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Date Signed Up:3/11/2014
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latest user's comments

#23 - I actually don't have a problem with these things. I mean, I …  [+] (3 replies) 6 hours ago on Harsh legal punishment of... -4
#32 - laclosa (1 hour ago) [-]
>I don't have a problem with any of these laws what if we implemented them

>lists a paragraph of changes to make the simple law of stoning for adultery married/unmarried and hand amputations for stealing acceptable for his society
User avatar
#29 - WutsAtroll (2 hours ago) [-]
why don't you go live there then? Let those of us who want to live with laws that aren't 1000 years old do so
User avatar
#26 - krajan (3 hours ago) [-]
Adultery is basically cheating i agree who cares who you sleep with but if your gonna get married just to cheat what's the point
#107 - Honest question - what has Trump done to indicate he is a whit…  [+] (1 reply) 8 hours ago on WHEW THIS SALT 0
User avatar
#114 - teamrocketninja (7 hours ago) [-]
Saying illegal immigration is in fact illegal and should be treated as such is racist now, you cis nazi white male scum.
#109 - I don't understand your point at all? Blacks kill mor…  [+] (1 reply) 12/07/2016 on Way too much. -2
#112 - surstromming (12/07/2016) [-]
Thats the prefect opposite of my point actually. my point is that murder is terrible no matter who it affects. A close family member of mine was murdered and it still hurts like hell. My point was that to stop the murders people should figure out why the murders are happening and to start that search you need to realize who is killing who.
#26 - Asking that someone alters how they *walk* in their own apartm…  [+] (2 replies) 12/04/2016 on Neighbors 0
User avatar
#34 - jzwangpk (12/04/2016) [-]
I've said this multiple times now - I still fail to see what compliance has to do with anything. So if they are unlikely to comply, this somehow makes the request unreasonable, or one that I should not make? The logic there escapes me, yet you continue to bring up the matter of whether or not I can expect them to comply.

Similarly, I continue to fail to see what the law has to do with this. In fact, I specifically said 'next to my driveway' in my example so that it would deliberately not be illegal, to demonstrate that something needn't be illegal to be inconveniencing and therefore give rise to a request to stop.

I couldn't care less about whether they comply or what the law says. If someone is doing something that inconveniences me, it is perfectly reasonable for me to ask them to avoid doing that thing.

Again, it's called etiquette. Holding doors for people, asking if people need help, even lending items to people who ask to borrow them. There's no law saying I have to do any of those things. By your logic, if someone asks that I do so, they shouldn't expect me to do so, since I'm not obligated to. Fine. But if I see someone with their hands full and they ask me to hold the door, I'll do it gladly. Because you're missing a major factor here, what with all your talk about laws and obligation to comply and whatnot - and that's, simply put, 'not being selfish'.
#35 - robuntu (12/05/2016) [-]
It's not unreasonable because they are unlikely to comply.
They are unlikely to comply because it is unreasonable.
#20 - That's where we disagree - it's *not* a reasonable request to …  [+] (4 replies) 12/04/2016 on Neighbors 0
User avatar
#24 - jzwangpk (12/04/2016) [-]
There's a difference between 'reasonable request' and 'reasonable expectation of fulfilment' though. Asking to cut in line is not comparable because cutting is, typically, frowned upon. Asking that someone try to be a little quieter is not; if they are disturbing you, you have every right to inform them so. Whether or not they honour it is quite irrelevant to whether it's a reasonable request.

Again, I fail to see what laws have to do with this. The mere lack of a law prohibiting something doesn't mean it's necessarily the ideal thing to do. If someone has parked their enormous Hummer right next to my driveway, making it impossible to check for oncoming traffic while backing out, they aren't doing anything illegal, but don't think for a moment that I won't go and politely request that they park it slightly further away. They may do it, they may not, but regardless, I've done my part, and it's their choice whether they want to be wilfully selfish at that point.
#26 - robuntu (12/04/2016) [-]
Asking that someone alters how they *walk* in their own apartment after 9pm is generally frowned upon. In fact, cutting in line will inconvenience someone far less than asking them to walk differently/walk less for the duration of your stay in the apartment.

Nobody is saying you don't have a 'right to ask them' to move. I'm just saying they have zero obligation to do so. Expecting them to do so would be silly. If you are lucky, they might grant you this favor, but if you want to live in a place without neighbors who *walk* on the floor after 9pm, you can only reasonably expect that if you are on the top floor/own the floor above you/etc...

But yeah - sure - you can ask people not to park on a city-owned street in front of your house. It's not reasonable to expect them to comply though, assuming the law allows them to do so. Conversely, if they were blocking your drive way, in most places, the law says that is illegal. It would be reasonable for you to expect them not to do that/to correct the issue if asked and if they do not, you have legal recourse against them.

That's why the law matters. Because it determines what happens when people don't comply with your requests.
User avatar
#34 - jzwangpk (12/04/2016) [-]
I've said this multiple times now - I still fail to see what compliance has to do with anything. So if they are unlikely to comply, this somehow makes the request unreasonable, or one that I should not make? The logic there escapes me, yet you continue to bring up the matter of whether or not I can expect them to comply.

Similarly, I continue to fail to see what the law has to do with this. In fact, I specifically said 'next to my driveway' in my example so that it would deliberately not be illegal, to demonstrate that something needn't be illegal to be inconveniencing and therefore give rise to a request to stop.

I couldn't care less about whether they comply or what the law says. If someone is doing something that inconveniences me, it is perfectly reasonable for me to ask them to avoid doing that thing.

Again, it's called etiquette. Holding doors for people, asking if people need help, even lending items to people who ask to borrow them. There's no law saying I have to do any of those things. By your logic, if someone asks that I do so, they shouldn't expect me to do so, since I'm not obligated to. Fine. But if I see someone with their hands full and they ask me to hold the door, I'll do it gladly. Because you're missing a major factor here, what with all your talk about laws and obligation to comply and whatnot - and that's, simply put, 'not being selfish'.
#35 - robuntu (12/05/2016) [-]
It's not unreasonable because they are unlikely to comply.
They are unlikely to comply because it is unreasonable.
#16 - Having lived in countless apartments, here is exactly how your…  [+] (6 replies) 12/04/2016 on Neighbors 0
User avatar
#18 - jzwangpk (12/04/2016) [-]
Does it matter? Telling yourself 'eh, they'd just ignore me anyway' is hardly a good reason to not at least try asking them, which is all I'm saying. It's a perfectly reasonable request to make, and furthermore, having made it, you have made them aware that they are disturbing you.
#20 - robuntu (12/04/2016) [-]
That's where we disagree - it's *not* a reasonable request to make.

Yes, you *can* make it. But it's not reasonable to expect them to honor it. You can ask to cut in line at the grocery store too, but it's not reasonable to expect people to let you. There are laws that govern noise in cities and there isn't a single one, in any city I've lived in, that would cover someone walking in their apartment.

It's an unreasonable request. Some people will grant you unreasonable requests, but most people won't.
User avatar
#24 - jzwangpk (12/04/2016) [-]
There's a difference between 'reasonable request' and 'reasonable expectation of fulfilment' though. Asking to cut in line is not comparable because cutting is, typically, frowned upon. Asking that someone try to be a little quieter is not; if they are disturbing you, you have every right to inform them so. Whether or not they honour it is quite irrelevant to whether it's a reasonable request.

Again, I fail to see what laws have to do with this. The mere lack of a law prohibiting something doesn't mean it's necessarily the ideal thing to do. If someone has parked their enormous Hummer right next to my driveway, making it impossible to check for oncoming traffic while backing out, they aren't doing anything illegal, but don't think for a moment that I won't go and politely request that they park it slightly further away. They may do it, they may not, but regardless, I've done my part, and it's their choice whether they want to be wilfully selfish at that point.
#26 - robuntu (12/04/2016) [-]
Asking that someone alters how they *walk* in their own apartment after 9pm is generally frowned upon. In fact, cutting in line will inconvenience someone far less than asking them to walk differently/walk less for the duration of your stay in the apartment.

Nobody is saying you don't have a 'right to ask them' to move. I'm just saying they have zero obligation to do so. Expecting them to do so would be silly. If you are lucky, they might grant you this favor, but if you want to live in a place without neighbors who *walk* on the floor after 9pm, you can only reasonably expect that if you are on the top floor/own the floor above you/etc...

But yeah - sure - you can ask people not to park on a city-owned street in front of your house. It's not reasonable to expect them to comply though, assuming the law allows them to do so. Conversely, if they were blocking your drive way, in most places, the law says that is illegal. It would be reasonable for you to expect them not to do that/to correct the issue if asked and if they do not, you have legal recourse against them.

That's why the law matters. Because it determines what happens when people don't comply with your requests.
User avatar
#34 - jzwangpk (12/04/2016) [-]
I've said this multiple times now - I still fail to see what compliance has to do with anything. So if they are unlikely to comply, this somehow makes the request unreasonable, or one that I should not make? The logic there escapes me, yet you continue to bring up the matter of whether or not I can expect them to comply.

Similarly, I continue to fail to see what the law has to do with this. In fact, I specifically said 'next to my driveway' in my example so that it would deliberately not be illegal, to demonstrate that something needn't be illegal to be inconveniencing and therefore give rise to a request to stop.

I couldn't care less about whether they comply or what the law says. If someone is doing something that inconveniences me, it is perfectly reasonable for me to ask them to avoid doing that thing.

Again, it's called etiquette. Holding doors for people, asking if people need help, even lending items to people who ask to borrow them. There's no law saying I have to do any of those things. By your logic, if someone asks that I do so, they shouldn't expect me to do so, since I'm not obligated to. Fine. But if I see someone with their hands full and they ask me to hold the door, I'll do it gladly. Because you're missing a major factor here, what with all your talk about laws and obligation to comply and whatnot - and that's, simply put, 'not being selfish'.
#35 - robuntu (12/05/2016) [-]
It's not unreasonable because they are unlikely to comply.
They are unlikely to comply because it is unreasonable.
#14 - It's unreasonable to ask someone to 'walk differently' in thei…  [+] (8 replies) 12/04/2016 on Neighbors +1
User avatar
#15 - jzwangpk (12/04/2016) [-]
Again, you're making logical leaps that are understandable but not necessarily relevant or applicable. I didn't say anything about laws or filing a noise complaint, nor do I expect people to 'tip-toe around their apartment'. You hardly have to tip-toe to walk quietly. I walk quietly naturally because of the way I walk, even in boots (but my roommate's a goddamn elephant even in socks).

Laws and enforcement have nothing to do with it. Of course footsteps are hardly unexpected when living in a multi-story residence but that doesn't mean they should just be stubbornly tolerated. If the residents of the apartment below mine told me that my footsteps were bothersome, I'd make an effort to walk more quietly. It's called etiquette, also known as being polite, also known as being a decent human being.
#16 - robuntu (12/04/2016) [-]
Having lived in countless apartments, here is exactly how your suggestion would play out....

You would go upstairs, talk to your neighbor who, best case scenario, would feign interest in your request. Within a week they'd be back to walking at their normal pace and volume.

User avatar
#18 - jzwangpk (12/04/2016) [-]
Does it matter? Telling yourself 'eh, they'd just ignore me anyway' is hardly a good reason to not at least try asking them, which is all I'm saying. It's a perfectly reasonable request to make, and furthermore, having made it, you have made them aware that they are disturbing you.
#20 - robuntu (12/04/2016) [-]
That's where we disagree - it's *not* a reasonable request to make.

Yes, you *can* make it. But it's not reasonable to expect them to honor it. You can ask to cut in line at the grocery store too, but it's not reasonable to expect people to let you. There are laws that govern noise in cities and there isn't a single one, in any city I've lived in, that would cover someone walking in their apartment.

It's an unreasonable request. Some people will grant you unreasonable requests, but most people won't.
User avatar
#24 - jzwangpk (12/04/2016) [-]
There's a difference between 'reasonable request' and 'reasonable expectation of fulfilment' though. Asking to cut in line is not comparable because cutting is, typically, frowned upon. Asking that someone try to be a little quieter is not; if they are disturbing you, you have every right to inform them so. Whether or not they honour it is quite irrelevant to whether it's a reasonable request.

Again, I fail to see what laws have to do with this. The mere lack of a law prohibiting something doesn't mean it's necessarily the ideal thing to do. If someone has parked their enormous Hummer right next to my driveway, making it impossible to check for oncoming traffic while backing out, they aren't doing anything illegal, but don't think for a moment that I won't go and politely request that they park it slightly further away. They may do it, they may not, but regardless, I've done my part, and it's their choice whether they want to be wilfully selfish at that point.
#26 - robuntu (12/04/2016) [-]
Asking that someone alters how they *walk* in their own apartment after 9pm is generally frowned upon. In fact, cutting in line will inconvenience someone far less than asking them to walk differently/walk less for the duration of your stay in the apartment.

Nobody is saying you don't have a 'right to ask them' to move. I'm just saying they have zero obligation to do so. Expecting them to do so would be silly. If you are lucky, they might grant you this favor, but if you want to live in a place without neighbors who *walk* on the floor after 9pm, you can only reasonably expect that if you are on the top floor/own the floor above you/etc...

But yeah - sure - you can ask people not to park on a city-owned street in front of your house. It's not reasonable to expect them to comply though, assuming the law allows them to do so. Conversely, if they were blocking your drive way, in most places, the law says that is illegal. It would be reasonable for you to expect them not to do that/to correct the issue if asked and if they do not, you have legal recourse against them.

That's why the law matters. Because it determines what happens when people don't comply with your requests.
User avatar
#34 - jzwangpk (12/04/2016) [-]
I've said this multiple times now - I still fail to see what compliance has to do with anything. So if they are unlikely to comply, this somehow makes the request unreasonable, or one that I should not make? The logic there escapes me, yet you continue to bring up the matter of whether or not I can expect them to comply.

Similarly, I continue to fail to see what the law has to do with this. In fact, I specifically said 'next to my driveway' in my example so that it would deliberately not be illegal, to demonstrate that something needn't be illegal to be inconveniencing and therefore give rise to a request to stop.

I couldn't care less about whether they comply or what the law says. If someone is doing something that inconveniences me, it is perfectly reasonable for me to ask them to avoid doing that thing.

Again, it's called etiquette. Holding doors for people, asking if people need help, even lending items to people who ask to borrow them. There's no law saying I have to do any of those things. By your logic, if someone asks that I do so, they shouldn't expect me to do so, since I'm not obligated to. Fine. But if I see someone with their hands full and they ask me to hold the door, I'll do it gladly. Because you're missing a major factor here, what with all your talk about laws and obligation to comply and whatnot - and that's, simply put, 'not being selfish'.
#35 - robuntu (12/05/2016) [-]
It's not unreasonable because they are unlikely to comply.
They are unlikely to comply because it is unreasonable.