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raibean

Last status update:
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Gender: female
Age: 24
Date Signed Up:2/19/2010
Last Login:12/12/2011
Location:Mordor
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Level 56 Content: Sammich eater → Level 57 Content: Sammich eater
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Times Content Favorited:62 times
Total Comments Made:2898
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latest user's comments

#167 - Californian, "chay-ree." I've always heard it that w…  [+] (1 reply) 11/06/2010 on Rhyming +1
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#171 - lucyland (11/06/2010) [-]
Yeah, California, I love that place :D The East Coast is pretty diverse with its accents. Even all the different parts of Pennsylvania all have different accents (no one says "wooder" in Lancaster). But New England... Boston accents make me want to injure a child with a spork.
#159 - No, most of those who came to the US were indentured servants.…  [+] (3 replies) 11/06/2010 on Rhyming +2
#161 - Squidge has deleted their comment.
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#340 - raibean (11/07/2010) [-]
I just believe that both have validity. they both have their own logic that goes for the society that uses them. American-English is far enough away from British English to be a Creole, like Haitian French and "proper" French. Most of the spelling differences were forced by dictionaries, and i know there are some that disagree in the UK, but I am unsure
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#168 - raibean (11/06/2010) [-]
... if there are any in American English, but I know for sure that One British dictionary (Oxford?) supports -ise in verbs stemming from Latin but -ize in verbs stemming from Greek while another (Cambridge?) supports -ise all the way. Another thing to be taken into account is that British English has far more French influence, especially when it comes to spelling, than American English, which will have more Spanish and German influence, both of which have a more phonetic view on their alphabets.
#148 - Do you say cherry with a long A sound or like the u in churro?  [+] (3 replies) 11/06/2010 on Rhyming +1
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#164 - lucyland (11/06/2010) [-]
The e in cherry is like the u in churro, yeah. I always thought it was weird that I said 'churry'. Which is yours?
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#167 - raibean (11/06/2010) [-]
Californian, "chay-ree." I've always heard it that way, but I can't say I've talked about cherries a lot since I've moved to the Midwest or in Texas. The East Coast has a larger diversity in accents than anywhere else in the US.
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#171 - lucyland (11/06/2010) [-]
Yeah, California, I love that place :D The East Coast is pretty diverse with its accents. Even all the different parts of Pennsylvania all have different accents (no one says "wooder" in Lancaster). But New England... Boston accents make me want to injure a child with a spork.
#197 - 8,17 11/06/2010 on Forever Alone 0