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zeedeveel    

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Date Signed Up:12/02/2010
Last Login:4/16/2014
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latest user's comments

#74 - Sauce? 04/14/2014 on Best use of the force. -1
#41 - Go back to tumblr, ****** .  [+] (1 new reply) 04/13/2014 on Treeko -2
User avatar #55 - kievaughnb (04/14/2014) [-]
The guy he replied to is the one posting shit from the content and getting millions of thumbs so shut the actual fuck up faggot
#13 - ITT: The rednecks of FJ. 04/12/2014 on Monster Jam +3
#96 - No, none can.  [+] (1 new reply) 04/11/2014 on What sucks about mobile site 0
User avatar #97 - instakill (04/11/2014) [-]
seems like I was lied to
#78 - That was on Windows Mobile well before iOS ever came to fruiti… 04/11/2014 on stuff about apple 0
#76 - Oh no, they both used a GUI, an idea both of them stole from a… 04/11/2014 on stuff about apple 0
#120 - Wait... wait... Are those Naruto whiskers? He has all this … 04/11/2014 on (untitled) +1
#55 - Just because you dickbags can't get over it, there's no reason… 04/07/2014 on Legendary Pokemon -1
#205 - Ah, I apologize, that was another conversation in this thread.… 04/07/2014 on titanic +1
#202 - She's since moved her children to another district that requir…  [+] (2 new replies) 04/07/2014 on titanic +2
User avatar #203 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
Who is "she"? Your ex-wife?

To put it bluntly, that's outrageous. You should demand to see their yearly budget, that's within your rights. Also, it doesn't matter if they "can't afford new books", they're still not meeting state requirements (I think... I hope). They'll have to download material of the internet and incorporate it into their current curriculum.
#205 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Ah, I apologize, that was another conversation in this thread. It's another member of our local non-profit that happens to be an Atheist Alliance.

I will take your advice in requesting the opportunity to view their budget though.
#199 - It's more the fact that the schools here refuse to teach evolu…  [+] (4 new replies) 04/07/2014 on titanic +2
User avatar #200 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
No, of course they can't. I'm pretty sure that's illegal as well, because there's a basic curriculum that all schools in the United States have to cover over the course of a students attendance. I'm nearly 100 % sure that evolution is encompassed by this curriculum.

If your children are attending a school that imposes religious dogma and refuses to teach empirical science, then I would withdraw them immediately.

This is coming from a Catholic.
#202 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
She's since moved her children to another district that requires a half hour drive. This is a great inconvenience and the school is claiming that they can't afford new books. This, mind you, is a very wealthy district that just built the stadium equivalent of Thunderdome for a team that wins maybe one game a season.
User avatar #203 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
Who is "she"? Your ex-wife?

To put it bluntly, that's outrageous. You should demand to see their yearly budget, that's within your rights. Also, it doesn't matter if they "can't afford new books", they're still not meeting state requirements (I think... I hope). They'll have to download material of the internet and incorporate it into their current curriculum.
#205 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Ah, I apologize, that was another conversation in this thread. It's another member of our local non-profit that happens to be an Atheist Alliance.

I will take your advice in requesting the opportunity to view their budget though.
#149 - Certainly not as prestigious a university as travelling outsid…  [+] (2 new replies) 04/07/2014 on titanic +2
User avatar #151 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Well, you never told me where you went to school, or where you got your information about the percentage of fundamentalists.
I don't think you understood my comparisons though, I said "something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang." People don't fully understand God or the Big Bang, what is comical about that?
Nonetheless it's late and I'm going to bed, but let me know what you think of Fides et Ratio.
#173 - anonymous (04/07/2014) [-]
According to a 2006 Gallup Poll:

27% of Americans believe religion should have more influence in America.

28% of Americans think the Bible is the actual word of God.

31% of Americans have a favorable view of Christian Fundamentalist religions.


#137 - Yes, Christians don't believe that. Except Christian fundament…  [+] (10 new replies) 04/07/2014 on titanic +2
User avatar #147 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
as a Christian the old testament isn't for today anyway.. the new testament is..
#221 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
Actually, Jesus in the bible says that he has come to not abolish the law, but uphold it. Christians often say this, but its like a 'get out of jail free card' to ignore the horrors of the Old Testament.
User avatar #235 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
but Christians now...like me, believe in the new testament, so it doesn't really matter what the old one said, plus the up said the new testament meets the modern world of today..
but, you don't have to agree cause you can believe what you want I don't care cause in America that's a god given right..
#236 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
You can believe whatever you like, but as I said, Jesus believed in the Old Testament so you can't just cherry pick the parts you like and the parts you don't. If you study the history of the bible and how scientifically flawed it is (not to mention how immoral and demeaning it is) you will cast it side and start to live life as a rational human being.
User avatar #237 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
actually NO. short summary: Jesus coming to die for our sins; saves the day.. boom! be good, and do good and believe in Jesus: boom! heaven and awesome after life..
User avatar #143 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Firstly you should provide these statistics stating that a good portion of Christians are fundamentalist.
Secondly when you say "a couple" that implies you know that there are very few Teachers saying god doesn't exist, but I'd like to know where you figured out an estimate of how many. It's also irrelevant how many teachers do this, it irks me that it happens in my neighborhood.
Third, what college did you go to? Because I'm taking some courses at Dartmouth College and we had some extremely intelligent debate regarding religion and theology.

Lastly what brought me closest to god was reading The Summa Theologiae, as well as Fides et Ratio. They really deepened my understanding of the way people surrender their thoughts to something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang or what gave the first organism life. But in conclusion to quote Thomas Acquinas, “To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.” or in other words, you wouldn't care.
User avatar #185 - lyiat (04/07/2014) [-]
In America, they are. I'm not arguing one way or another, but if you just take a look at the US census, you'll see the breakdown of religions in this country.

73% of all Americans are Christian. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) counts 26,344,933 members of mainline churches versus 39,930,869 members of evangelical Protestant churches. Evangelical is, virtually, synonymous with the word 'fundamentalist', though scholars still debate over the topic. Then you also have the Mormons, another fundamentalist group, counting for another 6.3 million souls, and whatever sect of Roman Catholics, of which I know quite a few personally, that are still fundamentalist.
#149 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Certainly not as prestigious a university as travelling outside of the state of Texas for College requires a bullshit extra tuition charge which sucks considering I was given rather outlandish scholarships only to go to a mid-tier 5A College. I attended several lectures when I was up North at Dartmouth and do envy you for having the opportunity. Texas schools are just shit if you're not a sports fan and I ended up going to a Christian university as it offered the best computer and applied science courses in the state.


I will pick up an ebook of Fides et Ratio (Actually in queue already) but comparing God to the Big Bang is a bit comical. All I'm saying is, if you want to teach your religion in schools, you have your own schools for that. Pushing faith on another person is wrong. Present ideas, let people think for themselves and ultimately just take everything into consideration.

As far as my statement on several Christians being fundamentalists, I only ask you to take a trip to the bible belt of the U.S. It becomes readily apparent.
User avatar #151 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Well, you never told me where you went to school, or where you got your information about the percentage of fundamentalists.
I don't think you understood my comparisons though, I said "something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang." People don't fully understand God or the Big Bang, what is comical about that?
Nonetheless it's late and I'm going to bed, but let me know what you think of Fides et Ratio.
#173 - anonymous (04/07/2014) [-]
According to a 2006 Gallup Poll:

27% of Americans believe religion should have more influence in America.

28% of Americans think the Bible is the actual word of God.

31% of Americans have a favorable view of Christian Fundamentalist religions.


#124 - If you advertise that you will offer a free room strictly to a…  [+] (12 new replies) 04/07/2014 on titanic +2
User avatar #134 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Are you trying to deny that teachers are saying God isn't real? Because they do, look it up. It also doesn't matter that I offer a priest a free night, if you want to take it up with a lawyer go ahead.

www.mtcoolidgemotel.com/
www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Review-g46140-d92185-Reviews-Nordic_Inn_Condominium_Resort-Lincoln_New_Hampshire.html

And nothing in the bible conflicts with science, if you actually understood and interpreted it you would see that, however you probably believe that Christians actually believe God created the world in 7 days and creationism or all those other things which aren't Catholic dogma. But sure, tell me what I have witnessed first hand is wrong, you're not imposing your views or anything.
#137 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Yes, Christians don't believe that. Except Christian fundamentalists which is a huge portion of Christians that fully believe in the creation story, Adam and Eve and all that jazz. If you don't believe it, that's your choice to not adhere to your holy book in that regard but several Christians do. You're not offering a free room to patrons just for being Christian which is the issue here. You're offering an individual a room as a personal favor. The fact that it does pertain to religion is highly irrelevant.


Sure, there have been a couple of outlandish teachers who opted to outright say that God does not exist and that's rude of them as there is no scientific evidence. There's also no scientific evidence that there's not an invisible gerbil floating four meters above my head that can be passed through with great ease but at that point it becomes a burden of proof debate and Christians always hate that one.


I've read the bible and several other holy books. My minor in college was theology and by the end of it all I was pretty well teaching the class because I was the only one who's entire debate wasn't, "Hurrdurr Jesus."


I am interested in your personal experience that brought you closer to God though, these psychosomatic events always give me a good chuckle.
User avatar #147 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
as a Christian the old testament isn't for today anyway.. the new testament is..
#221 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
Actually, Jesus in the bible says that he has come to not abolish the law, but uphold it. Christians often say this, but its like a 'get out of jail free card' to ignore the horrors of the Old Testament.
User avatar #235 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
but Christians now...like me, believe in the new testament, so it doesn't really matter what the old one said, plus the up said the new testament meets the modern world of today..
but, you don't have to agree cause you can believe what you want I don't care cause in America that's a god given right..
#236 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
You can believe whatever you like, but as I said, Jesus believed in the Old Testament so you can't just cherry pick the parts you like and the parts you don't. If you study the history of the bible and how scientifically flawed it is (not to mention how immoral and demeaning it is) you will cast it side and start to live life as a rational human being.
User avatar #237 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
actually NO. short summary: Jesus coming to die for our sins; saves the day.. boom! be good, and do good and believe in Jesus: boom! heaven and awesome after life..
User avatar #143 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Firstly you should provide these statistics stating that a good portion of Christians are fundamentalist.
Secondly when you say "a couple" that implies you know that there are very few Teachers saying god doesn't exist, but I'd like to know where you figured out an estimate of how many. It's also irrelevant how many teachers do this, it irks me that it happens in my neighborhood.
Third, what college did you go to? Because I'm taking some courses at Dartmouth College and we had some extremely intelligent debate regarding religion and theology.

Lastly what brought me closest to god was reading The Summa Theologiae, as well as Fides et Ratio. They really deepened my understanding of the way people surrender their thoughts to something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang or what gave the first organism life. But in conclusion to quote Thomas Acquinas, “To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.” or in other words, you wouldn't care.
User avatar #185 - lyiat (04/07/2014) [-]
In America, they are. I'm not arguing one way or another, but if you just take a look at the US census, you'll see the breakdown of religions in this country.

73% of all Americans are Christian. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) counts 26,344,933 members of mainline churches versus 39,930,869 members of evangelical Protestant churches. Evangelical is, virtually, synonymous with the word 'fundamentalist', though scholars still debate over the topic. Then you also have the Mormons, another fundamentalist group, counting for another 6.3 million souls, and whatever sect of Roman Catholics, of which I know quite a few personally, that are still fundamentalist.
#149 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Certainly not as prestigious a university as travelling outside of the state of Texas for College requires a bullshit extra tuition charge which sucks considering I was given rather outlandish scholarships only to go to a mid-tier 5A College. I attended several lectures when I was up North at Dartmouth and do envy you for having the opportunity. Texas schools are just shit if you're not a sports fan and I ended up going to a Christian university as it offered the best computer and applied science courses in the state.


I will pick up an ebook of Fides et Ratio (Actually in queue already) but comparing God to the Big Bang is a bit comical. All I'm saying is, if you want to teach your religion in schools, you have your own schools for that. Pushing faith on another person is wrong. Present ideas, let people think for themselves and ultimately just take everything into consideration.

As far as my statement on several Christians being fundamentalists, I only ask you to take a trip to the bible belt of the U.S. It becomes readily apparent.
User avatar #151 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Well, you never told me where you went to school, or where you got your information about the percentage of fundamentalists.
I don't think you understood my comparisons though, I said "something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang." People don't fully understand God or the Big Bang, what is comical about that?
Nonetheless it's late and I'm going to bed, but let me know what you think of Fides et Ratio.
#173 - anonymous (04/07/2014) [-]
According to a 2006 Gallup Poll:

27% of Americans believe religion should have more influence in America.

28% of Americans think the Bible is the actual word of God.

31% of Americans have a favorable view of Christian Fundamentalist religions.


#120 - No, this is actually illegal and grounds for civil liberty sui…  [+] (14 new replies) 04/07/2014 on titanic +2
User avatar #122 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Yes, you don't want your children taught religion in school, I understand that.
How is that any different than atheists teaching children that god's not real?
I don't want that forced down my children's throats. And as a matter of fact I offer a free room to any Father or Sister that comes to one of my motels. I'm providing them specials, do you want to sue me over that?
#124 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
If you advertise that you will offer a free room strictly to any religious individual then that is in fact a civil liberties case and I hope someone does address that with you at some point because it is highly illegal.

No one's teaching anyone that God isn't there except in that joke of a movie God's Not Dead. People are just teaching the facts and yes, people are getting more intelligent and realizing, "Hey, these scientific facts don't align with what the bible teach me. Maybe I should question it." The difference in your indoctrination and the one you fear we are making is that ours is unbiased and requires no speculation.
User avatar #134 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Are you trying to deny that teachers are saying God isn't real? Because they do, look it up. It also doesn't matter that I offer a priest a free night, if you want to take it up with a lawyer go ahead.

www.mtcoolidgemotel.com/
www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Review-g46140-d92185-Reviews-Nordic_Inn_Condominium_Resort-Lincoln_New_Hampshire.html

And nothing in the bible conflicts with science, if you actually understood and interpreted it you would see that, however you probably believe that Christians actually believe God created the world in 7 days and creationism or all those other things which aren't Catholic dogma. But sure, tell me what I have witnessed first hand is wrong, you're not imposing your views or anything.
#137 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Yes, Christians don't believe that. Except Christian fundamentalists which is a huge portion of Christians that fully believe in the creation story, Adam and Eve and all that jazz. If you don't believe it, that's your choice to not adhere to your holy book in that regard but several Christians do. You're not offering a free room to patrons just for being Christian which is the issue here. You're offering an individual a room as a personal favor. The fact that it does pertain to religion is highly irrelevant.


Sure, there have been a couple of outlandish teachers who opted to outright say that God does not exist and that's rude of them as there is no scientific evidence. There's also no scientific evidence that there's not an invisible gerbil floating four meters above my head that can be passed through with great ease but at that point it becomes a burden of proof debate and Christians always hate that one.


I've read the bible and several other holy books. My minor in college was theology and by the end of it all I was pretty well teaching the class because I was the only one who's entire debate wasn't, "Hurrdurr Jesus."


I am interested in your personal experience that brought you closer to God though, these psychosomatic events always give me a good chuckle.
User avatar #147 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
as a Christian the old testament isn't for today anyway.. the new testament is..
#221 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
Actually, Jesus in the bible says that he has come to not abolish the law, but uphold it. Christians often say this, but its like a 'get out of jail free card' to ignore the horrors of the Old Testament.
User avatar #235 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
but Christians now...like me, believe in the new testament, so it doesn't really matter what the old one said, plus the up said the new testament meets the modern world of today..
but, you don't have to agree cause you can believe what you want I don't care cause in America that's a god given right..
#236 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
You can believe whatever you like, but as I said, Jesus believed in the Old Testament so you can't just cherry pick the parts you like and the parts you don't. If you study the history of the bible and how scientifically flawed it is (not to mention how immoral and demeaning it is) you will cast it side and start to live life as a rational human being.
User avatar #237 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
actually NO. short summary: Jesus coming to die for our sins; saves the day.. boom! be good, and do good and believe in Jesus: boom! heaven and awesome after life..
User avatar #143 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Firstly you should provide these statistics stating that a good portion of Christians are fundamentalist.
Secondly when you say "a couple" that implies you know that there are very few Teachers saying god doesn't exist, but I'd like to know where you figured out an estimate of how many. It's also irrelevant how many teachers do this, it irks me that it happens in my neighborhood.
Third, what college did you go to? Because I'm taking some courses at Dartmouth College and we had some extremely intelligent debate regarding religion and theology.

Lastly what brought me closest to god was reading The Summa Theologiae, as well as Fides et Ratio. They really deepened my understanding of the way people surrender their thoughts to something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang or what gave the first organism life. But in conclusion to quote Thomas Acquinas, “To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.” or in other words, you wouldn't care.
User avatar #185 - lyiat (04/07/2014) [-]
In America, they are. I'm not arguing one way or another, but if you just take a look at the US census, you'll see the breakdown of religions in this country.

73% of all Americans are Christian. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) counts 26,344,933 members of mainline churches versus 39,930,869 members of evangelical Protestant churches. Evangelical is, virtually, synonymous with the word 'fundamentalist', though scholars still debate over the topic. Then you also have the Mormons, another fundamentalist group, counting for another 6.3 million souls, and whatever sect of Roman Catholics, of which I know quite a few personally, that are still fundamentalist.
#149 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Certainly not as prestigious a university as travelling outside of the state of Texas for College requires a bullshit extra tuition charge which sucks considering I was given rather outlandish scholarships only to go to a mid-tier 5A College. I attended several lectures when I was up North at Dartmouth and do envy you for having the opportunity. Texas schools are just shit if you're not a sports fan and I ended up going to a Christian university as it offered the best computer and applied science courses in the state.


I will pick up an ebook of Fides et Ratio (Actually in queue already) but comparing God to the Big Bang is a bit comical. All I'm saying is, if you want to teach your religion in schools, you have your own schools for that. Pushing faith on another person is wrong. Present ideas, let people think for themselves and ultimately just take everything into consideration.

As far as my statement on several Christians being fundamentalists, I only ask you to take a trip to the bible belt of the U.S. It becomes readily apparent.
User avatar #151 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Well, you never told me where you went to school, or where you got your information about the percentage of fundamentalists.
I don't think you understood my comparisons though, I said "something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang." People don't fully understand God or the Big Bang, what is comical about that?
Nonetheless it's late and I'm going to bed, but let me know what you think of Fides et Ratio.
#173 - anonymous (04/07/2014) [-]
According to a 2006 Gallup Poll:

27% of Americans believe religion should have more influence in America.

28% of Americans think the Bible is the actual word of God.

31% of Americans have a favorable view of Christian Fundamentalist religions.


#117 - Not at all, I live in a rural area where businesses feel it's …  [+] (22 new replies) 04/07/2014 on titanic +2
User avatar #197 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
If you are in the States, then what you're describing is in direct violation of basic civil liberties written in the constitution itself... in the First Amendment. This really only applies to State institutions and legislature, but there are laws based on the principles of the First Amendment passed later that prevent businesses from prioritizing based on one's religious affiliation. There are exceptions though, like if the business is a Christian institution doing Christian work, then "being Christian" actually has a practical impact. Other than that, it's not legal what they're doing.

I don't know what you're so worked up about regarding schools "teaching religion" (in my opinion, you're just as closed-minded for trying to "shield" your children from it, being that it's a huge part of human history whether you like it or not), but regarding businesses, then as I said, that's simple discrimination.
#199 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
It's more the fact that the schools here refuse to teach evolution. The text book from a group member's daughter's class was from 1987 because all of the recent ones taught evolution. They can certainly teach about religion but they can't tell the children, "God created the earth and then Adam and Eve."
User avatar #200 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
No, of course they can't. I'm pretty sure that's illegal as well, because there's a basic curriculum that all schools in the United States have to cover over the course of a students attendance. I'm nearly 100 % sure that evolution is encompassed by this curriculum.

If your children are attending a school that imposes religious dogma and refuses to teach empirical science, then I would withdraw them immediately.

This is coming from a Catholic.
#202 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
She's since moved her children to another district that requires a half hour drive. This is a great inconvenience and the school is claiming that they can't afford new books. This, mind you, is a very wealthy district that just built the stadium equivalent of Thunderdome for a team that wins maybe one game a season.
User avatar #203 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
Who is "she"? Your ex-wife?

To put it bluntly, that's outrageous. You should demand to see their yearly budget, that's within your rights. Also, it doesn't matter if they "can't afford new books", they're still not meeting state requirements (I think... I hope). They'll have to download material of the internet and incorporate it into their current curriculum.
#205 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Ah, I apologize, that was another conversation in this thread. It's another member of our local non-profit that happens to be an Atheist Alliance.

I will take your advice in requesting the opportunity to view their budget though.
User avatar #118 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Oh so you know how I feel when I'm forced to provide my fathers employees with contraceptives even though it's against my religious beliefs?
#120 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
No, this is actually illegal and grounds for civil liberty suits. We're actively in court with two different organizations for their bias for the religious. Religious people feel they deserve special treatments. Everyone else just doesn't want religious shit forced down their throat.
User avatar #122 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Yes, you don't want your children taught religion in school, I understand that.
How is that any different than atheists teaching children that god's not real?
I don't want that forced down my children's throats. And as a matter of fact I offer a free room to any Father or Sister that comes to one of my motels. I'm providing them specials, do you want to sue me over that?
#124 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
If you advertise that you will offer a free room strictly to any religious individual then that is in fact a civil liberties case and I hope someone does address that with you at some point because it is highly illegal.

No one's teaching anyone that God isn't there except in that joke of a movie God's Not Dead. People are just teaching the facts and yes, people are getting more intelligent and realizing, "Hey, these scientific facts don't align with what the bible teach me. Maybe I should question it." The difference in your indoctrination and the one you fear we are making is that ours is unbiased and requires no speculation.
User avatar #134 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Are you trying to deny that teachers are saying God isn't real? Because they do, look it up. It also doesn't matter that I offer a priest a free night, if you want to take it up with a lawyer go ahead.

www.mtcoolidgemotel.com/
www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Review-g46140-d92185-Reviews-Nordic_Inn_Condominium_Resort-Lincoln_New_Hampshire.html

And nothing in the bible conflicts with science, if you actually understood and interpreted it you would see that, however you probably believe that Christians actually believe God created the world in 7 days and creationism or all those other things which aren't Catholic dogma. But sure, tell me what I have witnessed first hand is wrong, you're not imposing your views or anything.
#137 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Yes, Christians don't believe that. Except Christian fundamentalists which is a huge portion of Christians that fully believe in the creation story, Adam and Eve and all that jazz. If you don't believe it, that's your choice to not adhere to your holy book in that regard but several Christians do. You're not offering a free room to patrons just for being Christian which is the issue here. You're offering an individual a room as a personal favor. The fact that it does pertain to religion is highly irrelevant.


Sure, there have been a couple of outlandish teachers who opted to outright say that God does not exist and that's rude of them as there is no scientific evidence. There's also no scientific evidence that there's not an invisible gerbil floating four meters above my head that can be passed through with great ease but at that point it becomes a burden of proof debate and Christians always hate that one.


I've read the bible and several other holy books. My minor in college was theology and by the end of it all I was pretty well teaching the class because I was the only one who's entire debate wasn't, "Hurrdurr Jesus."


I am interested in your personal experience that brought you closer to God though, these psychosomatic events always give me a good chuckle.
User avatar #147 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
as a Christian the old testament isn't for today anyway.. the new testament is..
#221 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
Actually, Jesus in the bible says that he has come to not abolish the law, but uphold it. Christians often say this, but its like a 'get out of jail free card' to ignore the horrors of the Old Testament.
User avatar #235 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
but Christians now...like me, believe in the new testament, so it doesn't really matter what the old one said, plus the up said the new testament meets the modern world of today..
but, you don't have to agree cause you can believe what you want I don't care cause in America that's a god given right..
#236 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
You can believe whatever you like, but as I said, Jesus believed in the Old Testament so you can't just cherry pick the parts you like and the parts you don't. If you study the history of the bible and how scientifically flawed it is (not to mention how immoral and demeaning it is) you will cast it side and start to live life as a rational human being.
User avatar #237 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
actually NO. short summary: Jesus coming to die for our sins; saves the day.. boom! be good, and do good and believe in Jesus: boom! heaven and awesome after life..
User avatar #143 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Firstly you should provide these statistics stating that a good portion of Christians are fundamentalist.
Secondly when you say "a couple" that implies you know that there are very few Teachers saying god doesn't exist, but I'd like to know where you figured out an estimate of how many. It's also irrelevant how many teachers do this, it irks me that it happens in my neighborhood.
Third, what college did you go to? Because I'm taking some courses at Dartmouth College and we had some extremely intelligent debate regarding religion and theology.

Lastly what brought me closest to god was reading The Summa Theologiae, as well as Fides et Ratio. They really deepened my understanding of the way people surrender their thoughts to something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang or what gave the first organism life. But in conclusion to quote Thomas Acquinas, “To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.” or in other words, you wouldn't care.
User avatar #185 - lyiat (04/07/2014) [-]
In America, they are. I'm not arguing one way or another, but if you just take a look at the US census, you'll see the breakdown of religions in this country.

73% of all Americans are Christian. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) counts 26,344,933 members of mainline churches versus 39,930,869 members of evangelical Protestant churches. Evangelical is, virtually, synonymous with the word 'fundamentalist', though scholars still debate over the topic. Then you also have the Mormons, another fundamentalist group, counting for another 6.3 million souls, and whatever sect of Roman Catholics, of which I know quite a few personally, that are still fundamentalist.
#149 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Certainly not as prestigious a university as travelling outside of the state of Texas for College requires a bullshit extra tuition charge which sucks considering I was given rather outlandish scholarships only to go to a mid-tier 5A College. I attended several lectures when I was up North at Dartmouth and do envy you for having the opportunity. Texas schools are just shit if you're not a sports fan and I ended up going to a Christian university as it offered the best computer and applied science courses in the state.


I will pick up an ebook of Fides et Ratio (Actually in queue already) but comparing God to the Big Bang is a bit comical. All I'm saying is, if you want to teach your religion in schools, you have your own schools for that. Pushing faith on another person is wrong. Present ideas, let people think for themselves and ultimately just take everything into consideration.

As far as my statement on several Christians being fundamentalists, I only ask you to take a trip to the bible belt of the U.S. It becomes readily apparent.
User avatar #151 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Well, you never told me where you went to school, or where you got your information about the percentage of fundamentalists.
I don't think you understood my comparisons though, I said "something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang." People don't fully understand God or the Big Bang, what is comical about that?
Nonetheless it's late and I'm going to bed, but let me know what you think of Fides et Ratio.
#173 - anonymous (04/07/2014) [-]
According to a 2006 Gallup Poll:

27% of Americans believe religion should have more influence in America.

28% of Americans think the Bible is the actual word of God.

31% of Americans have a favorable view of Christian Fundamentalist religions.


#114 - No, as trilby wearing forever alone dickbags. Most atheists I …  [+] (24 new replies) 04/07/2014 on titanic +2
#115 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Sort of like Catholicism.
#117 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Not at all, I live in a rural area where businesses feel it's okay to ignore civil liberties and offer specials only to Christians and teach religion in public school. We simply combat that sort of thing because most of the people in our group (Myself included) have children and don't want our children lied to and misinformed.
User avatar #197 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
If you are in the States, then what you're describing is in direct violation of basic civil liberties written in the constitution itself... in the First Amendment. This really only applies to State institutions and legislature, but there are laws based on the principles of the First Amendment passed later that prevent businesses from prioritizing based on one's religious affiliation. There are exceptions though, like if the business is a Christian institution doing Christian work, then "being Christian" actually has a practical impact. Other than that, it's not legal what they're doing.

I don't know what you're so worked up about regarding schools "teaching religion" (in my opinion, you're just as closed-minded for trying to "shield" your children from it, being that it's a huge part of human history whether you like it or not), but regarding businesses, then as I said, that's simple discrimination.
#199 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
It's more the fact that the schools here refuse to teach evolution. The text book from a group member's daughter's class was from 1987 because all of the recent ones taught evolution. They can certainly teach about religion but they can't tell the children, "God created the earth and then Adam and Eve."
User avatar #200 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
No, of course they can't. I'm pretty sure that's illegal as well, because there's a basic curriculum that all schools in the United States have to cover over the course of a students attendance. I'm nearly 100 % sure that evolution is encompassed by this curriculum.

If your children are attending a school that imposes religious dogma and refuses to teach empirical science, then I would withdraw them immediately.

This is coming from a Catholic.
#202 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
She's since moved her children to another district that requires a half hour drive. This is a great inconvenience and the school is claiming that they can't afford new books. This, mind you, is a very wealthy district that just built the stadium equivalent of Thunderdome for a team that wins maybe one game a season.
User avatar #203 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
Who is "she"? Your ex-wife?

To put it bluntly, that's outrageous. You should demand to see their yearly budget, that's within your rights. Also, it doesn't matter if they "can't afford new books", they're still not meeting state requirements (I think... I hope). They'll have to download material of the internet and incorporate it into their current curriculum.
#205 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Ah, I apologize, that was another conversation in this thread. It's another member of our local non-profit that happens to be an Atheist Alliance.

I will take your advice in requesting the opportunity to view their budget though.
User avatar #118 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Oh so you know how I feel when I'm forced to provide my fathers employees with contraceptives even though it's against my religious beliefs?
#120 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
No, this is actually illegal and grounds for civil liberty suits. We're actively in court with two different organizations for their bias for the religious. Religious people feel they deserve special treatments. Everyone else just doesn't want religious shit forced down their throat.
User avatar #122 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Yes, you don't want your children taught religion in school, I understand that.
How is that any different than atheists teaching children that god's not real?
I don't want that forced down my children's throats. And as a matter of fact I offer a free room to any Father or Sister that comes to one of my motels. I'm providing them specials, do you want to sue me over that?
#124 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
If you advertise that you will offer a free room strictly to any religious individual then that is in fact a civil liberties case and I hope someone does address that with you at some point because it is highly illegal.

No one's teaching anyone that God isn't there except in that joke of a movie God's Not Dead. People are just teaching the facts and yes, people are getting more intelligent and realizing, "Hey, these scientific facts don't align with what the bible teach me. Maybe I should question it." The difference in your indoctrination and the one you fear we are making is that ours is unbiased and requires no speculation.
User avatar #134 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Are you trying to deny that teachers are saying God isn't real? Because they do, look it up. It also doesn't matter that I offer a priest a free night, if you want to take it up with a lawyer go ahead.

www.mtcoolidgemotel.com/
www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Review-g46140-d92185-Reviews-Nordic_Inn_Condominium_Resort-Lincoln_New_Hampshire.html

And nothing in the bible conflicts with science, if you actually understood and interpreted it you would see that, however you probably believe that Christians actually believe God created the world in 7 days and creationism or all those other things which aren't Catholic dogma. But sure, tell me what I have witnessed first hand is wrong, you're not imposing your views or anything.
#137 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Yes, Christians don't believe that. Except Christian fundamentalists which is a huge portion of Christians that fully believe in the creation story, Adam and Eve and all that jazz. If you don't believe it, that's your choice to not adhere to your holy book in that regard but several Christians do. You're not offering a free room to patrons just for being Christian which is the issue here. You're offering an individual a room as a personal favor. The fact that it does pertain to religion is highly irrelevant.


Sure, there have been a couple of outlandish teachers who opted to outright say that God does not exist and that's rude of them as there is no scientific evidence. There's also no scientific evidence that there's not an invisible gerbil floating four meters above my head that can be passed through with great ease but at that point it becomes a burden of proof debate and Christians always hate that one.


I've read the bible and several other holy books. My minor in college was theology and by the end of it all I was pretty well teaching the class because I was the only one who's entire debate wasn't, "Hurrdurr Jesus."


I am interested in your personal experience that brought you closer to God though, these psychosomatic events always give me a good chuckle.
User avatar #147 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
as a Christian the old testament isn't for today anyway.. the new testament is..
#221 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
Actually, Jesus in the bible says that he has come to not abolish the law, but uphold it. Christians often say this, but its like a 'get out of jail free card' to ignore the horrors of the Old Testament.
User avatar #235 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
but Christians now...like me, believe in the new testament, so it doesn't really matter what the old one said, plus the up said the new testament meets the modern world of today..
but, you don't have to agree cause you can believe what you want I don't care cause in America that's a god given right..
#236 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
You can believe whatever you like, but as I said, Jesus believed in the Old Testament so you can't just cherry pick the parts you like and the parts you don't. If you study the history of the bible and how scientifically flawed it is (not to mention how immoral and demeaning it is) you will cast it side and start to live life as a rational human being.
User avatar #237 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
actually NO. short summary: Jesus coming to die for our sins; saves the day.. boom! be good, and do good and believe in Jesus: boom! heaven and awesome after life..
User avatar #143 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Firstly you should provide these statistics stating that a good portion of Christians are fundamentalist.
Secondly when you say "a couple" that implies you know that there are very few Teachers saying god doesn't exist, but I'd like to know where you figured out an estimate of how many. It's also irrelevant how many teachers do this, it irks me that it happens in my neighborhood.
Third, what college did you go to? Because I'm taking some courses at Dartmouth College and we had some extremely intelligent debate regarding religion and theology.

Lastly what brought me closest to god was reading The Summa Theologiae, as well as Fides et Ratio. They really deepened my understanding of the way people surrender their thoughts to something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang or what gave the first organism life. But in conclusion to quote Thomas Acquinas, “To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.” or in other words, you wouldn't care.
User avatar #185 - lyiat (04/07/2014) [-]
In America, they are. I'm not arguing one way or another, but if you just take a look at the US census, you'll see the breakdown of religions in this country.

73% of all Americans are Christian. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) counts 26,344,933 members of mainline churches versus 39,930,869 members of evangelical Protestant churches. Evangelical is, virtually, synonymous with the word 'fundamentalist', though scholars still debate over the topic. Then you also have the Mormons, another fundamentalist group, counting for another 6.3 million souls, and whatever sect of Roman Catholics, of which I know quite a few personally, that are still fundamentalist.
#149 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Certainly not as prestigious a university as travelling outside of the state of Texas for College requires a bullshit extra tuition charge which sucks considering I was given rather outlandish scholarships only to go to a mid-tier 5A College. I attended several lectures when I was up North at Dartmouth and do envy you for having the opportunity. Texas schools are just shit if you're not a sports fan and I ended up going to a Christian university as it offered the best computer and applied science courses in the state.


I will pick up an ebook of Fides et Ratio (Actually in queue already) but comparing God to the Big Bang is a bit comical. All I'm saying is, if you want to teach your religion in schools, you have your own schools for that. Pushing faith on another person is wrong. Present ideas, let people think for themselves and ultimately just take everything into consideration.

As far as my statement on several Christians being fundamentalists, I only ask you to take a trip to the bible belt of the U.S. It becomes readily apparent.
User avatar #151 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Well, you never told me where you went to school, or where you got your information about the percentage of fundamentalists.
I don't think you understood my comparisons though, I said "something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang." People don't fully understand God or the Big Bang, what is comical about that?
Nonetheless it's late and I'm going to bed, but let me know what you think of Fides et Ratio.
#173 - anonymous (04/07/2014) [-]
According to a 2006 Gallup Poll:

27% of Americans believe religion should have more influence in America.

28% of Americans think the Bible is the actual word of God.

31% of Americans have a favorable view of Christian Fundamentalist religions.


#112 - I actually find it funny because people seem to view Atheists …  [+] (26 new replies) 04/07/2014 on titanic +1
User avatar #113 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
You view Bronys as people who don't believe in God?
#114 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
No, as trilby wearing forever alone dickbags. Most atheists I know are of an older crowd but then we're not just internet warriors. We're an actual non-profit and a public activist group.
#115 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Sort of like Catholicism.
#117 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Not at all, I live in a rural area where businesses feel it's okay to ignore civil liberties and offer specials only to Christians and teach religion in public school. We simply combat that sort of thing because most of the people in our group (Myself included) have children and don't want our children lied to and misinformed.
User avatar #197 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
If you are in the States, then what you're describing is in direct violation of basic civil liberties written in the constitution itself... in the First Amendment. This really only applies to State institutions and legislature, but there are laws based on the principles of the First Amendment passed later that prevent businesses from prioritizing based on one's religious affiliation. There are exceptions though, like if the business is a Christian institution doing Christian work, then "being Christian" actually has a practical impact. Other than that, it's not legal what they're doing.

I don't know what you're so worked up about regarding schools "teaching religion" (in my opinion, you're just as closed-minded for trying to "shield" your children from it, being that it's a huge part of human history whether you like it or not), but regarding businesses, then as I said, that's simple discrimination.
#199 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
It's more the fact that the schools here refuse to teach evolution. The text book from a group member's daughter's class was from 1987 because all of the recent ones taught evolution. They can certainly teach about religion but they can't tell the children, "God created the earth and then Adam and Eve."
User avatar #200 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
No, of course they can't. I'm pretty sure that's illegal as well, because there's a basic curriculum that all schools in the United States have to cover over the course of a students attendance. I'm nearly 100 % sure that evolution is encompassed by this curriculum.

If your children are attending a school that imposes religious dogma and refuses to teach empirical science, then I would withdraw them immediately.

This is coming from a Catholic.
#202 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
She's since moved her children to another district that requires a half hour drive. This is a great inconvenience and the school is claiming that they can't afford new books. This, mind you, is a very wealthy district that just built the stadium equivalent of Thunderdome for a team that wins maybe one game a season.
User avatar #203 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
Who is "she"? Your ex-wife?

To put it bluntly, that's outrageous. You should demand to see their yearly budget, that's within your rights. Also, it doesn't matter if they "can't afford new books", they're still not meeting state requirements (I think... I hope). They'll have to download material of the internet and incorporate it into their current curriculum.
#205 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Ah, I apologize, that was another conversation in this thread. It's another member of our local non-profit that happens to be an Atheist Alliance.

I will take your advice in requesting the opportunity to view their budget though.
User avatar #118 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Oh so you know how I feel when I'm forced to provide my fathers employees with contraceptives even though it's against my religious beliefs?
#120 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
No, this is actually illegal and grounds for civil liberty suits. We're actively in court with two different organizations for their bias for the religious. Religious people feel they deserve special treatments. Everyone else just doesn't want religious shit forced down their throat.
User avatar #122 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Yes, you don't want your children taught religion in school, I understand that.
How is that any different than atheists teaching children that god's not real?
I don't want that forced down my children's throats. And as a matter of fact I offer a free room to any Father or Sister that comes to one of my motels. I'm providing them specials, do you want to sue me over that?
#124 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
If you advertise that you will offer a free room strictly to any religious individual then that is in fact a civil liberties case and I hope someone does address that with you at some point because it is highly illegal.

No one's teaching anyone that God isn't there except in that joke of a movie God's Not Dead. People are just teaching the facts and yes, people are getting more intelligent and realizing, "Hey, these scientific facts don't align with what the bible teach me. Maybe I should question it." The difference in your indoctrination and the one you fear we are making is that ours is unbiased and requires no speculation.
User avatar #134 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Are you trying to deny that teachers are saying God isn't real? Because they do, look it up. It also doesn't matter that I offer a priest a free night, if you want to take it up with a lawyer go ahead.

www.mtcoolidgemotel.com/
www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Review-g46140-d92185-Reviews-Nordic_Inn_Condominium_Resort-Lincoln_New_Hampshire.html

And nothing in the bible conflicts with science, if you actually understood and interpreted it you would see that, however you probably believe that Christians actually believe God created the world in 7 days and creationism or all those other things which aren't Catholic dogma. But sure, tell me what I have witnessed first hand is wrong, you're not imposing your views or anything.
#137 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Yes, Christians don't believe that. Except Christian fundamentalists which is a huge portion of Christians that fully believe in the creation story, Adam and Eve and all that jazz. If you don't believe it, that's your choice to not adhere to your holy book in that regard but several Christians do. You're not offering a free room to patrons just for being Christian which is the issue here. You're offering an individual a room as a personal favor. The fact that it does pertain to religion is highly irrelevant.


Sure, there have been a couple of outlandish teachers who opted to outright say that God does not exist and that's rude of them as there is no scientific evidence. There's also no scientific evidence that there's not an invisible gerbil floating four meters above my head that can be passed through with great ease but at that point it becomes a burden of proof debate and Christians always hate that one.


I've read the bible and several other holy books. My minor in college was theology and by the end of it all I was pretty well teaching the class because I was the only one who's entire debate wasn't, "Hurrdurr Jesus."


I am interested in your personal experience that brought you closer to God though, these psychosomatic events always give me a good chuckle.
User avatar #147 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
as a Christian the old testament isn't for today anyway.. the new testament is..
#221 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
Actually, Jesus in the bible says that he has come to not abolish the law, but uphold it. Christians often say this, but its like a 'get out of jail free card' to ignore the horrors of the Old Testament.
User avatar #235 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
but Christians now...like me, believe in the new testament, so it doesn't really matter what the old one said, plus the up said the new testament meets the modern world of today..
but, you don't have to agree cause you can believe what you want I don't care cause in America that's a god given right..
#236 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
You can believe whatever you like, but as I said, Jesus believed in the Old Testament so you can't just cherry pick the parts you like and the parts you don't. If you study the history of the bible and how scientifically flawed it is (not to mention how immoral and demeaning it is) you will cast it side and start to live life as a rational human being.
User avatar #237 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
actually NO. short summary: Jesus coming to die for our sins; saves the day.. boom! be good, and do good and believe in Jesus: boom! heaven and awesome after life..
User avatar #143 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Firstly you should provide these statistics stating that a good portion of Christians are fundamentalist.
Secondly when you say "a couple" that implies you know that there are very few Teachers saying god doesn't exist, but I'd like to know where you figured out an estimate of how many. It's also irrelevant how many teachers do this, it irks me that it happens in my neighborhood.
Third, what college did you go to? Because I'm taking some courses at Dartmouth College and we had some extremely intelligent debate regarding religion and theology.

Lastly what brought me closest to god was reading The Summa Theologiae, as well as Fides et Ratio. They really deepened my understanding of the way people surrender their thoughts to something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang or what gave the first organism life. But in conclusion to quote Thomas Acquinas, “To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.” or in other words, you wouldn't care.
User avatar #185 - lyiat (04/07/2014) [-]
In America, they are. I'm not arguing one way or another, but if you just take a look at the US census, you'll see the breakdown of religions in this country.

73% of all Americans are Christian. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) counts 26,344,933 members of mainline churches versus 39,930,869 members of evangelical Protestant churches. Evangelical is, virtually, synonymous with the word 'fundamentalist', though scholars still debate over the topic. Then you also have the Mormons, another fundamentalist group, counting for another 6.3 million souls, and whatever sect of Roman Catholics, of which I know quite a few personally, that are still fundamentalist.
#149 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Certainly not as prestigious a university as travelling outside of the state of Texas for College requires a bullshit extra tuition charge which sucks considering I was given rather outlandish scholarships only to go to a mid-tier 5A College. I attended several lectures when I was up North at Dartmouth and do envy you for having the opportunity. Texas schools are just shit if you're not a sports fan and I ended up going to a Christian university as it offered the best computer and applied science courses in the state.


I will pick up an ebook of Fides et Ratio (Actually in queue already) but comparing God to the Big Bang is a bit comical. All I'm saying is, if you want to teach your religion in schools, you have your own schools for that. Pushing faith on another person is wrong. Present ideas, let people think for themselves and ultimately just take everything into consideration.

As far as my statement on several Christians being fundamentalists, I only ask you to take a trip to the bible belt of the U.S. It becomes readily apparent.
User avatar #151 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Well, you never told me where you went to school, or where you got your information about the percentage of fundamentalists.
I don't think you understood my comparisons though, I said "something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang." People don't fully understand God or the Big Bang, what is comical about that?
Nonetheless it's late and I'm going to bed, but let me know what you think of Fides et Ratio.
#173 - anonymous (04/07/2014) [-]
According to a 2006 Gallup Poll:

27% of Americans believe religion should have more influence in America.

28% of Americans think the Bible is the actual word of God.

31% of Americans have a favorable view of Christian Fundamentalist religions.


#103 - Meet every highly profitable market in the U.S. NFL, … 04/07/2014 on titanic +1
#99 - I thought the fact that this was written by a half-retarded ra…  [+] (2 new replies) 04/07/2014 on titanic +1
User avatar #100 - slenderwolf (04/07/2014) [-]
Well, for a half-retarded black guy, he seems to be doing pretty well.
#103 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Meet every highly profitable market in the U.S.

NFL, NBA, rap music, pop music, etc.
#91 - Well, the Titanic existed.  [+] (34 new replies) 04/07/2014 on titanic +25
User avatar #198 - niggernazi (04/07/2014) [-]
*tips fedora
#109 - muertealosafricano has deleted their comment.
#112 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
I actually find it funny because people seem to view Atheists the same way I view bronies. I don't know if the two commonly fall hand in hand or what.
User avatar #113 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
You view Bronys as people who don't believe in God?
#114 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
No, as trilby wearing forever alone dickbags. Most atheists I know are of an older crowd but then we're not just internet warriors. We're an actual non-profit and a public activist group.
#115 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Sort of like Catholicism.
#117 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Not at all, I live in a rural area where businesses feel it's okay to ignore civil liberties and offer specials only to Christians and teach religion in public school. We simply combat that sort of thing because most of the people in our group (Myself included) have children and don't want our children lied to and misinformed.
User avatar #197 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
If you are in the States, then what you're describing is in direct violation of basic civil liberties written in the constitution itself... in the First Amendment. This really only applies to State institutions and legislature, but there are laws based on the principles of the First Amendment passed later that prevent businesses from prioritizing based on one's religious affiliation. There are exceptions though, like if the business is a Christian institution doing Christian work, then "being Christian" actually has a practical impact. Other than that, it's not legal what they're doing.

I don't know what you're so worked up about regarding schools "teaching religion" (in my opinion, you're just as closed-minded for trying to "shield" your children from it, being that it's a huge part of human history whether you like it or not), but regarding businesses, then as I said, that's simple discrimination.
#199 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
It's more the fact that the schools here refuse to teach evolution. The text book from a group member's daughter's class was from 1987 because all of the recent ones taught evolution. They can certainly teach about religion but they can't tell the children, "God created the earth and then Adam and Eve."
User avatar #200 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
No, of course they can't. I'm pretty sure that's illegal as well, because there's a basic curriculum that all schools in the United States have to cover over the course of a students attendance. I'm nearly 100 % sure that evolution is encompassed by this curriculum.

If your children are attending a school that imposes religious dogma and refuses to teach empirical science, then I would withdraw them immediately.

This is coming from a Catholic.
#202 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
She's since moved her children to another district that requires a half hour drive. This is a great inconvenience and the school is claiming that they can't afford new books. This, mind you, is a very wealthy district that just built the stadium equivalent of Thunderdome for a team that wins maybe one game a season.
User avatar #203 - goldenglimmer (04/07/2014) [-]
Who is "she"? Your ex-wife?

To put it bluntly, that's outrageous. You should demand to see their yearly budget, that's within your rights. Also, it doesn't matter if they "can't afford new books", they're still not meeting state requirements (I think... I hope). They'll have to download material of the internet and incorporate it into their current curriculum.
#205 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Ah, I apologize, that was another conversation in this thread. It's another member of our local non-profit that happens to be an Atheist Alliance.

I will take your advice in requesting the opportunity to view their budget though.
User avatar #118 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Oh so you know how I feel when I'm forced to provide my fathers employees with contraceptives even though it's against my religious beliefs?
#120 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
No, this is actually illegal and grounds for civil liberty suits. We're actively in court with two different organizations for their bias for the religious. Religious people feel they deserve special treatments. Everyone else just doesn't want religious shit forced down their throat.
User avatar #122 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Yes, you don't want your children taught religion in school, I understand that.
How is that any different than atheists teaching children that god's not real?
I don't want that forced down my children's throats. And as a matter of fact I offer a free room to any Father or Sister that comes to one of my motels. I'm providing them specials, do you want to sue me over that?
#124 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
If you advertise that you will offer a free room strictly to any religious individual then that is in fact a civil liberties case and I hope someone does address that with you at some point because it is highly illegal.

No one's teaching anyone that God isn't there except in that joke of a movie God's Not Dead. People are just teaching the facts and yes, people are getting more intelligent and realizing, "Hey, these scientific facts don't align with what the bible teach me. Maybe I should question it." The difference in your indoctrination and the one you fear we are making is that ours is unbiased and requires no speculation.
User avatar #134 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Are you trying to deny that teachers are saying God isn't real? Because they do, look it up. It also doesn't matter that I offer a priest a free night, if you want to take it up with a lawyer go ahead.

www.mtcoolidgemotel.com/
www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Review-g46140-d92185-Reviews-Nordic_Inn_Condominium_Resort-Lincoln_New_Hampshire.html

And nothing in the bible conflicts with science, if you actually understood and interpreted it you would see that, however you probably believe that Christians actually believe God created the world in 7 days and creationism or all those other things which aren't Catholic dogma. But sure, tell me what I have witnessed first hand is wrong, you're not imposing your views or anything.
#137 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Yes, Christians don't believe that. Except Christian fundamentalists which is a huge portion of Christians that fully believe in the creation story, Adam and Eve and all that jazz. If you don't believe it, that's your choice to not adhere to your holy book in that regard but several Christians do. You're not offering a free room to patrons just for being Christian which is the issue here. You're offering an individual a room as a personal favor. The fact that it does pertain to religion is highly irrelevant.


Sure, there have been a couple of outlandish teachers who opted to outright say that God does not exist and that's rude of them as there is no scientific evidence. There's also no scientific evidence that there's not an invisible gerbil floating four meters above my head that can be passed through with great ease but at that point it becomes a burden of proof debate and Christians always hate that one.


I've read the bible and several other holy books. My minor in college was theology and by the end of it all I was pretty well teaching the class because I was the only one who's entire debate wasn't, "Hurrdurr Jesus."


I am interested in your personal experience that brought you closer to God though, these psychosomatic events always give me a good chuckle.
User avatar #147 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
as a Christian the old testament isn't for today anyway.. the new testament is..
#221 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
Actually, Jesus in the bible says that he has come to not abolish the law, but uphold it. Christians often say this, but its like a 'get out of jail free card' to ignore the horrors of the Old Testament.
User avatar #235 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
but Christians now...like me, believe in the new testament, so it doesn't really matter what the old one said, plus the up said the new testament meets the modern world of today..
but, you don't have to agree cause you can believe what you want I don't care cause in America that's a god given right..
#236 - popeflatus (04/07/2014) [-]
You can believe whatever you like, but as I said, Jesus believed in the Old Testament so you can't just cherry pick the parts you like and the parts you don't. If you study the history of the bible and how scientifically flawed it is (not to mention how immoral and demeaning it is) you will cast it side and start to live life as a rational human being.
User avatar #237 - acemcgunner (04/07/2014) [-]
actually NO. short summary: Jesus coming to die for our sins; saves the day.. boom! be good, and do good and believe in Jesus: boom! heaven and awesome after life..
User avatar #143 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Firstly you should provide these statistics stating that a good portion of Christians are fundamentalist.
Secondly when you say "a couple" that implies you know that there are very few Teachers saying god doesn't exist, but I'd like to know where you figured out an estimate of how many. It's also irrelevant how many teachers do this, it irks me that it happens in my neighborhood.
Third, what college did you go to? Because I'm taking some courses at Dartmouth College and we had some extremely intelligent debate regarding religion and theology.

Lastly what brought me closest to god was reading The Summa Theologiae, as well as Fides et Ratio. They really deepened my understanding of the way people surrender their thoughts to something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang or what gave the first organism life. But in conclusion to quote Thomas Acquinas, “To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.” or in other words, you wouldn't care.
User avatar #185 - lyiat (04/07/2014) [-]
In America, they are. I'm not arguing one way or another, but if you just take a look at the US census, you'll see the breakdown of religions in this country.

73% of all Americans are Christian. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) counts 26,344,933 members of mainline churches versus 39,930,869 members of evangelical Protestant churches. Evangelical is, virtually, synonymous with the word 'fundamentalist', though scholars still debate over the topic. Then you also have the Mormons, another fundamentalist group, counting for another 6.3 million souls, and whatever sect of Roman Catholics, of which I know quite a few personally, that are still fundamentalist.
#149 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Certainly not as prestigious a university as travelling outside of the state of Texas for College requires a bullshit extra tuition charge which sucks considering I was given rather outlandish scholarships only to go to a mid-tier 5A College. I attended several lectures when I was up North at Dartmouth and do envy you for having the opportunity. Texas schools are just shit if you're not a sports fan and I ended up going to a Christian university as it offered the best computer and applied science courses in the state.


I will pick up an ebook of Fides et Ratio (Actually in queue already) but comparing God to the Big Bang is a bit comical. All I'm saying is, if you want to teach your religion in schools, you have your own schools for that. Pushing faith on another person is wrong. Present ideas, let people think for themselves and ultimately just take everything into consideration.

As far as my statement on several Christians being fundamentalists, I only ask you to take a trip to the bible belt of the U.S. It becomes readily apparent.
User avatar #151 - muertealosafricano (04/07/2014) [-]
Well, you never told me where you went to school, or where you got your information about the percentage of fundamentalists.
I don't think you understood my comparisons though, I said "something they cannot fully understand be it God or what caused the Big Bang." People don't fully understand God or the Big Bang, what is comical about that?
Nonetheless it's late and I'm going to bed, but let me know what you think of Fides et Ratio.
#173 - anonymous (04/07/2014) [-]
According to a 2006 Gallup Poll:

27% of Americans believe religion should have more influence in America.

28% of Americans think the Bible is the actual word of God.

31% of Americans have a favorable view of Christian Fundamentalist religions.


User avatar #105 - lazaman (04/07/2014) [-]
Good point.
User avatar #98 - slenderwolf (04/07/2014) [-]
For the sake of the joke could you just humor us?
#99 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
I thought the fact that this was written by a half-retarded rapper was the joke.
User avatar #100 - slenderwolf (04/07/2014) [-]
Well, for a half-retarded black guy, he seems to be doing pretty well.
#103 - zeedeveel (04/07/2014) [-]
Meet every highly profitable market in the U.S.

NFL, NBA, rap music, pop music, etc.
#223 - I left off at the single player age because you ***** … 04/06/2014 on This hit a little too close... 0
#74 - An awesome green. Likely one of the most drastic changes in sh… 04/05/2014 on Cofagrigus is best shiny 0
#71 - It's an improvement but I'd say it fails in comparison to Espeon.  [+] (2 new replies) 04/05/2014 on Cofagrigus is best shiny 0
#72 - chessvencent (04/05/2014) [-]
Doesn't espeon just turn green?
#74 - zeedeveel (04/05/2014) [-]
An awesome green. Likely one of the most drastic changes in shinies.
#111 - I wanted so much for this to be my first green thumb given on … 04/05/2014 on Deaf Wife Story -1
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#1 - genma (02/09/2014) [-]
Yyyyyyyyyyo.. I hear you sell shinies.
I caught a Shiny Gligar recently, haven't trained it worth a point.

I can get you the details later, but... would you wanna buy it?
#2 to #1 - zeedeveel (02/09/2014) [-]
Pokemon caught seldom sell for anything. They have to be bred for competitive battling before they're worth anything.
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