people who catch it a year, its almost certain death. Plague is easily treatable.
User avatar #20 to #19 - arcanesyrge
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
*4 or so people in america
User avatar #21 to #18 - neonblackkitty
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
there are treatments to prevent it. however, once the onset of rabies begins, there is no cure, it's a brain disease
User avatar #14 - unmercifulgod
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
I don't understand what's so "innovative" about the treatment. It's a medically induced coma. Doctors do that **** all the time.
User avatar #22 to #14 - neonblackkitty
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
generally that treatment is to prevent your body from reacting (like to keep swelling in the brain down, or to keep your from damaging your spine while breathing)
#17 - anon id: e28f1009
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
I mean as long as you get treatment within ten days of being bitten, or infection you're fine, if what I found on wikipedia is true. It's really just the parents fault for being a couple of ignorant savages and ignoring a bite from a wild animal without taking her to see a doctor. What a couple of morons, surviving rabies is a big deal when you or your parents are ******* stupid.
#7 - anon id: 6728def1
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
Oh god how horrible. Why FJ? What a terrible disease. Makes me want to get vaccinated just in case...
User avatar #5 - thewinkster
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
This made me really sad seeing the people who where tied to the bed and just waiting to die.
#25 to #5 - curbed
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2013) [-]
That would just be a terrible way to go... I would rather get shot in the head. Considering the brain remains undamaged, I wonder if you're like... aware of what's going on, if you can see that you're restrained and feel your body becoming all contorted like that and yet be able to do nothing about it. I actually think the induced coma they did on the guy was the right thing to do. Even though he didn't survive, he still went more peacefully then what the other people have gone through, he just was put to sleep and didn't wake up.
User avatar #30 to #25 - thewinkster
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/21/2013) [-]
See what I don't get is why not take the time to experiment on the body while they are dieing. If they are for sure going to die why waste the time to wait and not try something. "Because that deeming to the body" Well **** that because if I where in that position I would want someone to find something to help me with the pain and help others in the future. What is the worst the experiments could do? Kill me faster. Wouldn't that be a good thing considering the situation. Maybe there is something i'm missing. Or maybe it goes again'st regulation but rabies is basically the zombie virus we know of today. The subject goes mad. The subject tries to spread the diseases via biting and or transferring body elements. So why not try to do something about the damn **** instead of waiting. I need to do some research.
#31 to #30 - curbed
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/21/2013) [-]
Well, I think mainly because they don't fully understand rabies, how it attacks the body and the brain is still a mystery, even what this guys theory hasn't yet been proven. It's fairly recently that we were able to put someone in such a deep coma and keep them alive. The majority of rabies cases are in developing countries so their resources are limited and since it kills so quickly with such little warning makes it difficult to make arrangements to transfer them to a country with the resources necessary to treat them correctly after that point of no return. The fact that this whole thing worked sheds some light on a very dark area of medicine but there is still a lot that remains a mystery. I'm sure the fact that one girl survived will boost the research on rabies and work towards a development of a treatment. There's one thing I wonder about though. It was mentioned that the virus remains in her body, does that mean that she can still infect others? Like if she happened to somehow get her blood into the system of someone else, would that mean that that person is infected? It's a bit scary to think about.
User avatar #1 - departed
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/19/2013) [-]
Wow just watched the whole thing. Very interesting.