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Age: 20
Date Signed Up:12/17/2009
Last Login:5/28/2014
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latest user's comments

#201 - well im afraid your teacher is wrong then. im afraid im not sm…  [+] (3 new replies) 08/20/2012 on Lacking some 0
User avatar #218 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Have you ever put a battery in water. The electricity causes the water to break apart into 1 part oxygen and 2 parts hydrogen until the battery is removed, the battery runs out of power, or the water touching the battrery runs out.
User avatar #222 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
No i haven't. I never felt the need to randomly dunk a 9-volt into water.... why would i do that?
User avatar #228 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Science
#181 - you dont need direct contact to radioactive material in order …  [+] (6 new replies) 08/20/2012 on Lacking some +1
User avatar #183 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
In this case, yes you do, because the radiation byproduct of fission can be insulated against using various types of materials, lead being the most iconic.
Also, http://www.euronuclear.org/info/encyclopedia/images/bwr.jpg
User avatar #202 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
were did you learn all this? im not saying your wrong, allthough i think you are, but its just not what ive learnt.
User avatar #208 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Part logic, part awesome teacher, part morbid curiosity about the Chernobyl disaster. Look at the diagram, it's a generalized explaination of how all water-cooled reactors work. You'll note that the coolant cycle is nearly exclusive from the steam cycle. The pipe carrying the coolant water enters the condensation tank, where it absorbs some of the heat from the steam-cycle into itself by conducting it through the metal pipe, without transmitting any radioactive particles.
User avatar #212 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
Well it makes enough sense for me to concede, you would appear to be right good sir. I tip my hat to the greater mind.
User avatar #221 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Not greater, just more traveled. Tip mine to you.
#226 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
#180 - where did you learn that?  [+] (17 new replies) 08/20/2012 on Lacking some 0
#220 - anonymous (08/20/2012) [-]
Shut the fuck up holy shit why does it matter?
#225 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
now quite you, the grown up are talking.
User avatar #237 - creosote (08/20/2012) [-]
When in an intelligent conversation, make sure to pay attention to spelling. It makes you look slightly stupider then you probably are (That wasn't a dis by the way).
User avatar #239 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
what did i misspell?
User avatar #249 - creosote (08/20/2012) [-]
Quiet. You misplaced the "e," which isn't a big deal, but still. You've misspelled in other places, but I don't want to read through everything to find all of the errors.
User avatar #252 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
oh, thank you. my spelling isnt the greatest.
#223 - pedomegler has deleted their comment.
User avatar #184 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Chemistry class
User avatar #201 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
well im afraid your teacher is wrong then. im afraid im not smart enough to explain it properly tho
User avatar #218 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Have you ever put a battery in water. The electricity causes the water to break apart into 1 part oxygen and 2 parts hydrogen until the battery is removed, the battery runs out of power, or the water touching the battrery runs out.
User avatar #222 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
No i haven't. I never felt the need to randomly dunk a 9-volt into water.... why would i do that?
User avatar #228 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Science
User avatar #191 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
I would like to see some more substantiation of this. Nothing that i've learned ever states that water molecules can be destabilized by any type of radiation.
User avatar #198 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Yes, they can be destabilized, not made radioactive. Destablization would result in the bonds breaking. Causing radioactivity would require addition of neutrons.
User avatar #203 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
But the steam-cycle water is capable of carrying small amounts of radioactive material that comes off the fuel rods. Either way, the coolant-cycle water never mixes with the steam-cycle water, nor does it ever come into contact with the fuel rods, so it can't feasibly carry any radioactive material. You still haven't explained how radioactivity can overcome the strong nuclear force in molecules.
User avatar #210 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Strong nuclear force in water can be overcome by a 9-volt battery. I'm just saying that if you used the necessary energy to add enough neutrons to cause the water to become radioactive, the water would have gained enough energy to overcome the bonds. Radioactivity can't overcome strong nuclear force and I never said it could.
User avatar #215 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
I never said that the water itself would become radioactive, i said that it would carry radioactive material. I just mentioned it above in #211 as well as #203
#177 - then could you explain why the area around Hiroshima was radio…  [+] (4 new replies) 08/20/2012 on Lacking some 0
#188 - CaveboyZero has deleted their comment.
#182 - CaveboyZero has deleted their comment.
User avatar #209 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
Well i cant say that all made sense to me, but as ive stated further down im no Einstein. It made enough sense that my faith in what i thought has wavered to the point that i will believe you. That and it would appear the few people who agreed with me have been over run by a greater majority wich would mean more people agree with you and the other 2 people then me. I concede.
#185 - CaveboyZero has deleted their comment.
#173 - ....... could you explain why it would fall apart?  [+] (30 new replies) 08/20/2012 on Lacking some 0
User avatar #175 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
The energy needed to make it unstable would break the molecule apart.
User avatar #187 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
While your idea is correct, your method for arriving at the solution is assinine. Radiation from fission cannot destabilize the strong atomic force that holds most atoms, and most molecules together.
User avatar #194 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
But it also can't magically force extra neutrons into it.
#197 - AllYourBase has deleted their comment.
User avatar #205 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
The radioactive energy is turned into thermal energy which heats the water to run turbines to produce electricity. The only other thing that could be in there is alpha particles that, somehow, managed to get through the insulation, which would be strange, since Uranium 235 is used. U235 releases alpha particles, which are 2 protons and 2 neutrons and can be blocked by a piece of aluminum foil.
User avatar #211 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Well, in reality, you could block alpha particles with a sheet of paper, but wouldn't the constant motion of water against the fuel rods erode trace amounts of U-235 off of the fuel rods, which would then continue with the water through the cycle?
User avatar #238 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
The coolant is also, in most cases, the neutron moderator. That water is kept under high pressure to prevent it from boiling. It is flows past the rods and any high energy particles will hit it and transfer their energy to the water. The water then flows through tubes in the steam generator and transfer their heat to the water in there, causing it to boil and power the generator. That is the steam coming from the tower. The coolant/neutron moderator is reused indefinitely, so it doesn't matter if particles of the rod get into the water, they'll just flow around and around until they break down, and then the broken down parts will flow around and around.
User avatar #243 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Hm. seems that we're talking about two slightly different reactor setups here, but i do see your point. In either case, would it ever be possible for the hydrogen and hydroxide (or the hydrogen and oxygen) to re-form?
User avatar #244 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Yes, but that would require outside energy. I.e. setting the hydrogen on fire.
User avatar #250 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
And that would require being able to filter the oxygen and hydrogen from the coolant, not altogether difficult. The main issue would be causing pressure fluctuations inside of a closed system due to the combustion, as well as re-introducing the water back into the cycle.
User avatar #255 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Well, the coolant water wouldn't/doesn't actually break down.
#241 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
"It is flows past" OH DEAR SWEET CTHULHU, WHAT HAVE I TYPED?
User avatar #180 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
where did you learn that?
#220 - anonymous (08/20/2012) [-]
Shut the fuck up holy shit why does it matter?
#225 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
now quite you, the grown up are talking.
User avatar #237 - creosote (08/20/2012) [-]
When in an intelligent conversation, make sure to pay attention to spelling. It makes you look slightly stupider then you probably are (That wasn't a dis by the way).
User avatar #239 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
what did i misspell?
User avatar #249 - creosote (08/20/2012) [-]
Quiet. You misplaced the "e," which isn't a big deal, but still. You've misspelled in other places, but I don't want to read through everything to find all of the errors.
User avatar #252 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
oh, thank you. my spelling isnt the greatest.
#223 - pedomegler has deleted their comment.
User avatar #184 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Chemistry class
User avatar #201 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
well im afraid your teacher is wrong then. im afraid im not smart enough to explain it properly tho
User avatar #218 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Have you ever put a battery in water. The electricity causes the water to break apart into 1 part oxygen and 2 parts hydrogen until the battery is removed, the battery runs out of power, or the water touching the battrery runs out.
User avatar #222 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
No i haven't. I never felt the need to randomly dunk a 9-volt into water.... why would i do that?
User avatar #228 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Science
User avatar #191 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
I would like to see some more substantiation of this. Nothing that i've learned ever states that water molecules can be destabilized by any type of radiation.
User avatar #198 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Yes, they can be destabilized, not made radioactive. Destablization would result in the bonds breaking. Causing radioactivity would require addition of neutrons.
User avatar #203 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
But the steam-cycle water is capable of carrying small amounts of radioactive material that comes off the fuel rods. Either way, the coolant-cycle water never mixes with the steam-cycle water, nor does it ever come into contact with the fuel rods, so it can't feasibly carry any radioactive material. You still haven't explained how radioactivity can overcome the strong nuclear force in molecules.
User avatar #210 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Strong nuclear force in water can be overcome by a 9-volt battery. I'm just saying that if you used the necessary energy to add enough neutrons to cause the water to become radioactive, the water would have gained enough energy to overcome the bonds. Radioactivity can't overcome strong nuclear force and I never said it could.
User avatar #215 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
I never said that the water itself would become radioactive, i said that it would carry radioactive material. I just mentioned it above in #211 as well as #203
#163 - how so?  [+] (40 new replies) 08/20/2012 on Lacking some +1
User avatar #176 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
The water that is used to cool a reactor never enters the reaction chamber. It's on a closed loop that is seperate from the water circuit that uses the heat generated from fission to boil water and turn a turbine. The first circuit wraps around portions that require cooling, conducting heat into the coolant water, which then is circulated out either to condense, or to leave as plain steam. The second loop is sealed, and water isn't able to leave it, barring some exceptions, where outside water or coolant needs to be directly injected into the reactor to cool it in the event of an emergency.
User avatar #181 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
you dont need direct contact to radioactive material in order to make something else radioactive
User avatar #183 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
In this case, yes you do, because the radiation byproduct of fission can be insulated against using various types of materials, lead being the most iconic.
Also, http://www.euronuclear.org/info/encyclopedia/images/bwr.jpg
User avatar #202 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
were did you learn all this? im not saying your wrong, allthough i think you are, but its just not what ive learnt.
User avatar #208 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Part logic, part awesome teacher, part morbid curiosity about the Chernobyl disaster. Look at the diagram, it's a generalized explaination of how all water-cooled reactors work. You'll note that the coolant cycle is nearly exclusive from the steam cycle. The pipe carrying the coolant water enters the condensation tank, where it absorbs some of the heat from the steam-cycle into itself by conducting it through the metal pipe, without transmitting any radioactive particles.
User avatar #212 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
Well it makes enough sense for me to concede, you would appear to be right good sir. I tip my hat to the greater mind.
User avatar #221 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Not greater, just more traveled. Tip mine to you.
#226 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
User avatar #169 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
It's just steam. It is water particles. You can't make that radioactive. The water would fall apart first.
User avatar #173 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
....... could you explain why it would fall apart?
User avatar #175 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
The energy needed to make it unstable would break the molecule apart.
User avatar #187 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
While your idea is correct, your method for arriving at the solution is assinine. Radiation from fission cannot destabilize the strong atomic force that holds most atoms, and most molecules together.
User avatar #194 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
But it also can't magically force extra neutrons into it.
#197 - AllYourBase has deleted their comment.
User avatar #205 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
The radioactive energy is turned into thermal energy which heats the water to run turbines to produce electricity. The only other thing that could be in there is alpha particles that, somehow, managed to get through the insulation, which would be strange, since Uranium 235 is used. U235 releases alpha particles, which are 2 protons and 2 neutrons and can be blocked by a piece of aluminum foil.
User avatar #211 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Well, in reality, you could block alpha particles with a sheet of paper, but wouldn't the constant motion of water against the fuel rods erode trace amounts of U-235 off of the fuel rods, which would then continue with the water through the cycle?
User avatar #238 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
The coolant is also, in most cases, the neutron moderator. That water is kept under high pressure to prevent it from boiling. It is flows past the rods and any high energy particles will hit it and transfer their energy to the water. The water then flows through tubes in the steam generator and transfer their heat to the water in there, causing it to boil and power the generator. That is the steam coming from the tower. The coolant/neutron moderator is reused indefinitely, so it doesn't matter if particles of the rod get into the water, they'll just flow around and around until they break down, and then the broken down parts will flow around and around.
User avatar #243 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Hm. seems that we're talking about two slightly different reactor setups here, but i do see your point. In either case, would it ever be possible for the hydrogen and hydroxide (or the hydrogen and oxygen) to re-form?
User avatar #244 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Yes, but that would require outside energy. I.e. setting the hydrogen on fire.
User avatar #250 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
And that would require being able to filter the oxygen and hydrogen from the coolant, not altogether difficult. The main issue would be causing pressure fluctuations inside of a closed system due to the combustion, as well as re-introducing the water back into the cycle.
User avatar #255 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Well, the coolant water wouldn't/doesn't actually break down.
#241 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
"It is flows past" OH DEAR SWEET CTHULHU, WHAT HAVE I TYPED?
User avatar #180 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
where did you learn that?
#220 - anonymous (08/20/2012) [-]
Shut the fuck up holy shit why does it matter?
#225 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
now quite you, the grown up are talking.
User avatar #237 - creosote (08/20/2012) [-]
When in an intelligent conversation, make sure to pay attention to spelling. It makes you look slightly stupider then you probably are (That wasn't a dis by the way).
User avatar #239 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
what did i misspell?
User avatar #249 - creosote (08/20/2012) [-]
Quiet. You misplaced the "e," which isn't a big deal, but still. You've misspelled in other places, but I don't want to read through everything to find all of the errors.
User avatar #252 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
oh, thank you. my spelling isnt the greatest.
#223 - pedomegler has deleted their comment.
User avatar #184 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Chemistry class
User avatar #201 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
well im afraid your teacher is wrong then. im afraid im not smart enough to explain it properly tho
User avatar #218 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Have you ever put a battery in water. The electricity causes the water to break apart into 1 part oxygen and 2 parts hydrogen until the battery is removed, the battery runs out of power, or the water touching the battrery runs out.
User avatar #222 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
No i haven't. I never felt the need to randomly dunk a 9-volt into water.... why would i do that?
User avatar #228 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Science
User avatar #191 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
I would like to see some more substantiation of this. Nothing that i've learned ever states that water molecules can be destabilized by any type of radiation.
User avatar #198 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Yes, they can be destabilized, not made radioactive. Destablization would result in the bonds breaking. Causing radioactivity would require addition of neutrons.
User avatar #203 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
But the steam-cycle water is capable of carrying small amounts of radioactive material that comes off the fuel rods. Either way, the coolant-cycle water never mixes with the steam-cycle water, nor does it ever come into contact with the fuel rods, so it can't feasibly carry any radioactive material. You still haven't explained how radioactivity can overcome the strong nuclear force in molecules.
User avatar #210 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Strong nuclear force in water can be overcome by a 9-volt battery. I'm just saying that if you used the necessary energy to add enough neutrons to cause the water to become radioactive, the water would have gained enough energy to overcome the bonds. Radioactivity can't overcome strong nuclear force and I never said it could.
User avatar #215 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
I never said that the water itself would become radioactive, i said that it would carry radioactive material. I just mentioned it above in #211 as well as #203
#157 - actually the idiot is right aswell, that steam is now radioactive  [+] (56 new replies) 08/20/2012 on Lacking some -5
User avatar #214 - Nullifier (08/20/2012) [-]
It's not radioactive...
User avatar #219 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
Look down a few comments man, ive already conceded to more knowledgeable people then me. I was proven wrong.
User avatar #229 - Nullifier (08/20/2012) [-]
Oh, I see. My bad. Good for you that you can accept being wrong (honestly) because far too many people are too stupid to see any other point of view, even if that "point of view" is fact.
User avatar #232 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
No Problem man, you cant get to be as smart as the greats with out admiting your wrong every now and again. Just means that next time ill be right. Id rather be wrong once than rather a hundred times over.
User avatar #233 - Nullifier (08/20/2012) [-]
On the subject, look up the Wikipedia page for the "List of Common Misconceptions."

It will blow your mind.
User avatar #235 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
thanks
#170 - CaveboyZero has deleted their comment.
User avatar #192 - blueshiftz (08/20/2012) [-]
Actually its called thermal pollution. If soil heats up past a certain temperature it looses the ability to grow plants for a period of time. If water heats up a niche of fish will loose its habitat and a plant could grow excessively in the water. This plant may kill of a plant that salmon eat. Bears will loose a source of food from the salmon. It goes on and on. Either way... still pollution. Funnyjunkers that thumbed this, you are the ones lacking intelligence today!
User avatar #177 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
then could you explain why the area around Hiroshima was radioactive after the bomb dropped? (to anyone else who reads this i know it is a bit of a silly sounding question)
#188 - CaveboyZero has deleted their comment.
#182 - CaveboyZero has deleted their comment.
User avatar #209 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
Well i cant say that all made sense to me, but as ive stated further down im no Einstein. It made enough sense that my faith in what i thought has wavered to the point that i will believe you. That and it would appear the few people who agreed with me have been over run by a greater majority wich would mean more people agree with you and the other 2 people then me. I concede.
#185 - CaveboyZero has deleted their comment.
#161 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
#167 - creosote (08/20/2012) [-]
User avatar #163 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
how so?
User avatar #176 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
The water that is used to cool a reactor never enters the reaction chamber. It's on a closed loop that is seperate from the water circuit that uses the heat generated from fission to boil water and turn a turbine. The first circuit wraps around portions that require cooling, conducting heat into the coolant water, which then is circulated out either to condense, or to leave as plain steam. The second loop is sealed, and water isn't able to leave it, barring some exceptions, where outside water or coolant needs to be directly injected into the reactor to cool it in the event of an emergency.
User avatar #181 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
you dont need direct contact to radioactive material in order to make something else radioactive
User avatar #183 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
In this case, yes you do, because the radiation byproduct of fission can be insulated against using various types of materials, lead being the most iconic.
Also, http://www.euronuclear.org/info/encyclopedia/images/bwr.jpg
User avatar #202 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
were did you learn all this? im not saying your wrong, allthough i think you are, but its just not what ive learnt.
User avatar #208 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Part logic, part awesome teacher, part morbid curiosity about the Chernobyl disaster. Look at the diagram, it's a generalized explaination of how all water-cooled reactors work. You'll note that the coolant cycle is nearly exclusive from the steam cycle. The pipe carrying the coolant water enters the condensation tank, where it absorbs some of the heat from the steam-cycle into itself by conducting it through the metal pipe, without transmitting any radioactive particles.
User avatar #212 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
Well it makes enough sense for me to concede, you would appear to be right good sir. I tip my hat to the greater mind.
User avatar #221 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Not greater, just more traveled. Tip mine to you.
#226 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
User avatar #169 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
It's just steam. It is water particles. You can't make that radioactive. The water would fall apart first.
User avatar #173 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
....... could you explain why it would fall apart?
User avatar #175 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
The energy needed to make it unstable would break the molecule apart.
User avatar #187 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
While your idea is correct, your method for arriving at the solution is assinine. Radiation from fission cannot destabilize the strong atomic force that holds most atoms, and most molecules together.
User avatar #194 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
But it also can't magically force extra neutrons into it.
#197 - AllYourBase has deleted their comment.
User avatar #205 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
The radioactive energy is turned into thermal energy which heats the water to run turbines to produce electricity. The only other thing that could be in there is alpha particles that, somehow, managed to get through the insulation, which would be strange, since Uranium 235 is used. U235 releases alpha particles, which are 2 protons and 2 neutrons and can be blocked by a piece of aluminum foil.
User avatar #211 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Well, in reality, you could block alpha particles with a sheet of paper, but wouldn't the constant motion of water against the fuel rods erode trace amounts of U-235 off of the fuel rods, which would then continue with the water through the cycle?
User avatar #238 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
The coolant is also, in most cases, the neutron moderator. That water is kept under high pressure to prevent it from boiling. It is flows past the rods and any high energy particles will hit it and transfer their energy to the water. The water then flows through tubes in the steam generator and transfer their heat to the water in there, causing it to boil and power the generator. That is the steam coming from the tower. The coolant/neutron moderator is reused indefinitely, so it doesn't matter if particles of the rod get into the water, they'll just flow around and around until they break down, and then the broken down parts will flow around and around.
User avatar #243 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
Hm. seems that we're talking about two slightly different reactor setups here, but i do see your point. In either case, would it ever be possible for the hydrogen and hydroxide (or the hydrogen and oxygen) to re-form?
User avatar #244 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Yes, but that would require outside energy. I.e. setting the hydrogen on fire.
User avatar #250 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
And that would require being able to filter the oxygen and hydrogen from the coolant, not altogether difficult. The main issue would be causing pressure fluctuations inside of a closed system due to the combustion, as well as re-introducing the water back into the cycle.
User avatar #255 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Well, the coolant water wouldn't/doesn't actually break down.
#241 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
"It is flows past" OH DEAR SWEET CTHULHU, WHAT HAVE I TYPED?
User avatar #180 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
where did you learn that?
#220 - anonymous (08/20/2012) [-]
Shut the fuck up holy shit why does it matter?
#225 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
now quite you, the grown up are talking.
User avatar #237 - creosote (08/20/2012) [-]
When in an intelligent conversation, make sure to pay attention to spelling. It makes you look slightly stupider then you probably are (That wasn't a dis by the way).
User avatar #239 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
what did i misspell?
User avatar #249 - creosote (08/20/2012) [-]
Quiet. You misplaced the "e," which isn't a big deal, but still. You've misspelled in other places, but I don't want to read through everything to find all of the errors.
User avatar #252 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
oh, thank you. my spelling isnt the greatest.
#223 - pedomegler has deleted their comment.
User avatar #184 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Chemistry class
User avatar #201 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
well im afraid your teacher is wrong then. im afraid im not smart enough to explain it properly tho
User avatar #218 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Have you ever put a battery in water. The electricity causes the water to break apart into 1 part oxygen and 2 parts hydrogen until the battery is removed, the battery runs out of power, or the water touching the battrery runs out.
User avatar #222 - pedomegler (08/20/2012) [-]
No i haven't. I never felt the need to randomly dunk a 9-volt into water.... why would i do that?
User avatar #228 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Science
User avatar #191 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
I would like to see some more substantiation of this. Nothing that i've learned ever states that water molecules can be destabilized by any type of radiation.
User avatar #198 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Yes, they can be destabilized, not made radioactive. Destablization would result in the bonds breaking. Causing radioactivity would require addition of neutrons.
User avatar #203 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
But the steam-cycle water is capable of carrying small amounts of radioactive material that comes off the fuel rods. Either way, the coolant-cycle water never mixes with the steam-cycle water, nor does it ever come into contact with the fuel rods, so it can't feasibly carry any radioactive material. You still haven't explained how radioactivity can overcome the strong nuclear force in molecules.
User avatar #210 - tariv (08/20/2012) [-]
Strong nuclear force in water can be overcome by a 9-volt battery. I'm just saying that if you used the necessary energy to add enough neutrons to cause the water to become radioactive, the water would have gained enough energy to overcome the bonds. Radioactivity can't overcome strong nuclear force and I never said it could.
User avatar #215 - AllYourBase (08/20/2012) [-]
I never said that the water itself would become radioactive, i said that it would carry radioactive material. I just mentioned it above in #211 as well as #203
#996 - no 08/20/2012 on Warning: Not for Epileptics 0
#166 - gee thanks, now ill never be able to play that ever again 08/19/2012 on space invaders +5
#72 - im afraid were just going to have to agree to disagree here pal 08/19/2012 on Childhood 0
#69 - i am 18 dude, i grew up around these assholes. the school i ju… 08/19/2012 on Childhood 0
#62 - you keep talking about beatings. i was spanked with a belt whe… 08/19/2012 on Childhood 0
#54 - like i already said, not beaten, disciplined. there is a defin… 08/19/2012 on Childhood 0
#47 - not so ******* soft when abuela nails you in the … 08/19/2012 on Childhood +5
#43 - not beaten, disciplined 08/19/2012 on Childhood -1
#39 - Comment deleted 08/19/2012 on Wait, what? 0
#45 - Kills you in battle Gives you memorial service 08/19/2012 on Photogenic Rebel 0
#59 - already had it, any one have others like this?  [+] (1 new reply) 08/19/2012 on Quoth The Server, 404 0
#93 - rsisco (08/19/2012) [-]
do you have this one?
#15 - and now to favorite your comment and keep this brohoof forever  [+] (1 new reply) 08/18/2012 on I regret having this +1
#16 - wickkles (08/18/2012) [-]
You are baws mahn.
#13 - Way to be a Brony man /)  [+] (3 new replies) 08/18/2012 on I regret having this +1
User avatar #14 - wickkles (08/18/2012) [-]
I try! /)
User avatar #15 - pedomegler (08/18/2012) [-]
and now to favorite your comment and keep this brohoof forever
#16 - wickkles (08/18/2012) [-]
You are baws mahn.
#11 - hey Wickkles, how long was your hair dyed?  [+] (5 new replies) 08/18/2012 on I regret having this +1
User avatar #12 - wickkles (08/18/2012) [-]
3-4 months.
User avatar #13 - pedomegler (08/18/2012) [-]
Way to be a Brony man /)
User avatar #14 - wickkles (08/18/2012) [-]
I try! /)
User avatar #15 - pedomegler (08/18/2012) [-]
and now to favorite your comment and keep this brohoof forever
#16 - wickkles (08/18/2012) [-]
You are baws mahn.
#303 - Bugger off 08/18/2012 on Siri commercial 0
#239 - **pedomegler rolled user lunarshadowpi ** want to trade any items? 08/18/2012 on DINNER TIME... -1
#265 - well ill be damned.... 08/18/2012 on cdesdfgbhdxcffv 0
#264 - **pedomegler rolled user ffffyou ** want to trade any items?  [+] (1 new reply) 08/18/2012 on cdesdfgbhdxcffv 0
User avatar #265 - pedomegler (08/18/2012) [-]
well ill be damned....
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#4 - pedomegler (12/05/2010) [-]
Comment Picture
#3 - pedomegler (12/05/2010) [-]
Comment Picture
#1 - anonymous (05/24/2010) [-]
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User avatar #2 to #1 - pedomegler (05/24/2010) [-]
hey anon fag ever herd of block ip... oh wait ur anon LOL
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