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Date Signed Up:9/06/2013
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latest user's comments

#102 - Miia, come on. What you said is just plain stupid.  [+] (3 new replies) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#103 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
User avatar #106 - RoyalNightmare (09/09/2013) [-]
You're really not letting this distaste for William go, are you? I personally agree that he's probably a bit over-praised. But when you look at history, it's clear that we've celebritized almost nothing but plagarizers and liars. Washington, Edison, Ford, etc. Some of the greatest minds, the ones we teach our children about, blatantly lied, stole or embellished their ideas and accomplishments.

Might as well accept that Shakespeare will be forever heralded as a genius in the field of playwright, because that's how history will always label him.
#120 - vapaus (09/09/2013) [-]
Many people make great philosophy, belief, and what-not that easily redefines things to a better perspective.

It is nearly impossible for anyone to convey those views to others in such a way that allows an accurate understanding. We don't praise people for the ideas they make, we praise them for sharing it in the best way we could imagine. No great philosophy is known by a fault in one's words, and memory comes from the spreading of these ideas over the larger scale. Shakespeare had the words, others had the ideas, we received them thoroughly.
#101 - Ha ha! I thought so too. 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#93 - ... I just answered you. We've been doing this forever up to t…  [+] (9 new replies) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
User avatar #98 - mindsculptorjace (09/09/2013) [-]
Please disreagard miia, it's past her bedtime and she's cranky from lack of coil-cuddles.
#101 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Ha ha! I thought so too.
User avatar #100 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
I'm cranky because of this archaic, overrated PoS feather-in-inkpot FRILLS AROUND MY NECK FAGGOT WRITER WHO CANT DO ANYTHING ORIGINAL
#160 - meinneger (09/09/2013) [-]
You're so hilariously dumb.
#125 - jaisharha (09/09/2013) [-]
Are you talking about the people who question that he did not in fact write his plays or merely that he wrote on common archetypes of the day?
Because in the second case... that's pretty much every story ever, he just wrote them well, played with twists and characters that hadn't been written on much before.

In regards to this particular post... the feather in inkpot and frills around the neck... its kinda affectations of the time... you cant exactly knock him for living in a very silly pompous age.

I agree with some of the others that it is somewhat stupid that we still praise him, by todays standards he offers nothing new but seriously... the man lived to barely see the 1600's... if there was something new on offer for us there, he is still worth studying as the basis for number of our still in use archetypes.

I mean will still study the story of Oedipus as one of the great stories and that was written in the 5th century BC...
#102 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Miia, come on. What you said is just plain stupid.
#103 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
User avatar #106 - RoyalNightmare (09/09/2013) [-]
You're really not letting this distaste for William go, are you? I personally agree that he's probably a bit over-praised. But when you look at history, it's clear that we've celebritized almost nothing but plagarizers and liars. Washington, Edison, Ford, etc. Some of the greatest minds, the ones we teach our children about, blatantly lied, stole or embellished their ideas and accomplishments.

Might as well accept that Shakespeare will be forever heralded as a genius in the field of playwright, because that's how history will always label him.
#120 - vapaus (09/09/2013) [-]
Many people make great philosophy, belief, and what-not that easily redefines things to a better perspective.

It is nearly impossible for anyone to convey those views to others in such a way that allows an accurate understanding. We don't praise people for the ideas they make, we praise them for sharing it in the best way we could imagine. No great philosophy is known by a fault in one's words, and memory comes from the spreading of these ideas over the larger scale. Shakespeare had the words, others had the ideas, we received them thoroughly.
#90 - What? That's not even remotely true. Maybe you mean that he ba…  [+] (17 new replies) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
User avatar #92 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
Uhuh.
Try to do that today.
User avatar #107 - themongoose (09/09/2013) [-]
Disney.
User avatar #108 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
I dont like them either
User avatar #109 - themongoose (09/09/2013) [-]
Doesn't really matter if you like it or not. You said "try to do that today."

It is done often. It is done extremely successfully. It is done today. Your point is null.
User avatar #111 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
Yes but Disney isn't exactly heralded as the greatest movie company in the world.
In fact they're openly criticized for their many mistakes and evils.
These criticisms arent exactly popular but at least they're THERE.

With shakespeare there's...well, buttrustled people like me who rant on the internet.
#189 - anonymous (09/09/2013) [-]
shut up you ignorant faggot.
User avatar #112 - themongoose (09/09/2013) [-]
Non sequitur. Back to the original statement, "Try to do that today."

I reiterate, it is done today.
#93 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
... I just answered you. We've been doing this forever up to this very second. Every film is a rewriting of an old story (sometimes it's even a remake (i.e The Great Gatsby)).
User avatar #98 - mindsculptorjace (09/09/2013) [-]
Please disreagard miia, it's past her bedtime and she's cranky from lack of coil-cuddles.
#101 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Ha ha! I thought so too.
User avatar #100 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
I'm cranky because of this archaic, overrated PoS feather-in-inkpot FRILLS AROUND MY NECK FAGGOT WRITER WHO CANT DO ANYTHING ORIGINAL
#160 - meinneger (09/09/2013) [-]
You're so hilariously dumb.
#125 - jaisharha (09/09/2013) [-]
Are you talking about the people who question that he did not in fact write his plays or merely that he wrote on common archetypes of the day?
Because in the second case... that's pretty much every story ever, he just wrote them well, played with twists and characters that hadn't been written on much before.

In regards to this particular post... the feather in inkpot and frills around the neck... its kinda affectations of the time... you cant exactly knock him for living in a very silly pompous age.

I agree with some of the others that it is somewhat stupid that we still praise him, by todays standards he offers nothing new but seriously... the man lived to barely see the 1600's... if there was something new on offer for us there, he is still worth studying as the basis for number of our still in use archetypes.

I mean will still study the story of Oedipus as one of the great stories and that was written in the 5th century BC...
#102 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Miia, come on. What you said is just plain stupid.
#103 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
User avatar #106 - RoyalNightmare (09/09/2013) [-]
You're really not letting this distaste for William go, are you? I personally agree that he's probably a bit over-praised. But when you look at history, it's clear that we've celebritized almost nothing but plagarizers and liars. Washington, Edison, Ford, etc. Some of the greatest minds, the ones we teach our children about, blatantly lied, stole or embellished their ideas and accomplishments.

Might as well accept that Shakespeare will be forever heralded as a genius in the field of playwright, because that's how history will always label him.
#120 - vapaus (09/09/2013) [-]
Many people make great philosophy, belief, and what-not that easily redefines things to a better perspective.

It is nearly impossible for anyone to convey those views to others in such a way that allows an accurate understanding. We don't praise people for the ideas they make, we praise them for sharing it in the best way we could imagine. No great philosophy is known by a fault in one's words, and memory comes from the spreading of these ideas over the larger scale. Shakespeare had the words, others had the ideas, we received them thoroughly.
#89 - South Park's creators, Trey Parker and Matt Stone, would be mo… 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#87 - You do know that Shakespeare is considered one of the greatest…  [+] (22 new replies) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
User avatar #88 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
He stole all of his plays except 1 (Midsummer Nights Dream) and rewrote them in different words.

Try to do that today, I fuckin' dare you.
User avatar #123 - theshadowed (09/09/2013) [-]
Thats a conspiracy with no actual evidence
User avatar #136 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
Aaaand you don't know what I'm even talking about
User avatar #195 - theshadowed (09/09/2013) [-]
You're saying Shakespeare stole his plays. Like this? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare_authorship_question
#90 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
What? That's not even remotely true. Maybe you mean that he based his plays on known stories of his time? Well, that's what humans have been doing ever since, I don't see a problem there.
User avatar #92 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
Uhuh.
Try to do that today.
User avatar #107 - themongoose (09/09/2013) [-]
Disney.
User avatar #108 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
I dont like them either
User avatar #109 - themongoose (09/09/2013) [-]
Doesn't really matter if you like it or not. You said "try to do that today."

It is done often. It is done extremely successfully. It is done today. Your point is null.
User avatar #111 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
Yes but Disney isn't exactly heralded as the greatest movie company in the world.
In fact they're openly criticized for their many mistakes and evils.
These criticisms arent exactly popular but at least they're THERE.

With shakespeare there's...well, buttrustled people like me who rant on the internet.
#189 - anonymous (09/09/2013) [-]
shut up you ignorant faggot.
User avatar #112 - themongoose (09/09/2013) [-]
Non sequitur. Back to the original statement, "Try to do that today."

I reiterate, it is done today.
#93 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
... I just answered you. We've been doing this forever up to this very second. Every film is a rewriting of an old story (sometimes it's even a remake (i.e The Great Gatsby)).
User avatar #98 - mindsculptorjace (09/09/2013) [-]
Please disreagard miia, it's past her bedtime and she's cranky from lack of coil-cuddles.
#101 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Ha ha! I thought so too.
User avatar #100 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
I'm cranky because of this archaic, overrated PoS feather-in-inkpot FRILLS AROUND MY NECK FAGGOT WRITER WHO CANT DO ANYTHING ORIGINAL
#160 - meinneger (09/09/2013) [-]
You're so hilariously dumb.
#125 - jaisharha (09/09/2013) [-]
Are you talking about the people who question that he did not in fact write his plays or merely that he wrote on common archetypes of the day?
Because in the second case... that's pretty much every story ever, he just wrote them well, played with twists and characters that hadn't been written on much before.

In regards to this particular post... the feather in inkpot and frills around the neck... its kinda affectations of the time... you cant exactly knock him for living in a very silly pompous age.

I agree with some of the others that it is somewhat stupid that we still praise him, by todays standards he offers nothing new but seriously... the man lived to barely see the 1600's... if there was something new on offer for us there, he is still worth studying as the basis for number of our still in use archetypes.

I mean will still study the story of Oedipus as one of the great stories and that was written in the 5th century BC...
#102 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Miia, come on. What you said is just plain stupid.
#103 - miia (09/09/2013) [-]
User avatar #106 - RoyalNightmare (09/09/2013) [-]
You're really not letting this distaste for William go, are you? I personally agree that he's probably a bit over-praised. But when you look at history, it's clear that we've celebritized almost nothing but plagarizers and liars. Washington, Edison, Ford, etc. Some of the greatest minds, the ones we teach our children about, blatantly lied, stole or embellished their ideas and accomplishments.

Might as well accept that Shakespeare will be forever heralded as a genius in the field of playwright, because that's how history will always label him.
#120 - vapaus (09/09/2013) [-]
Many people make great philosophy, belief, and what-not that easily redefines things to a better perspective.

It is nearly impossible for anyone to convey those views to others in such a way that allows an accurate understanding. We don't praise people for the ideas they make, we praise them for sharing it in the best way we could imagine. No great philosophy is known by a fault in one's words, and memory comes from the spreading of these ideas over the larger scale. Shakespeare had the words, others had the ideas, we received them thoroughly.
#1 - Comment deleted 09/09/2013 on (untitled) +1
#4 - Comment deleted 09/09/2013 on Skip please. +1
#81 - Oh! If that was your point, I never meant to disagree with it.  [+] (1 new reply) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#82 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
It's alright!
#78 - Yes, you are right about Romeo and Juliet. I agree with you. I…  [+] (3 new replies) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#80 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Yeah, I don't deny the intellectual value of his work, but someone today isn't necessarily stupid or illiterate just because they do not understand it as the uneducated people of his time did.
#81 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Oh! If that was your point, I never meant to disagree with it.
#82 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
It's alright!
#76 - Why wouldn't we understand those today? These are typical elem…  [+] (5 new replies) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#77 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
People behaved differently in regards to sex, class, etc. and again, there are references to cultural behaviors and views that simply do not exist today as they did back then.
Also, I thought I might point out that Romeo and Juliet is, in a way, a satirical comedy as well as a tragedy. Shakespeare was essentially mocking young love.
#78 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Yes, you are right about Romeo and Juliet. I agree with you. I think Shakespeare is worth reading simply for his wordsmith-y and incredibly well plotted out stories.
#80 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Yeah, I don't deny the intellectual value of his work, but someone today isn't necessarily stupid or illiterate just because they do not understand it as the uneducated people of his time did.
#81 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Oh! If that was your point, I never meant to disagree with it.
#82 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
It's alright!
#74 - Totally, but I don't think it really satirizes the upper-class…  [+] (7 new replies) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#75 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
I do not deny that, but my point was that he does often use satire and he makes references, sexual innuendos, etc. that we would not understand today.
#76 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Why wouldn't we understand those today? These are typical elements of high comedy and are cross-cultural and cross-historical.
#77 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
People behaved differently in regards to sex, class, etc. and again, there are references to cultural behaviors and views that simply do not exist today as they did back then.
Also, I thought I might point out that Romeo and Juliet is, in a way, a satirical comedy as well as a tragedy. Shakespeare was essentially mocking young love.
#78 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Yes, you are right about Romeo and Juliet. I agree with you. I think Shakespeare is worth reading simply for his wordsmith-y and incredibly well plotted out stories.
#80 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Yeah, I don't deny the intellectual value of his work, but someone today isn't necessarily stupid or illiterate just because they do not understand it as the uneducated people of his time did.
#81 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Oh! If that was your point, I never meant to disagree with it.
#82 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
It's alright!
#71 - Okay, interesting... Could you point at one play you just ment…  [+] (10 new replies) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#72 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
A Midsummer Night's Dream is most definitely a comedy.
#74 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Totally, but I don't think it really satirizes the upper-class... Or maybe it does, I haven't read it in a long while. My point was that Shakespeare was more renowned for his tragedies than comedies and MacBeth, Romeo and Juliet, and Othello are all tragedies.
#75 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
I do not deny that, but my point was that he does often use satire and he makes references, sexual innuendos, etc. that we would not understand today.
#76 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Why wouldn't we understand those today? These are typical elements of high comedy and are cross-cultural and cross-historical.
#77 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
People behaved differently in regards to sex, class, etc. and again, there are references to cultural behaviors and views that simply do not exist today as they did back then.
Also, I thought I might point out that Romeo and Juliet is, in a way, a satirical comedy as well as a tragedy. Shakespeare was essentially mocking young love.
#78 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Yes, you are right about Romeo and Juliet. I agree with you. I think Shakespeare is worth reading simply for his wordsmith-y and incredibly well plotted out stories.
#80 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Yeah, I don't deny the intellectual value of his work, but someone today isn't necessarily stupid or illiterate just because they do not understand it as the uneducated people of his time did.
#81 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Oh! If that was your point, I never meant to disagree with it.
#82 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
It's alright!
#73 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Many of his dramas also contain comedic relief, much of which is satire.
#69 - That's perfectly find. We need people like you in this world! 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#168 - k 09/09/2013 on I'ld press.. -2
#166 - Can I have soup?  [+] (2 new replies) 09/09/2013 on I'ld press.. -2
User avatar #167 - wetnoodle (09/09/2013) [-]
no its all mine
#168 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
k
#68 - I'm sorry, but I really have to disagree with you on your firs…  [+] (12 new replies) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#70 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
I've seen several, including A Midsummer Night's Dream, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet (of course), and Othello. I've read these as well.
#71 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Okay, interesting... Could you point at one play you just mentioned that is anything near a comedy-of-manners?
#72 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
A Midsummer Night's Dream is most definitely a comedy.
#74 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Totally, but I don't think it really satirizes the upper-class... Or maybe it does, I haven't read it in a long while. My point was that Shakespeare was more renowned for his tragedies than comedies and MacBeth, Romeo and Juliet, and Othello are all tragedies.
#75 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
I do not deny that, but my point was that he does often use satire and he makes references, sexual innuendos, etc. that we would not understand today.
#76 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Why wouldn't we understand those today? These are typical elements of high comedy and are cross-cultural and cross-historical.
#77 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
People behaved differently in regards to sex, class, etc. and again, there are references to cultural behaviors and views that simply do not exist today as they did back then.
Also, I thought I might point out that Romeo and Juliet is, in a way, a satirical comedy as well as a tragedy. Shakespeare was essentially mocking young love.
#78 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Yes, you are right about Romeo and Juliet. I agree with you. I think Shakespeare is worth reading simply for his wordsmith-y and incredibly well plotted out stories.
#80 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Yeah, I don't deny the intellectual value of his work, but someone today isn't necessarily stupid or illiterate just because they do not understand it as the uneducated people of his time did.
#81 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Oh! If that was your point, I never meant to disagree with it.
#82 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
It's alright!
#73 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Many of his dramas also contain comedic relief, much of which is satire.
#164 - You won the argument...  [+] (4 new replies) 09/09/2013 on I'ld press.. -3
User avatar #165 - wetnoodle (09/09/2013) [-]
i always am winrar
#166 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Can I have soup?
User avatar #167 - wetnoodle (09/09/2013) [-]
no its all mine
#168 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
k
#159 - Not if you're deformed at birth or something. 09/09/2013 on 13th Century Peasant Sex 0
#66 - That he is parodying certain aspects of his culture. Shakespea…  [+] (14 new replies) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#67 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Are you kidding me? He was known to be very satirical of the rich.
About the second part, maybe you just haven't seen a GOOD performance of Shakespeare? If the actors don't know what they're doing or how to properly convey the material, it can be harder to understand.
#68 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
I'm sorry, but I really have to disagree with you on your first point. Maybe are you confusing Shakespeare with Moliere? Shakespeare wasn't really a satirist per se, Moliere was. Could you tell me exactly which of Shakespeare plays you saw?
#70 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
I've seen several, including A Midsummer Night's Dream, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet (of course), and Othello. I've read these as well.
#71 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Okay, interesting... Could you point at one play you just mentioned that is anything near a comedy-of-manners?
#72 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
A Midsummer Night's Dream is most definitely a comedy.
#74 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Totally, but I don't think it really satirizes the upper-class... Or maybe it does, I haven't read it in a long while. My point was that Shakespeare was more renowned for his tragedies than comedies and MacBeth, Romeo and Juliet, and Othello are all tragedies.
#75 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
I do not deny that, but my point was that he does often use satire and he makes references, sexual innuendos, etc. that we would not understand today.
#76 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Why wouldn't we understand those today? These are typical elements of high comedy and are cross-cultural and cross-historical.
#77 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
People behaved differently in regards to sex, class, etc. and again, there are references to cultural behaviors and views that simply do not exist today as they did back then.
Also, I thought I might point out that Romeo and Juliet is, in a way, a satirical comedy as well as a tragedy. Shakespeare was essentially mocking young love.
#78 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Yes, you are right about Romeo and Juliet. I agree with you. I think Shakespeare is worth reading simply for his wordsmith-y and incredibly well plotted out stories.
#80 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Yeah, I don't deny the intellectual value of his work, but someone today isn't necessarily stupid or illiterate just because they do not understand it as the uneducated people of his time did.
#81 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Oh! If that was your point, I never meant to disagree with it.
#82 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
It's alright!
#73 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Many of his dramas also contain comedic relief, much of which is satire.
#65 - Much Ado About Nothing! 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#63 - Have you ever actually consumed a Shakespeare play in your life?  [+] (16 new replies) 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare 0
#64 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
What part of my comment do you disagree with?
#66 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
That he is parodying certain aspects of his culture. Shakespeare was mainly known for his tragedies which are not attempting anything humorous or satiric. Also, I, personally, don't find Shakespeare to be easier to understand on stage than on paper; I find it's easier when you can come back and read the verses a couple of times and let their meaning sink in. If you watch it live, you basically always have to follow the action and have less energy to spend on his incredibly clever (read not humorous/witty) dialogue.
#67 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Are you kidding me? He was known to be very satirical of the rich.
About the second part, maybe you just haven't seen a GOOD performance of Shakespeare? If the actors don't know what they're doing or how to properly convey the material, it can be harder to understand.
#68 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
I'm sorry, but I really have to disagree with you on your first point. Maybe are you confusing Shakespeare with Moliere? Shakespeare wasn't really a satirist per se, Moliere was. Could you tell me exactly which of Shakespeare plays you saw?
#70 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
I've seen several, including A Midsummer Night's Dream, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet (of course), and Othello. I've read these as well.
#71 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Okay, interesting... Could you point at one play you just mentioned that is anything near a comedy-of-manners?
#72 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
A Midsummer Night's Dream is most definitely a comedy.
#74 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Totally, but I don't think it really satirizes the upper-class... Or maybe it does, I haven't read it in a long while. My point was that Shakespeare was more renowned for his tragedies than comedies and MacBeth, Romeo and Juliet, and Othello are all tragedies.
#75 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
I do not deny that, but my point was that he does often use satire and he makes references, sexual innuendos, etc. that we would not understand today.
#76 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Why wouldn't we understand those today? These are typical elements of high comedy and are cross-cultural and cross-historical.
#77 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
People behaved differently in regards to sex, class, etc. and again, there are references to cultural behaviors and views that simply do not exist today as they did back then.
Also, I thought I might point out that Romeo and Juliet is, in a way, a satirical comedy as well as a tragedy. Shakespeare was essentially mocking young love.
#78 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Yes, you are right about Romeo and Juliet. I agree with you. I think Shakespeare is worth reading simply for his wordsmith-y and incredibly well plotted out stories.
#80 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Yeah, I don't deny the intellectual value of his work, but someone today isn't necessarily stupid or illiterate just because they do not understand it as the uneducated people of his time did.
#81 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Oh! If that was your point, I never meant to disagree with it.
#82 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
It's alright!
#73 - myshipsailedwoutme (09/09/2013) [-]
Many of his dramas also contain comedic relief, much of which is satire.
#62 - You're confusing Shakespeare with Moliere. 09/09/2013 on Studying Shakespeare +3
#160 - Ehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh Yes. I won the argument. Don't respond.  [+] (6 new replies) 09/09/2013 on I'ld press.. -10
User avatar #163 - wetnoodle (09/09/2013) [-]
arguing with me will not solve anything. Its like playing chess with a pigeon; you can make all the smart moves you want, but in the end, the pigeon will just knock over all the pieces, crap on the board and walk around like its victorious, so just don't play chess with´╗┐ a pigeon in the first place
#164 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
You won the argument...
User avatar #165 - wetnoodle (09/09/2013) [-]
i always am winrar
#166 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
Can I have soup?
User avatar #167 - wetnoodle (09/09/2013) [-]
no its all mine
#168 - pkrbarmoviea (09/09/2013) [-]
k
#123 - Just Binged it. He's right. 09/09/2013 on 'Murica -2
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