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mcrut    

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mcrut Avatar Level 229 Comments: Mind Blower
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Gender: male
Age: 20
Steam Profile: 765611980531363
Date Signed Up:2/09/2010
Last Login:7/26/2014
Location:Chicago
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Content Ranking:#12955
Comment Ranking:#6723
Highest Content Rank:#2660
Highest Comment Rank:#4254
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Content Level Progress: 61% (61/100)
Level 129 Content: Respected Member Of Famiry → Level 130 Content: Respected Member Of Famiry
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Level 229 Comments: Mind Blower → Level 230 Comments: Ambassador Of Lulz
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latest user's comments

#36 - oooo yeah i see now  [+] (1 new reply) 12/26/2013 on Happy birthday +1
User avatar #37 - xsirwafflezx (12/26/2013) [-]
#34 - he doesn't play much and in ghosts it is really hard to level …  [+] (3 new replies) 12/26/2013 on Happy birthday +1
User avatar #35 - xsirwafflezx (12/26/2013) [-]
Ok, cool.
I think the joke intended slipped right by you.
User avatar #36 - mcrut (12/26/2013) [-]
oooo yeah i see now
User avatar #37 - xsirwafflezx (12/26/2013) [-]
#16 - I have a guy in my COD clan who is almost 50...  [+] (8 new replies) 12/26/2013 on Happy birthday +4
User avatar #57 - anorexikchimp (12/26/2013) [-]
On a scale of 1-10 how groomed are you?
User avatar #52 - cumfartz (12/26/2013) [-]
do you suck his dick?
#47 - xxxherfaultxxx (12/26/2013) [-]
WE FOUND HIM
User avatar #33 - xsirwafflezx (12/26/2013) [-]
What prestige?
User avatar #34 - mcrut (12/26/2013) [-]
he doesn't play much and in ghosts it is really hard to level up, probably still stuck on before the first prestige
User avatar #35 - xsirwafflezx (12/26/2013) [-]
Ok, cool.
I think the joke intended slipped right by you.
User avatar #36 - mcrut (12/26/2013) [-]
oooo yeah i see now
User avatar #37 - xsirwafflezx (12/26/2013) [-]
#55 - but i bought L4D2 a while ago... 12/26/2013 on Scumbag Gaben +1
#80 - That was actually a rigged fight 12/21/2013 on the updated bible 0
#42 - Science asks the hard questions. Religion attempts to answer.  [+] (1 new reply) 12/17/2013 on Coffee With Jesus +1
#53 - pettdavids (12/17/2013) [-]
Everyone asks the hard questions
Religion seeks the answers in a higher power
Science seeks the answers in what we can percieve with our senses and logic (that is, incredibly complex mathematics)
#68 - I am an engineering major, the day before that i have dynamics 12/16/2013 on Finals 0
#40 - I know that feel, I have a physics II and calc III on the same day  [+] (2 new replies) 12/16/2013 on Finals 0
User avatar #59 - matriculator (12/16/2013) [-]
You wouldn't happen to be an Engineering major, would you?
User avatar #68 - mcrut (12/16/2013) [-]
I am an engineering major, the day before that i have dynamics
#61 - link to this? 12/14/2013 on Think Happy thoughts 0
#114 - You are drowning in your self taught calculus, i dont get why … 12/13/2013 on I knew I was always doing... 0
#112 - Why cant you accept that it is not always a function?  [+] (3 new replies) 12/13/2013 on I knew I was always doing... 0
User avatar #113 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Because it is always a function
If we take your 50 newton force at a 30 degree angle, sin(pi/6) is just a point on the sine curve described by (pi/6,sin(pi/6))
Yes, it is a ratio, but we can define f(x) to be (x^2-1)/(x-1). That's also a ratio. Is our example f(x) a function? Of course it is! And what will the answer to f(0)? 1. And that can be described by (0,f(0)). Similar to out sin point.

Saying that sine is SOMETIMES a function just simply complicates things. Why would you complicate something so beautiful?
User avatar #118 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
r u 2 gonna fuk or wat
User avatar #114 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You are drowning in your self taught calculus, i dont get why you can't accept this. But i find it funny you haven't brought out your strongest argument
#109 - I heard was Bullshit from that comment. I am starting to smell…  [+] (6 new replies) 12/13/2013 on I knew I was always doing... 0
User avatar #111 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
And yeah, I must be a troll because I know college level courses.
It's possible to know higher level calculus at a younger age.
Einstein knew differential/integral calculus before he was 15. (I'm not comparing myself to Einstein, he's incredibly more intelligent than I am. Even though he used explosions in his thought experiment to disprove quantum theory. Which is kind of idiotic if you think about it. I'd much rather have Schrodinger's cat)
User avatar #110 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I didn't take a class. So, there's no particular proof I can give.
I can show you my knowledge of physics since that's my favorite subject. But, there's nothing you can ask me that I won't be able to find on the internet.

But still
lmgtfy.com/?q=trigonometric+function&l=1
User avatar #112 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
Why cant you accept that it is not always a function?
User avatar #113 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Because it is always a function
If we take your 50 newton force at a 30 degree angle, sin(pi/6) is just a point on the sine curve described by (pi/6,sin(pi/6))
Yes, it is a ratio, but we can define f(x) to be (x^2-1)/(x-1). That's also a ratio. Is our example f(x) a function? Of course it is! And what will the answer to f(0)? 1. And that can be described by (0,f(0)). Similar to out sin point.

Saying that sine is SOMETIMES a function just simply complicates things. Why would you complicate something so beautiful?
User avatar #118 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
r u 2 gonna fuk or wat
User avatar #114 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You are drowning in your self taught calculus, i dont get why you can't accept this. But i find it funny you haven't brought out your strongest argument
#107 - You said you are 17, well i am twenty and just finishing up my…  [+] (8 new replies) 12/13/2013 on I knew I was always doing... 0
User avatar #108 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Dude. I've taught myself college level physics when I was in 8th grade. I went on to particle physics in my freshmen year in high school while simultaneously learning Calculus including all of my high school courses. In the years that followed, I have not taken a single college level course, even though I expected myself to continue studying college level Chemistry, Computer Science, Programming, Biology, while of course, studying Calculus 2. I know 5 programming languages by heart, and developed programs that could compete with Mathematica if I released them.

I know just below the same information as you. But, I'm still a senior in high school.
So yeah.
User avatar #109 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I heard was Bullshit from that comment. I am starting to smell the troll now. What proof do you have for me? And it better be good damn proof.
User avatar #111 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
And yeah, I must be a troll because I know college level courses.
It's possible to know higher level calculus at a younger age.
Einstein knew differential/integral calculus before he was 15. (I'm not comparing myself to Einstein, he's incredibly more intelligent than I am. Even though he used explosions in his thought experiment to disprove quantum theory. Which is kind of idiotic if you think about it. I'd much rather have Schrodinger's cat)
User avatar #110 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I didn't take a class. So, there's no particular proof I can give.
I can show you my knowledge of physics since that's my favorite subject. But, there's nothing you can ask me that I won't be able to find on the internet.

But still
lmgtfy.com/?q=trigonometric+function&l=1
User avatar #112 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
Why cant you accept that it is not always a function?
User avatar #113 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Because it is always a function
If we take your 50 newton force at a 30 degree angle, sin(pi/6) is just a point on the sine curve described by (pi/6,sin(pi/6))
Yes, it is a ratio, but we can define f(x) to be (x^2-1)/(x-1). That's also a ratio. Is our example f(x) a function? Of course it is! And what will the answer to f(0)? 1. And that can be described by (0,f(0)). Similar to out sin point.

Saying that sine is SOMETIMES a function just simply complicates things. Why would you complicate something so beautiful?
User avatar #118 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
r u 2 gonna fuk or wat
User avatar #114 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You are drowning in your self taught calculus, i dont get why you can't accept this. But i find it funny you haven't brought out your strongest argument
#105 - I dont even know what to say, i agree that it is a curve and i…  [+] (15 new replies) 12/13/2013 on I knew I was always doing... 0
User avatar #106 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I won't accept what you're saying because it's just plain wrong. Every mathematician, every engineer, every physicist, everybody with a slight amount of credible education in mathematics in a credible university would say that sin is a function
It's just is. There's no arguing with that.
And, please tell me you're not actually a engineer. Because I'll fear for my life every time I walk across a bridge or something like that. To know there's engineers that didn't know sin is a function.
User avatar #115 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
dude, i am 87% sure that he's a troll. cuz no one is that stupid.
User avatar #116 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
He's level 223. He's a blue name. His recent comments aren't troll-like. He became so mad he thumbed down my comments. So, I'm not particularly sure he's trolling
But, since this debate ran on until we've reached out max replies. You might be right.

But, I hope to god that he doesn't get a job in anything slightly related to math.
User avatar #117 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
it's still possible. for example i have another account which have a blue name and is pretty high leveled, but some times i still troll just for fun. also, because i have a blue name, people don't usually see realize that i was trolling.
User avatar #119 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
in fact you pretty much have to have a older account to troll properly. take this comment for example, I have a troll name and a level of -250. people will realize that i'm a troll in an instant, and trolling is most effective when the other party don't realize anything.

troll accounts aren't for trolling but for shitposting and annoying other users with shits such as "lol, I just thumbed you down, asstwat.
#120 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
he trolls
User avatar #107 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You said you are 17, well i am twenty and just finishing up my third semester. I have taken courses that would make you scream in the night. I passed calc 1 in highschool and blazed through calc II in college. I munched on diff eq easily getting no less than a 92 on an exam in diff eq and that is some pure math and is also passing calc III as we speak. Please dont discredit a person who has just seen the brink of pain. I have passed physics one for engineers, and on my way to physics 2 this next week. I passed a class called statics which was extremely difficult, and currently passing a class called dynamics in which my instructor says was the hardest undergrad class he took and he has his masters in mechanical. Shut your fucking mouth, 17, where are you from and what have you taken to think you can tell what is what?
User avatar #108 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Dude. I've taught myself college level physics when I was in 8th grade. I went on to particle physics in my freshmen year in high school while simultaneously learning Calculus including all of my high school courses. In the years that followed, I have not taken a single college level course, even though I expected myself to continue studying college level Chemistry, Computer Science, Programming, Biology, while of course, studying Calculus 2. I know 5 programming languages by heart, and developed programs that could compete with Mathematica if I released them.

I know just below the same information as you. But, I'm still a senior in high school.
So yeah.
User avatar #109 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I heard was Bullshit from that comment. I am starting to smell the troll now. What proof do you have for me? And it better be good damn proof.
User avatar #111 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
And yeah, I must be a troll because I know college level courses.
It's possible to know higher level calculus at a younger age.
Einstein knew differential/integral calculus before he was 15. (I'm not comparing myself to Einstein, he's incredibly more intelligent than I am. Even though he used explosions in his thought experiment to disprove quantum theory. Which is kind of idiotic if you think about it. I'd much rather have Schrodinger's cat)
User avatar #110 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I didn't take a class. So, there's no particular proof I can give.
I can show you my knowledge of physics since that's my favorite subject. But, there's nothing you can ask me that I won't be able to find on the internet.

But still
lmgtfy.com/?q=trigonometric+function&l=1
User avatar #112 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
Why cant you accept that it is not always a function?
User avatar #113 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Because it is always a function
If we take your 50 newton force at a 30 degree angle, sin(pi/6) is just a point on the sine curve described by (pi/6,sin(pi/6))
Yes, it is a ratio, but we can define f(x) to be (x^2-1)/(x-1). That's also a ratio. Is our example f(x) a function? Of course it is! And what will the answer to f(0)? 1. And that can be described by (0,f(0)). Similar to out sin point.

Saying that sine is SOMETIMES a function just simply complicates things. Why would you complicate something so beautiful?
User avatar #118 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
r u 2 gonna fuk or wat
User avatar #114 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You are drowning in your self taught calculus, i dont get why you can't accept this. But i find it funny you haven't brought out your strongest argument
#30 - and you are feeling proud over an internet argument, i had an …  [+] (21 new replies) 12/12/2013 on I knew I was always doing... 0
User avatar #52 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Oh, and by the way. Your idea was shit.
You should feel ashamed of yourself if you're an engineer and you don't know that the sine curve is a function
I'm not even sure you're an engineer, because that was just high school physics. It wasn't even advanced physics. Also, why did you use degrees? You obviously know about radians. Did you even take pre-calc? I mean, at least Precalc teaches you about functions.

Damn, go learn your shit, then state something on the internet.
User avatar #105 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I dont even know what to say, i agree that it is a curve and it can also be used in different ways. The fact you won't even accept what i am saying is true makes me question your knowledge. Have fun winning your internet fight.
User avatar #106 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I won't accept what you're saying because it's just plain wrong. Every mathematician, every engineer, every physicist, everybody with a slight amount of credible education in mathematics in a credible university would say that sin is a function
It's just is. There's no arguing with that.
And, please tell me you're not actually a engineer. Because I'll fear for my life every time I walk across a bridge or something like that. To know there's engineers that didn't know sin is a function.
User avatar #115 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
dude, i am 87% sure that he's a troll. cuz no one is that stupid.
User avatar #116 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
He's level 223. He's a blue name. His recent comments aren't troll-like. He became so mad he thumbed down my comments. So, I'm not particularly sure he's trolling
But, since this debate ran on until we've reached out max replies. You might be right.

But, I hope to god that he doesn't get a job in anything slightly related to math.
User avatar #117 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
it's still possible. for example i have another account which have a blue name and is pretty high leveled, but some times i still troll just for fun. also, because i have a blue name, people don't usually see realize that i was trolling.
User avatar #119 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
in fact you pretty much have to have a older account to troll properly. take this comment for example, I have a troll name and a level of -250. people will realize that i'm a troll in an instant, and trolling is most effective when the other party don't realize anything.

troll accounts aren't for trolling but for shitposting and annoying other users with shits such as "lol, I just thumbed you down, asstwat.
#120 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
he trolls
User avatar #107 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You said you are 17, well i am twenty and just finishing up my third semester. I have taken courses that would make you scream in the night. I passed calc 1 in highschool and blazed through calc II in college. I munched on diff eq easily getting no less than a 92 on an exam in diff eq and that is some pure math and is also passing calc III as we speak. Please dont discredit a person who has just seen the brink of pain. I have passed physics one for engineers, and on my way to physics 2 this next week. I passed a class called statics which was extremely difficult, and currently passing a class called dynamics in which my instructor says was the hardest undergrad class he took and he has his masters in mechanical. Shut your fucking mouth, 17, where are you from and what have you taken to think you can tell what is what?
User avatar #108 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Dude. I've taught myself college level physics when I was in 8th grade. I went on to particle physics in my freshmen year in high school while simultaneously learning Calculus including all of my high school courses. In the years that followed, I have not taken a single college level course, even though I expected myself to continue studying college level Chemistry, Computer Science, Programming, Biology, while of course, studying Calculus 2. I know 5 programming languages by heart, and developed programs that could compete with Mathematica if I released them.

I know just below the same information as you. But, I'm still a senior in high school.
So yeah.
User avatar #109 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I heard was Bullshit from that comment. I am starting to smell the troll now. What proof do you have for me? And it better be good damn proof.
User avatar #111 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
And yeah, I must be a troll because I know college level courses.
It's possible to know higher level calculus at a younger age.
Einstein knew differential/integral calculus before he was 15. (I'm not comparing myself to Einstein, he's incredibly more intelligent than I am. Even though he used explosions in his thought experiment to disprove quantum theory. Which is kind of idiotic if you think about it. I'd much rather have Schrodinger's cat)
User avatar #110 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I didn't take a class. So, there's no particular proof I can give.
I can show you my knowledge of physics since that's my favorite subject. But, there's nothing you can ask me that I won't be able to find on the internet.

But still
lmgtfy.com/?q=trigonometric+function&l=1
User avatar #112 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
Why cant you accept that it is not always a function?
User avatar #113 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Because it is always a function
If we take your 50 newton force at a 30 degree angle, sin(pi/6) is just a point on the sine curve described by (pi/6,sin(pi/6))
Yes, it is a ratio, but we can define f(x) to be (x^2-1)/(x-1). That's also a ratio. Is our example f(x) a function? Of course it is! And what will the answer to f(0)? 1. And that can be described by (0,f(0)). Similar to out sin point.

Saying that sine is SOMETIMES a function just simply complicates things. Why would you complicate something so beautiful?
User avatar #118 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
r u 2 gonna fuk or wat
User avatar #114 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You are drowning in your self taught calculus, i dont get why you can't accept this. But i find it funny you haven't brought out your strongest argument
User avatar #91 - xolotyl (12/13/2013) [-]
Wtf is with all these people who don't know shit about math? I've been reading most of the stuff you've been saying and I'm surprised people are still debating you
User avatar #92 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
People saw a video about math, and immediately thought they were professionals at the topic
User avatar #46 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Why do you have to go and bring polar equations into here to complicate things?

By the way, points in the polar plane are expressed by how far the point is away from the origin, and the angle measurement it is. This is extremely different to the Cartesian plane, where points are expressed by the dependent value for x, and the independent value for y. And guess what? The definition of a function relies on the Cartesian plane. Not the polar plane.

But, if you really want to, you can translate the polar points into Cartesian points
keisan.casio.com/has10/SpecExec.cgi?id=system/2006/1223050577

And also, by the way, the side lengths of the triangle relies on the angle measurement. The side lengths DEPEND on the angle measurement. While, the angle measurement is INDEPENDENT. Have you ever heard of those two words before? The DEPENDENT variable is on the y axis. While the INDEPENDENT variable is on the x axis. So, if we define the x axis to be radians, and if we define the y axis to be the sin(x). BOOM, we have a sin(x) curve. Giving us what appears to be a function. And guess what. IT IS A FUNCTION
User avatar #47 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Independent value of X and dependent value of Y* Sorry I'm tired
#47 - As an engineering student i can confirm this. 12/12/2013 on In the Spirit Of Finals 0
#25 - A representation of the ratio of the side opposite to the angl…  [+] (72 new replies) 12/12/2013 on I knew I was always doing... -1
User avatar #26 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
So, what you're saying is that sin(x)= opposite/hypotenuse
But, let's define some variables here. Opposite=A Hypotenuse=C Just for the sake of the Pythagorean theorem
Sin(x)= A/C
So, it's taking a value, X, and it's using that value, to make an output
That's what a function does.

But, if you still have doubts. Use one of the simplest methods to test if it is a function or not.
1) Graph Sin(x)
2) If there's any places on the graph, such that if you drew a vertical line, that it would intersect on two different points, then it isn't a function

Jesus Christ, how are you an engineer if you don't know that sin(x) is a function?
#54 - anonymous (12/12/2013) [-]
Actually, if I had to say something sinx=y is a function. Sine itself is not a function. It is an operation.
User avatar #57 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I already proved that wrong
And it is a function because if we drew it on an xy plane, but define the y axis as sin(x), and the x axis as the measurement of the angle in radians. It turns into the sin(x) curve.
Usually, the y axis is defined as a f(x) or something similar to that.
#41 - fillthisspace (12/12/2013) [-]
Just an A level maths student here....

So when you say that it isn't a function if it intersects at two point on a graph... Does that mean that the equation of a circle isn't a function?
User avatar #50 - thedudeistheman (12/12/2013) [-]
A circle isn't a function.
#62 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I never said a circle, I said the equation of a circle. Also, at least explain to me why it isn't a function

Like I said, just an A level maths student
User avatar #64 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
The equation for a circle produces a circle. If a circle isn't a function, how would the equation to produce the circle be a function?

A function is one-to-one, meaning each x-value has only one y-value. Several x-values of a circle have two y-values, making a circle not a function (if I'm not mistaken, every x-value in a circle has two y-values, but I'm not positive about that). This is where the Vertical Line Test comes into play. If you place a vertical line over anywhere on a graph and it's intersected by two values, the graphed equation and the equation itself is not a function.

On the other hand, a y-value can have more than one x-value.

In short, the equation of a circle and the resulting circle aren't functions.
#80 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I've been thinking of functions, until now, as number machines, put number in, get number out. Am I wrong to think that?
User avatar #89 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
No, I don't think it's wrong to think of it like that. But if you do think about it like that, you have to make sure it is actually a function before you make any assumptions about it.
#71 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Why is it that if it has two solutions or whatever then it isn't a function? Or is it kinda just a thing I'll have to accept?
User avatar #88 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
I learned why a while ago, but I don't remember. It has something to do with the fact of it being one-to-one, but I can't expand any further on that.
User avatar #43 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Haven't you people heard of the vertical line test? The equation for the unit circle (in the Cartesian plane) is
x^2+y^2=1
In no way is that a function
#63 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I've always thought of a function as a number machine, put number in, get number out... Am I wrong?
#60 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Ah, I've known the equation of a circle to be (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2 = r^2

Could you not have f(x) = (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2
Would that not give 2 solutions on the y axis?
I'm fucking clueless... Always have been with functions
User avatar #65 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
How are you an A level student in Math?
Let me make sure. The A levels is the equivalent to an AP course in math?
Is the education in the UK really that bad?

The equation of the circle is indeed (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2 = r^2
But, the unit circle is the circle with the center on the origin, and a radius of 1. So:
x^2+y^2=1
This circle is extremely important in trigonometry, as it's where all the math came from

Anyway, graph is a function if and only if there's only one value for y, for any given x.
Giving y an exponent generally give the graph two values for a given x.
#78 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I'm far from stupid, I got an A in GCSE and an A in Further Maths. Like I said, I was only asking about something I got confused on. No need to be an ass
User avatar #131 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
With anything except advice on girls
#74 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
No need for insults, only trying to understand something I got confused on. A level is split into two years, I'm in my first year (year 12 in education, so I'm 17). I've just never been explained to what a function actually is, I just kinda had to pick up the idea
User avatar #81 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Yeah, I'm 17 as well. Taught myself Calculus 1 a while ago. Self-studying Calculus 2. Also, I've been taught what a function is back at 7/8th grade
But really, if you don't know what a function, there's no possible way you could be doing higher level mathematics.
And I meant no disrespect to you. If you haven't been taught what a function is, that's a fault on your educational system.
#98 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
A level is split into two years, AS and A2. In AS Maths I have to do 2 core modules ( C1 and C2) and an extra module (a choice between mechanics, statistics and decision, my school chose statistics). In A2 I have to do another 2 core modules (C3 and C4) and an extra module (again a choice between statistics, mechanics and decision, my school chose mechanics). Someone in my year is very good at maths and he showed me what's in C3 and C4, and there's a lot of calculus I think. So I don't think that the education system is bad or failing me, or that I'm stupid and shouldn't be doing A level. It's just simply that we don't learn it until next year.
User avatar #127 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
If you don't truly understand the very basics. You'll never truly understand something like integration.
#128 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
But the thing is, I do know how to use functions, it's just your definition confused me. I've never heard of the line test and I didn't know it didn't have 2 values. Integration is in C3, which is next year. The basics are GCSE, Further Maths and what I'm learning now. Like I said, I can't know something I haven't learnt.
User avatar #129 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
Look, you need to have a better definition for things than just "number machine"
You're going to be taught integration next year, right?
People said integration is probably one of the most difficult things in calculus
There's absolutely no way in hell, could you understand integration, if you can't even understand what a function is.
Not because the definition of a function is needed to understand integration. But because you need to hold yourself to a higher standard and realize you need to understand things in a much more in depth look other than "a number machine"
Things are only going to get worse.
Hold yourself to a higher standard, so when shit hits the fan, you'll be prepared.

I may seem like an asshole. But I'm doing it for good intentions. To make you realize that you do not know anything compared to some people. Go further understand maths, and how beautiful of a subject it truly is.
#130 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
Well you seem to know what you're talking about, would you be able to help me?
User avatar #100 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Your explanation of functions is shit, by the way
Here's an explanation of functions:
A function is simply a series of operations given to a particular variable. The vertical line test states that if we drew a vertical line at any point on a graph, and it intersects between two points, then it isn't a function
So, imagine the graph, f(x)=x^2+3 in your head. Or better yet, here's a utility to graph it
www.desmos.com/calculator
So, draw a vertical line anywhere on that graph, it will obviously intersect at only one point, correct?
Now graph x^2+y^2=1
If we draw a vertical line almost anywhere on that graph, we see that it intersects at two points. What this means is that if we have an input inside the selected graph, than we'd have two outputs.
So yes, the equation of a circle is not a function

What this means in your example of the "number machine," is that if we put a number inside that "machine," we'll have two numbers that are outputed. Which doesn't make any sense.

But seriously. If you're studying higher level mathematics like calculus. They'll just laugh you out of colleges and universities if you define a function as a "number machine"
#124 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
I don't see why you have to put people down cause they're not as smart or some shit. It just makes you look like an asswipe.
User avatar #125 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
Because engineers need to make sure they won't give someone who is using a medical device, 500 cc's of morphine when they asked for 5. That as soon as their bridge is built, that it won't fall. That the skyscraper in the city won't immediately fall down, killing hundreds, if not, thousands.

A simple definition like "number machine" just won't cut it, even if it's just to help understand the topic. You need to know that your medical device won't overdose the patient. That your bridge won't fall. That your skyscraper will still remain in the sky.
#126 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
But the thing is, I'm not doing any of those things, I'm still learning. I can't know something I haven't learnt. I'm still in school. So really, putting someone down who is still in school for not knowing something is pointless. I may not be the smartest but I'm not dumb. Helping those people wanting to learn more instead of calling them stupid would be much more beneficial. I wasn't trying to prove you wrong or anything, I asked you something I wasn't quite sure on because you seemed to know what you're talking about.
#123 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
I don't need to define the maths, I just simply need to do it, which I can
#122 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
Obviously you can't read. I said I think of it as a number machine, I put x in and I get y out. I never said I define it as that, it's a way for me to understand it
User avatar #101 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
I am the highest level mathematics there is
User avatar #104 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I want your abortion.
User avatar #102 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
How many times have I, alone, mentioned you?
User avatar #103 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
a lot, you must really like me
#96 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Well it's not that I didn't know what one was, it's just I haven't had it really defined, and your explanation confused me. I've used functions and what not and done a bit of calculus in Further Maths. I'm assuming you like in America, I've always had the impression that Americans learn calculus really early. In the UK you don't get to it until A level, unless you do Further Maths, but even then, I look back on it and realise it wasn't hard, so I'm assuming it was at a low level
#97 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Live in America*
User avatar #94 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
too be honest, the difficulty of Calculus is really overrated.
mathematics are easy by that i mean i'll fuck anyone with a pussy
User avatar #99 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Not saying it was hard. Calculus 1 was extremely easy. Calculus 2 is kinda difficult. Definitely not as challenging as people make it to be
I'll fuck anything with something long protruding from it, or a pussy. Doesn't matter to me
User avatar #30 - mcrut (12/12/2013) [-]
and you are feeling proud over an internet argument, i had an idea in my head and i went with it, took a risk, found out i was wrong. maybe i learned something, maybe i didn't. Sin can be used as a function but it is not entirely a function. For example i will bring up to ways you can split up force vector. say you are given the force vector is given along a 345 triangle and another is set on a 30 60 90 degree triangle. I have a force of 50 newtons. If the 4 is the vertical side and all I want is the vertical component of that force i would multiply that by four and then divide it by 5, 40 newtons in the vertical up direction. If i was given that same force making a 30 angle above the horizontal and again i wanted the vertical component of the force, i would multiply the force of 50 newtons by sin(30) (or pi/6 if you use radians) and i would get 25 Newtons in the vertical direction. Let us look at a 30 60 90 triangle, also represented by a 1, Sqrt(3), 2 triangle. Do the same thing as with the 345 and you get 25 Newtons just like the sin(30) method! You see here that the ratio definition is perfectly fine. Also what do you get when you have r=sin(theta)? What is really a function then? Are you just sticking to the xyz coordinate system or are you actually thinking about different manners in which you can a apply it?
User avatar #52 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Oh, and by the way. Your idea was shit.
You should feel ashamed of yourself if you're an engineer and you don't know that the sine curve is a function
I'm not even sure you're an engineer, because that was just high school physics. It wasn't even advanced physics. Also, why did you use degrees? You obviously know about radians. Did you even take pre-calc? I mean, at least Precalc teaches you about functions.

Damn, go learn your shit, then state something on the internet.
User avatar #105 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I dont even know what to say, i agree that it is a curve and it can also be used in different ways. The fact you won't even accept what i am saying is true makes me question your knowledge. Have fun winning your internet fight.
User avatar #106 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I won't accept what you're saying because it's just plain wrong. Every mathematician, every engineer, every physicist, everybody with a slight amount of credible education in mathematics in a credible university would say that sin is a function
It's just is. There's no arguing with that.
And, please tell me you're not actually a engineer. Because I'll fear for my life every time I walk across a bridge or something like that. To know there's engineers that didn't know sin is a function.
User avatar #115 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
dude, i am 87% sure that he's a troll. cuz no one is that stupid.
User avatar #116 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
He's level 223. He's a blue name. His recent comments aren't troll-like. He became so mad he thumbed down my comments. So, I'm not particularly sure he's trolling
But, since this debate ran on until we've reached out max replies. You might be right.

But, I hope to god that he doesn't get a job in anything slightly related to math.
User avatar #117 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
it's still possible. for example i have another account which have a blue name and is pretty high leveled, but some times i still troll just for fun. also, because i have a blue name, people don't usually see realize that i was trolling.
User avatar #119 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
in fact you pretty much have to have a older account to troll properly. take this comment for example, I have a troll name and a level of -250. people will realize that i'm a troll in an instant, and trolling is most effective when the other party don't realize anything.

troll accounts aren't for trolling but for shitposting and annoying other users with shits such as "lol, I just thumbed you down, asstwat.
#120 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
he trolls
User avatar #107 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You said you are 17, well i am twenty and just finishing up my third semester. I have taken courses that would make you scream in the night. I passed calc 1 in highschool and blazed through calc II in college. I munched on diff eq easily getting no less than a 92 on an exam in diff eq and that is some pure math and is also passing calc III as we speak. Please dont discredit a person who has just seen the brink of pain. I have passed physics one for engineers, and on my way to physics 2 this next week. I passed a class called statics which was extremely difficult, and currently passing a class called dynamics in which my instructor says was the hardest undergrad class he took and he has his masters in mechanical. Shut your fucking mouth, 17, where are you from and what have you taken to think you can tell what is what?
User avatar #108 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Dude. I've taught myself college level physics when I was in 8th grade. I went on to particle physics in my freshmen year in high school while simultaneously learning Calculus including all of my high school courses. In the years that followed, I have not taken a single college level course, even though I expected myself to continue studying college level Chemistry, Computer Science, Programming, Biology, while of course, studying Calculus 2. I know 5 programming languages by heart, and developed programs that could compete with Mathematica if I released them.

I know just below the same information as you. But, I'm still a senior in high school.
So yeah.
User avatar #109 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I heard was Bullshit from that comment. I am starting to smell the troll now. What proof do you have for me? And it better be good damn proof.
User avatar #111 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
And yeah, I must be a troll because I know college level courses.
It's possible to know higher level calculus at a younger age.
Einstein knew differential/integral calculus before he was 15. (I'm not comparing myself to Einstein, he's incredibly more intelligent than I am. Even though he used explosions in his thought experiment to disprove quantum theory. Which is kind of idiotic if you think about it. I'd much rather have Schrodinger's cat)
User avatar #110 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I didn't take a class. So, there's no particular proof I can give.
I can show you my knowledge of physics since that's my favorite subject. But, there's nothing you can ask me that I won't be able to find on the internet.

But still
lmgtfy.com/?q=trigonometric+function&l=1
User avatar #112 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
Why cant you accept that it is not always a function?
User avatar #113 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Because it is always a function
If we take your 50 newton force at a 30 degree angle, sin(pi/6) is just a point on the sine curve described by (pi/6,sin(pi/6))
Yes, it is a ratio, but we can define f(x) to be (x^2-1)/(x-1). That's also a ratio. Is our example f(x) a function? Of course it is! And what will the answer to f(0)? 1. And that can be described by (0,f(0)). Similar to out sin point.

Saying that sine is SOMETIMES a function just simply complicates things. Why would you complicate something so beautiful?
User avatar #118 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
r u 2 gonna fuk or wat
User avatar #114 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You are drowning in your self taught calculus, i dont get why you can't accept this. But i find it funny you haven't brought out your strongest argument
User avatar #91 - xolotyl (12/13/2013) [-]
Wtf is with all these people who don't know shit about math? I've been reading most of the stuff you've been saying and I'm surprised people are still debating you
User avatar #92 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
People saw a video about math, and immediately thought they were professionals at the topic
User avatar #46 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Why do you have to go and bring polar equations into here to complicate things?

By the way, points in the polar plane are expressed by how far the point is away from the origin, and the angle measurement it is. This is extremely different to the Cartesian plane, where points are expressed by the dependent value for x, and the independent value for y. And guess what? The definition of a function relies on the Cartesian plane. Not the polar plane.

But, if you really want to, you can translate the polar points into Cartesian points
keisan.casio.com/has10/SpecExec.cgi?id=system/2006/1223050577

And also, by the way, the side lengths of the triangle relies on the angle measurement. The side lengths DEPEND on the angle measurement. While, the angle measurement is INDEPENDENT. Have you ever heard of those two words before? The DEPENDENT variable is on the y axis. While the INDEPENDENT variable is on the x axis. So, if we define the x axis to be radians, and if we define the y axis to be the sin(x). BOOM, we have a sin(x) curve. Giving us what appears to be a function. And guess what. IT IS A FUNCTION
User avatar #47 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Independent value of X and dependent value of Y* Sorry I'm tired
#27 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
i have to disagree with you, sin ALONE is not a function, but a ratio.

BUT
the definition of sin, opposite / hypotenuse = sin, is a function

so in a way, you are both right
User avatar #29 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
The value of the opposite and the hypotenuse is dependent of the value of x
#31 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
sorry, my mistake.
I meant:
opposite / hypotenuse = x = sin θ (the angle)

it (sin alone) is still not a function on its own, is my point.
User avatar #32 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
First I'm just going to point this out

math.stackexchange.com/questions/395600/how-does-a-calculator-calculate-the-sine-cosine-tangent-using-just-a-number

And the it is a function because if we draw it on an xy plane, but define the y axis as sin(x), and the x axis as the radians. It turns into the sin(x) curve.
Usually, the y axis is defined as a f(x) or something similar to that.
#33 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
Well yea, you are completely right about that.

What i am trying to point out, is the difference between the function sin x and the idea, the concept of sin. you cannot use sin without a variable in maths, you have to use sin x or sin y or whatever other symbol you deem fit.

just like you can use lim x → ∞, but not ∞ (the symbol for infinity)
User avatar #34 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Then what is my previous example f(x)=x^2+3
It requires a variable
User avatar #35 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
That, of course, is a function.
A quadratic function, at that.
How does that prove your point?
User avatar #36 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
You said that sin(x) isn't a function because it requires a variable.
Every single function ever requires at least one variable. Except of course for g(x)=C such that C is a constant.
User avatar #38 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
I think you are confusing me with that other guy you quarreled with, i never said that sin(x) was not a function
x is the variable in sin(x), rite?
User avatar #48 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Yeah, no idea what you mean. But, if you have further doubts. I suggest you either look in every math textbook ever. Or perhaps the internet.

lmgtfy.com/?q=Is+sin(x)+a+function%3F
User avatar #39 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
>you cannot use sin without a variable in maths

Pretty sure you said that, right?
User avatar #40 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
yes, i said that.
sin = no variable
sin(x) = variable
#23 - Hmmmm it still just doesn't seem right  [+] (74 new replies) 12/12/2013 on I knew I was always doing... 0
User avatar #24 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Ok, define sin of x in your own words.
User avatar #25 - mcrut (12/12/2013) [-]
A representation of the ratio of the side opposite to the angle to the hypotenuse
User avatar #26 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
So, what you're saying is that sin(x)= opposite/hypotenuse
But, let's define some variables here. Opposite=A Hypotenuse=C Just for the sake of the Pythagorean theorem
Sin(x)= A/C
So, it's taking a value, X, and it's using that value, to make an output
That's what a function does.

But, if you still have doubts. Use one of the simplest methods to test if it is a function or not.
1) Graph Sin(x)
2) If there's any places on the graph, such that if you drew a vertical line, that it would intersect on two different points, then it isn't a function

Jesus Christ, how are you an engineer if you don't know that sin(x) is a function?
#54 - anonymous (12/12/2013) [-]
Actually, if I had to say something sinx=y is a function. Sine itself is not a function. It is an operation.
User avatar #57 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I already proved that wrong
And it is a function because if we drew it on an xy plane, but define the y axis as sin(x), and the x axis as the measurement of the angle in radians. It turns into the sin(x) curve.
Usually, the y axis is defined as a f(x) or something similar to that.
#41 - fillthisspace (12/12/2013) [-]
Just an A level maths student here....

So when you say that it isn't a function if it intersects at two point on a graph... Does that mean that the equation of a circle isn't a function?
User avatar #50 - thedudeistheman (12/12/2013) [-]
A circle isn't a function.
#62 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I never said a circle, I said the equation of a circle. Also, at least explain to me why it isn't a function

Like I said, just an A level maths student
User avatar #64 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
The equation for a circle produces a circle. If a circle isn't a function, how would the equation to produce the circle be a function?

A function is one-to-one, meaning each x-value has only one y-value. Several x-values of a circle have two y-values, making a circle not a function (if I'm not mistaken, every x-value in a circle has two y-values, but I'm not positive about that). This is where the Vertical Line Test comes into play. If you place a vertical line over anywhere on a graph and it's intersected by two values, the graphed equation and the equation itself is not a function.

On the other hand, a y-value can have more than one x-value.

In short, the equation of a circle and the resulting circle aren't functions.
#80 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I've been thinking of functions, until now, as number machines, put number in, get number out. Am I wrong to think that?
User avatar #89 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
No, I don't think it's wrong to think of it like that. But if you do think about it like that, you have to make sure it is actually a function before you make any assumptions about it.
#71 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Why is it that if it has two solutions or whatever then it isn't a function? Or is it kinda just a thing I'll have to accept?
User avatar #88 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
I learned why a while ago, but I don't remember. It has something to do with the fact of it being one-to-one, but I can't expand any further on that.
User avatar #43 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Haven't you people heard of the vertical line test? The equation for the unit circle (in the Cartesian plane) is
x^2+y^2=1
In no way is that a function
#63 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I've always thought of a function as a number machine, put number in, get number out... Am I wrong?
#60 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Ah, I've known the equation of a circle to be (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2 = r^2

Could you not have f(x) = (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2
Would that not give 2 solutions on the y axis?
I'm fucking clueless... Always have been with functions
User avatar #65 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
How are you an A level student in Math?
Let me make sure. The A levels is the equivalent to an AP course in math?
Is the education in the UK really that bad?

The equation of the circle is indeed (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2 = r^2
But, the unit circle is the circle with the center on the origin, and a radius of 1. So:
x^2+y^2=1
This circle is extremely important in trigonometry, as it's where all the math came from

Anyway, graph is a function if and only if there's only one value for y, for any given x.
Giving y an exponent generally give the graph two values for a given x.
#78 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I'm far from stupid, I got an A in GCSE and an A in Further Maths. Like I said, I was only asking about something I got confused on. No need to be an ass
User avatar #131 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
With anything except advice on girls
#74 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
No need for insults, only trying to understand something I got confused on. A level is split into two years, I'm in my first year (year 12 in education, so I'm 17). I've just never been explained to what a function actually is, I just kinda had to pick up the idea
User avatar #81 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Yeah, I'm 17 as well. Taught myself Calculus 1 a while ago. Self-studying Calculus 2. Also, I've been taught what a function is back at 7/8th grade
But really, if you don't know what a function, there's no possible way you could be doing higher level mathematics.
And I meant no disrespect to you. If you haven't been taught what a function is, that's a fault on your educational system.
#98 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
A level is split into two years, AS and A2. In AS Maths I have to do 2 core modules ( C1 and C2) and an extra module (a choice between mechanics, statistics and decision, my school chose statistics). In A2 I have to do another 2 core modules (C3 and C4) and an extra module (again a choice between statistics, mechanics and decision, my school chose mechanics). Someone in my year is very good at maths and he showed me what's in C3 and C4, and there's a lot of calculus I think. So I don't think that the education system is bad or failing me, or that I'm stupid and shouldn't be doing A level. It's just simply that we don't learn it until next year.
User avatar #127 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
If you don't truly understand the very basics. You'll never truly understand something like integration.
#128 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
But the thing is, I do know how to use functions, it's just your definition confused me. I've never heard of the line test and I didn't know it didn't have 2 values. Integration is in C3, which is next year. The basics are GCSE, Further Maths and what I'm learning now. Like I said, I can't know something I haven't learnt.
User avatar #129 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
Look, you need to have a better definition for things than just "number machine"
You're going to be taught integration next year, right?
People said integration is probably one of the most difficult things in calculus
There's absolutely no way in hell, could you understand integration, if you can't even understand what a function is.
Not because the definition of a function is needed to understand integration. But because you need to hold yourself to a higher standard and realize you need to understand things in a much more in depth look other than "a number machine"
Things are only going to get worse.
Hold yourself to a higher standard, so when shit hits the fan, you'll be prepared.

I may seem like an asshole. But I'm doing it for good intentions. To make you realize that you do not know anything compared to some people. Go further understand maths, and how beautiful of a subject it truly is.
#130 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
Well you seem to know what you're talking about, would you be able to help me?
User avatar #100 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Your explanation of functions is shit, by the way
Here's an explanation of functions:
A function is simply a series of operations given to a particular variable. The vertical line test states that if we drew a vertical line at any point on a graph, and it intersects between two points, then it isn't a function
So, imagine the graph, f(x)=x^2+3 in your head. Or better yet, here's a utility to graph it
www.desmos.com/calculator
So, draw a vertical line anywhere on that graph, it will obviously intersect at only one point, correct?
Now graph x^2+y^2=1
If we draw a vertical line almost anywhere on that graph, we see that it intersects at two points. What this means is that if we have an input inside the selected graph, than we'd have two outputs.
So yes, the equation of a circle is not a function

What this means in your example of the "number machine," is that if we put a number inside that "machine," we'll have two numbers that are outputed. Which doesn't make any sense.

But seriously. If you're studying higher level mathematics like calculus. They'll just laugh you out of colleges and universities if you define a function as a "number machine"
#124 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
I don't see why you have to put people down cause they're not as smart or some shit. It just makes you look like an asswipe.
User avatar #125 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
Because engineers need to make sure they won't give someone who is using a medical device, 500 cc's of morphine when they asked for 5. That as soon as their bridge is built, that it won't fall. That the skyscraper in the city won't immediately fall down, killing hundreds, if not, thousands.

A simple definition like "number machine" just won't cut it, even if it's just to help understand the topic. You need to know that your medical device won't overdose the patient. That your bridge won't fall. That your skyscraper will still remain in the sky.
#126 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
But the thing is, I'm not doing any of those things, I'm still learning. I can't know something I haven't learnt. I'm still in school. So really, putting someone down who is still in school for not knowing something is pointless. I may not be the smartest but I'm not dumb. Helping those people wanting to learn more instead of calling them stupid would be much more beneficial. I wasn't trying to prove you wrong or anything, I asked you something I wasn't quite sure on because you seemed to know what you're talking about.
#123 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
I don't need to define the maths, I just simply need to do it, which I can
#122 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
Obviously you can't read. I said I think of it as a number machine, I put x in and I get y out. I never said I define it as that, it's a way for me to understand it
User avatar #101 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
I am the highest level mathematics there is
User avatar #104 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I want your abortion.
User avatar #102 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
How many times have I, alone, mentioned you?
User avatar #103 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
a lot, you must really like me
#96 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Well it's not that I didn't know what one was, it's just I haven't had it really defined, and your explanation confused me. I've used functions and what not and done a bit of calculus in Further Maths. I'm assuming you like in America, I've always had the impression that Americans learn calculus really early. In the UK you don't get to it until A level, unless you do Further Maths, but even then, I look back on it and realise it wasn't hard, so I'm assuming it was at a low level
#97 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Live in America*
User avatar #94 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
too be honest, the difficulty of Calculus is really overrated.
mathematics are easy by that i mean i'll fuck anyone with a pussy
User avatar #99 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Not saying it was hard. Calculus 1 was extremely easy. Calculus 2 is kinda difficult. Definitely not as challenging as people make it to be
I'll fuck anything with something long protruding from it, or a pussy. Doesn't matter to me
User avatar #30 - mcrut (12/12/2013) [-]
and you are feeling proud over an internet argument, i had an idea in my head and i went with it, took a risk, found out i was wrong. maybe i learned something, maybe i didn't. Sin can be used as a function but it is not entirely a function. For example i will bring up to ways you can split up force vector. say you are given the force vector is given along a 345 triangle and another is set on a 30 60 90 degree triangle. I have a force of 50 newtons. If the 4 is the vertical side and all I want is the vertical component of that force i would multiply that by four and then divide it by 5, 40 newtons in the vertical up direction. If i was given that same force making a 30 angle above the horizontal and again i wanted the vertical component of the force, i would multiply the force of 50 newtons by sin(30) (or pi/6 if you use radians) and i would get 25 Newtons in the vertical direction. Let us look at a 30 60 90 triangle, also represented by a 1, Sqrt(3), 2 triangle. Do the same thing as with the 345 and you get 25 Newtons just like the sin(30) method! You see here that the ratio definition is perfectly fine. Also what do you get when you have r=sin(theta)? What is really a function then? Are you just sticking to the xyz coordinate system or are you actually thinking about different manners in which you can a apply it?
User avatar #52 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Oh, and by the way. Your idea was shit.
You should feel ashamed of yourself if you're an engineer and you don't know that the sine curve is a function
I'm not even sure you're an engineer, because that was just high school physics. It wasn't even advanced physics. Also, why did you use degrees? You obviously know about radians. Did you even take pre-calc? I mean, at least Precalc teaches you about functions.

Damn, go learn your shit, then state something on the internet.
User avatar #105 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I dont even know what to say, i agree that it is a curve and it can also be used in different ways. The fact you won't even accept what i am saying is true makes me question your knowledge. Have fun winning your internet fight.
User avatar #106 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I won't accept what you're saying because it's just plain wrong. Every mathematician, every engineer, every physicist, everybody with a slight amount of credible education in mathematics in a credible university would say that sin is a function
It's just is. There's no arguing with that.
And, please tell me you're not actually a engineer. Because I'll fear for my life every time I walk across a bridge or something like that. To know there's engineers that didn't know sin is a function.
User avatar #115 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
dude, i am 87% sure that he's a troll. cuz no one is that stupid.
User avatar #116 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
He's level 223. He's a blue name. His recent comments aren't troll-like. He became so mad he thumbed down my comments. So, I'm not particularly sure he's trolling
But, since this debate ran on until we've reached out max replies. You might be right.

But, I hope to god that he doesn't get a job in anything slightly related to math.
User avatar #117 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
it's still possible. for example i have another account which have a blue name and is pretty high leveled, but some times i still troll just for fun. also, because i have a blue name, people don't usually see realize that i was trolling.
User avatar #119 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
in fact you pretty much have to have a older account to troll properly. take this comment for example, I have a troll name and a level of -250. people will realize that i'm a troll in an instant, and trolling is most effective when the other party don't realize anything.

troll accounts aren't for trolling but for shitposting and annoying other users with shits such as "lol, I just thumbed you down, asstwat.
#120 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
he trolls
User avatar #107 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You said you are 17, well i am twenty and just finishing up my third semester. I have taken courses that would make you scream in the night. I passed calc 1 in highschool and blazed through calc II in college. I munched on diff eq easily getting no less than a 92 on an exam in diff eq and that is some pure math and is also passing calc III as we speak. Please dont discredit a person who has just seen the brink of pain. I have passed physics one for engineers, and on my way to physics 2 this next week. I passed a class called statics which was extremely difficult, and currently passing a class called dynamics in which my instructor says was the hardest undergrad class he took and he has his masters in mechanical. Shut your fucking mouth, 17, where are you from and what have you taken to think you can tell what is what?
User avatar #108 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Dude. I've taught myself college level physics when I was in 8th grade. I went on to particle physics in my freshmen year in high school while simultaneously learning Calculus including all of my high school courses. In the years that followed, I have not taken a single college level course, even though I expected myself to continue studying college level Chemistry, Computer Science, Programming, Biology, while of course, studying Calculus 2. I know 5 programming languages by heart, and developed programs that could compete with Mathematica if I released them.

I know just below the same information as you. But, I'm still a senior in high school.
So yeah.
User avatar #109 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I heard was Bullshit from that comment. I am starting to smell the troll now. What proof do you have for me? And it better be good damn proof.
User avatar #111 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
And yeah, I must be a troll because I know college level courses.
It's possible to know higher level calculus at a younger age.
Einstein knew differential/integral calculus before he was 15. (I'm not comparing myself to Einstein, he's incredibly more intelligent than I am. Even though he used explosions in his thought experiment to disprove quantum theory. Which is kind of idiotic if you think about it. I'd much rather have Schrodinger's cat)
User avatar #110 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I didn't take a class. So, there's no particular proof I can give.
I can show you my knowledge of physics since that's my favorite subject. But, there's nothing you can ask me that I won't be able to find on the internet.

But still
lmgtfy.com/?q=trigonometric+function&l=1
User avatar #112 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
Why cant you accept that it is not always a function?
User avatar #113 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Because it is always a function
If we take your 50 newton force at a 30 degree angle, sin(pi/6) is just a point on the sine curve described by (pi/6,sin(pi/6))
Yes, it is a ratio, but we can define f(x) to be (x^2-1)/(x-1). That's also a ratio. Is our example f(x) a function? Of course it is! And what will the answer to f(0)? 1. And that can be described by (0,f(0)). Similar to out sin point.

Saying that sine is SOMETIMES a function just simply complicates things. Why would you complicate something so beautiful?
User avatar #118 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
r u 2 gonna fuk or wat
User avatar #114 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You are drowning in your self taught calculus, i dont get why you can't accept this. But i find it funny you haven't brought out your strongest argument
User avatar #91 - xolotyl (12/13/2013) [-]
Wtf is with all these people who don't know shit about math? I've been reading most of the stuff you've been saying and I'm surprised people are still debating you
User avatar #92 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
People saw a video about math, and immediately thought they were professionals at the topic
User avatar #46 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Why do you have to go and bring polar equations into here to complicate things?

By the way, points in the polar plane are expressed by how far the point is away from the origin, and the angle measurement it is. This is extremely different to the Cartesian plane, where points are expressed by the dependent value for x, and the independent value for y. And guess what? The definition of a function relies on the Cartesian plane. Not the polar plane.

But, if you really want to, you can translate the polar points into Cartesian points
keisan.casio.com/has10/SpecExec.cgi?id=system/2006/1223050577

And also, by the way, the side lengths of the triangle relies on the angle measurement. The side lengths DEPEND on the angle measurement. While, the angle measurement is INDEPENDENT. Have you ever heard of those two words before? The DEPENDENT variable is on the y axis. While the INDEPENDENT variable is on the x axis. So, if we define the x axis to be radians, and if we define the y axis to be the sin(x). BOOM, we have a sin(x) curve. Giving us what appears to be a function. And guess what. IT IS A FUNCTION
User avatar #47 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Independent value of X and dependent value of Y* Sorry I'm tired
#27 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
i have to disagree with you, sin ALONE is not a function, but a ratio.

BUT
the definition of sin, opposite / hypotenuse = sin, is a function

so in a way, you are both right
User avatar #29 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
The value of the opposite and the hypotenuse is dependent of the value of x
#31 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
sorry, my mistake.
I meant:
opposite / hypotenuse = x = sin θ (the angle)

it (sin alone) is still not a function on its own, is my point.
User avatar #32 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
First I'm just going to point this out

math.stackexchange.com/questions/395600/how-does-a-calculator-calculate-the-sine-cosine-tangent-using-just-a-number

And the it is a function because if we draw it on an xy plane, but define the y axis as sin(x), and the x axis as the radians. It turns into the sin(x) curve.
Usually, the y axis is defined as a f(x) or something similar to that.
#33 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
Well yea, you are completely right about that.

What i am trying to point out, is the difference between the function sin x and the idea, the concept of sin. you cannot use sin without a variable in maths, you have to use sin x or sin y or whatever other symbol you deem fit.

just like you can use lim x → ∞, but not ∞ (the symbol for infinity)
User avatar #34 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Then what is my previous example f(x)=x^2+3
It requires a variable
User avatar #35 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
That, of course, is a function.
A quadratic function, at that.
How does that prove your point?
User avatar #36 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
You said that sin(x) isn't a function because it requires a variable.
Every single function ever requires at least one variable. Except of course for g(x)=C such that C is a constant.
User avatar #38 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
I think you are confusing me with that other guy you quarreled with, i never said that sin(x) was not a function
x is the variable in sin(x), rite?
User avatar #48 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Yeah, no idea what you mean. But, if you have further doubts. I suggest you either look in every math textbook ever. Or perhaps the internet.

lmgtfy.com/?q=Is+sin(x)+a+function%3F
User avatar #39 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
>you cannot use sin without a variable in maths

Pretty sure you said that, right?
User avatar #40 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
yes, i said that.
sin = no variable
sin(x) = variable
#20 - It is not a function, when i use it in engineering to get comp…  [+] (76 new replies) 12/12/2013 on I knew I was always doing... -1
User avatar #22 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Question:
What did I link you to?
It was a Wikipedia article about Trigonometric functions.
Have you looked at it?
Sin is the very first trig function it talked about.
Do you know what a function is?
It's an action on a variable. For example, in my previous example, I used f(x)=x^2+3
Sin is a function, because it's taking a right triangle with angle θ, and it's outputting the opposite side of the triangle over the hypotenuse
User avatar #23 - mcrut (12/12/2013) [-]
Hmmmm it still just doesn't seem right
User avatar #24 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Ok, define sin of x in your own words.
User avatar #25 - mcrut (12/12/2013) [-]
A representation of the ratio of the side opposite to the angle to the hypotenuse
User avatar #26 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
So, what you're saying is that sin(x)= opposite/hypotenuse
But, let's define some variables here. Opposite=A Hypotenuse=C Just for the sake of the Pythagorean theorem
Sin(x)= A/C
So, it's taking a value, X, and it's using that value, to make an output
That's what a function does.

But, if you still have doubts. Use one of the simplest methods to test if it is a function or not.
1) Graph Sin(x)
2) If there's any places on the graph, such that if you drew a vertical line, that it would intersect on two different points, then it isn't a function

Jesus Christ, how are you an engineer if you don't know that sin(x) is a function?
#54 - anonymous (12/12/2013) [-]
Actually, if I had to say something sinx=y is a function. Sine itself is not a function. It is an operation.
User avatar #57 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I already proved that wrong
And it is a function because if we drew it on an xy plane, but define the y axis as sin(x), and the x axis as the measurement of the angle in radians. It turns into the sin(x) curve.
Usually, the y axis is defined as a f(x) or something similar to that.
#41 - fillthisspace (12/12/2013) [-]
Just an A level maths student here....

So when you say that it isn't a function if it intersects at two point on a graph... Does that mean that the equation of a circle isn't a function?
User avatar #50 - thedudeistheman (12/12/2013) [-]
A circle isn't a function.
#62 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I never said a circle, I said the equation of a circle. Also, at least explain to me why it isn't a function

Like I said, just an A level maths student
User avatar #64 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
The equation for a circle produces a circle. If a circle isn't a function, how would the equation to produce the circle be a function?

A function is one-to-one, meaning each x-value has only one y-value. Several x-values of a circle have two y-values, making a circle not a function (if I'm not mistaken, every x-value in a circle has two y-values, but I'm not positive about that). This is where the Vertical Line Test comes into play. If you place a vertical line over anywhere on a graph and it's intersected by two values, the graphed equation and the equation itself is not a function.

On the other hand, a y-value can have more than one x-value.

In short, the equation of a circle and the resulting circle aren't functions.
#80 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I've been thinking of functions, until now, as number machines, put number in, get number out. Am I wrong to think that?
User avatar #89 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
No, I don't think it's wrong to think of it like that. But if you do think about it like that, you have to make sure it is actually a function before you make any assumptions about it.
#71 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Why is it that if it has two solutions or whatever then it isn't a function? Or is it kinda just a thing I'll have to accept?
User avatar #88 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
I learned why a while ago, but I don't remember. It has something to do with the fact of it being one-to-one, but I can't expand any further on that.
User avatar #43 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Haven't you people heard of the vertical line test? The equation for the unit circle (in the Cartesian plane) is
x^2+y^2=1
In no way is that a function
#63 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I've always thought of a function as a number machine, put number in, get number out... Am I wrong?
#60 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Ah, I've known the equation of a circle to be (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2 = r^2

Could you not have f(x) = (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2
Would that not give 2 solutions on the y axis?
I'm fucking clueless... Always have been with functions
User avatar #65 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
How are you an A level student in Math?
Let me make sure. The A levels is the equivalent to an AP course in math?
Is the education in the UK really that bad?

The equation of the circle is indeed (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2 = r^2
But, the unit circle is the circle with the center on the origin, and a radius of 1. So:
x^2+y^2=1
This circle is extremely important in trigonometry, as it's where all the math came from

Anyway, graph is a function if and only if there's only one value for y, for any given x.
Giving y an exponent generally give the graph two values for a given x.
#78 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I'm far from stupid, I got an A in GCSE and an A in Further Maths. Like I said, I was only asking about something I got confused on. No need to be an ass
User avatar #131 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
With anything except advice on girls
#74 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
No need for insults, only trying to understand something I got confused on. A level is split into two years, I'm in my first year (year 12 in education, so I'm 17). I've just never been explained to what a function actually is, I just kinda had to pick up the idea
User avatar #81 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Yeah, I'm 17 as well. Taught myself Calculus 1 a while ago. Self-studying Calculus 2. Also, I've been taught what a function is back at 7/8th grade
But really, if you don't know what a function, there's no possible way you could be doing higher level mathematics.
And I meant no disrespect to you. If you haven't been taught what a function is, that's a fault on your educational system.
#98 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
A level is split into two years, AS and A2. In AS Maths I have to do 2 core modules ( C1 and C2) and an extra module (a choice between mechanics, statistics and decision, my school chose statistics). In A2 I have to do another 2 core modules (C3 and C4) and an extra module (again a choice between statistics, mechanics and decision, my school chose mechanics). Someone in my year is very good at maths and he showed me what's in C3 and C4, and there's a lot of calculus I think. So I don't think that the education system is bad or failing me, or that I'm stupid and shouldn't be doing A level. It's just simply that we don't learn it until next year.
User avatar #127 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
If you don't truly understand the very basics. You'll never truly understand something like integration.
#128 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
But the thing is, I do know how to use functions, it's just your definition confused me. I've never heard of the line test and I didn't know it didn't have 2 values. Integration is in C3, which is next year. The basics are GCSE, Further Maths and what I'm learning now. Like I said, I can't know something I haven't learnt.
User avatar #129 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
Look, you need to have a better definition for things than just "number machine"
You're going to be taught integration next year, right?
People said integration is probably one of the most difficult things in calculus
There's absolutely no way in hell, could you understand integration, if you can't even understand what a function is.
Not because the definition of a function is needed to understand integration. But because you need to hold yourself to a higher standard and realize you need to understand things in a much more in depth look other than "a number machine"
Things are only going to get worse.
Hold yourself to a higher standard, so when shit hits the fan, you'll be prepared.

I may seem like an asshole. But I'm doing it for good intentions. To make you realize that you do not know anything compared to some people. Go further understand maths, and how beautiful of a subject it truly is.
#130 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
Well you seem to know what you're talking about, would you be able to help me?
User avatar #100 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Your explanation of functions is shit, by the way
Here's an explanation of functions:
A function is simply a series of operations given to a particular variable. The vertical line test states that if we drew a vertical line at any point on a graph, and it intersects between two points, then it isn't a function
So, imagine the graph, f(x)=x^2+3 in your head. Or better yet, here's a utility to graph it
www.desmos.com/calculator
So, draw a vertical line anywhere on that graph, it will obviously intersect at only one point, correct?
Now graph x^2+y^2=1
If we draw a vertical line almost anywhere on that graph, we see that it intersects at two points. What this means is that if we have an input inside the selected graph, than we'd have two outputs.
So yes, the equation of a circle is not a function

What this means in your example of the "number machine," is that if we put a number inside that "machine," we'll have two numbers that are outputed. Which doesn't make any sense.

But seriously. If you're studying higher level mathematics like calculus. They'll just laugh you out of colleges and universities if you define a function as a "number machine"
#124 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
I don't see why you have to put people down cause they're not as smart or some shit. It just makes you look like an asswipe.
User avatar #125 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
Because engineers need to make sure they won't give someone who is using a medical device, 500 cc's of morphine when they asked for 5. That as soon as their bridge is built, that it won't fall. That the skyscraper in the city won't immediately fall down, killing hundreds, if not, thousands.

A simple definition like "number machine" just won't cut it, even if it's just to help understand the topic. You need to know that your medical device won't overdose the patient. That your bridge won't fall. That your skyscraper will still remain in the sky.
#126 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
But the thing is, I'm not doing any of those things, I'm still learning. I can't know something I haven't learnt. I'm still in school. So really, putting someone down who is still in school for not knowing something is pointless. I may not be the smartest but I'm not dumb. Helping those people wanting to learn more instead of calling them stupid would be much more beneficial. I wasn't trying to prove you wrong or anything, I asked you something I wasn't quite sure on because you seemed to know what you're talking about.
#123 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
I don't need to define the maths, I just simply need to do it, which I can
#122 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
Obviously you can't read. I said I think of it as a number machine, I put x in and I get y out. I never said I define it as that, it's a way for me to understand it
User avatar #101 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
I am the highest level mathematics there is
User avatar #104 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I want your abortion.
User avatar #102 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
How many times have I, alone, mentioned you?
User avatar #103 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
a lot, you must really like me
#96 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Well it's not that I didn't know what one was, it's just I haven't had it really defined, and your explanation confused me. I've used functions and what not and done a bit of calculus in Further Maths. I'm assuming you like in America, I've always had the impression that Americans learn calculus really early. In the UK you don't get to it until A level, unless you do Further Maths, but even then, I look back on it and realise it wasn't hard, so I'm assuming it was at a low level
#97 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Live in America*
User avatar #94 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
too be honest, the difficulty of Calculus is really overrated.
mathematics are easy by that i mean i'll fuck anyone with a pussy
User avatar #99 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Not saying it was hard. Calculus 1 was extremely easy. Calculus 2 is kinda difficult. Definitely not as challenging as people make it to be
I'll fuck anything with something long protruding from it, or a pussy. Doesn't matter to me
User avatar #30 - mcrut (12/12/2013) [-]
and you are feeling proud over an internet argument, i had an idea in my head and i went with it, took a risk, found out i was wrong. maybe i learned something, maybe i didn't. Sin can be used as a function but it is not entirely a function. For example i will bring up to ways you can split up force vector. say you are given the force vector is given along a 345 triangle and another is set on a 30 60 90 degree triangle. I have a force of 50 newtons. If the 4 is the vertical side and all I want is the vertical component of that force i would multiply that by four and then divide it by 5, 40 newtons in the vertical up direction. If i was given that same force making a 30 angle above the horizontal and again i wanted the vertical component of the force, i would multiply the force of 50 newtons by sin(30) (or pi/6 if you use radians) and i would get 25 Newtons in the vertical direction. Let us look at a 30 60 90 triangle, also represented by a 1, Sqrt(3), 2 triangle. Do the same thing as with the 345 and you get 25 Newtons just like the sin(30) method! You see here that the ratio definition is perfectly fine. Also what do you get when you have r=sin(theta)? What is really a function then? Are you just sticking to the xyz coordinate system or are you actually thinking about different manners in which you can a apply it?
User avatar #52 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Oh, and by the way. Your idea was shit.
You should feel ashamed of yourself if you're an engineer and you don't know that the sine curve is a function
I'm not even sure you're an engineer, because that was just high school physics. It wasn't even advanced physics. Also, why did you use degrees? You obviously know about radians. Did you even take pre-calc? I mean, at least Precalc teaches you about functions.

Damn, go learn your shit, then state something on the internet.
User avatar #105 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I dont even know what to say, i agree that it is a curve and it can also be used in different ways. The fact you won't even accept what i am saying is true makes me question your knowledge. Have fun winning your internet fight.
User avatar #106 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I won't accept what you're saying because it's just plain wrong. Every mathematician, every engineer, every physicist, everybody with a slight amount of credible education in mathematics in a credible university would say that sin is a function
It's just is. There's no arguing with that.
And, please tell me you're not actually a engineer. Because I'll fear for my life every time I walk across a bridge or something like that. To know there's engineers that didn't know sin is a function.
User avatar #115 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
dude, i am 87% sure that he's a troll. cuz no one is that stupid.
User avatar #116 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
He's level 223. He's a blue name. His recent comments aren't troll-like. He became so mad he thumbed down my comments. So, I'm not particularly sure he's trolling
But, since this debate ran on until we've reached out max replies. You might be right.

But, I hope to god that he doesn't get a job in anything slightly related to math.
User avatar #117 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
it's still possible. for example i have another account which have a blue name and is pretty high leveled, but some times i still troll just for fun. also, because i have a blue name, people don't usually see realize that i was trolling.
User avatar #119 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
in fact you pretty much have to have a older account to troll properly. take this comment for example, I have a troll name and a level of -250. people will realize that i'm a troll in an instant, and trolling is most effective when the other party don't realize anything.

troll accounts aren't for trolling but for shitposting and annoying other users with shits such as "lol, I just thumbed you down, asstwat.
#120 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
he trolls
User avatar #107 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You said you are 17, well i am twenty and just finishing up my third semester. I have taken courses that would make you scream in the night. I passed calc 1 in highschool and blazed through calc II in college. I munched on diff eq easily getting no less than a 92 on an exam in diff eq and that is some pure math and is also passing calc III as we speak. Please dont discredit a person who has just seen the brink of pain. I have passed physics one for engineers, and on my way to physics 2 this next week. I passed a class called statics which was extremely difficult, and currently passing a class called dynamics in which my instructor says was the hardest undergrad class he took and he has his masters in mechanical. Shut your fucking mouth, 17, where are you from and what have you taken to think you can tell what is what?
User avatar #108 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Dude. I've taught myself college level physics when I was in 8th grade. I went on to particle physics in my freshmen year in high school while simultaneously learning Calculus including all of my high school courses. In the years that followed, I have not taken a single college level course, even though I expected myself to continue studying college level Chemistry, Computer Science, Programming, Biology, while of course, studying Calculus 2. I know 5 programming languages by heart, and developed programs that could compete with Mathematica if I released them.

I know just below the same information as you. But, I'm still a senior in high school.
So yeah.
User avatar #109 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I heard was Bullshit from that comment. I am starting to smell the troll now. What proof do you have for me? And it better be good damn proof.
User avatar #111 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
And yeah, I must be a troll because I know college level courses.
It's possible to know higher level calculus at a younger age.
Einstein knew differential/integral calculus before he was 15. (I'm not comparing myself to Einstein, he's incredibly more intelligent than I am. Even though he used explosions in his thought experiment to disprove quantum theory. Which is kind of idiotic if you think about it. I'd much rather have Schrodinger's cat)
User avatar #110 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I didn't take a class. So, there's no particular proof I can give.
I can show you my knowledge of physics since that's my favorite subject. But, there's nothing you can ask me that I won't be able to find on the internet.

But still
lmgtfy.com/?q=trigonometric+function&l=1
User avatar #112 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
Why cant you accept that it is not always a function?
User avatar #113 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Because it is always a function
If we take your 50 newton force at a 30 degree angle, sin(pi/6) is just a point on the sine curve described by (pi/6,sin(pi/6))
Yes, it is a ratio, but we can define f(x) to be (x^2-1)/(x-1). That's also a ratio. Is our example f(x) a function? Of course it is! And what will the answer to f(0)? 1. And that can be described by (0,f(0)). Similar to out sin point.

Saying that sine is SOMETIMES a function just simply complicates things. Why would you complicate something so beautiful?
User avatar #118 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
r u 2 gonna fuk or wat
User avatar #114 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You are drowning in your self taught calculus, i dont get why you can't accept this. But i find it funny you haven't brought out your strongest argument
User avatar #91 - xolotyl (12/13/2013) [-]
Wtf is with all these people who don't know shit about math? I've been reading most of the stuff you've been saying and I'm surprised people are still debating you
User avatar #92 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
People saw a video about math, and immediately thought they were professionals at the topic
User avatar #46 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Why do you have to go and bring polar equations into here to complicate things?

By the way, points in the polar plane are expressed by how far the point is away from the origin, and the angle measurement it is. This is extremely different to the Cartesian plane, where points are expressed by the dependent value for x, and the independent value for y. And guess what? The definition of a function relies on the Cartesian plane. Not the polar plane.

But, if you really want to, you can translate the polar points into Cartesian points
keisan.casio.com/has10/SpecExec.cgi?id=system/2006/1223050577

And also, by the way, the side lengths of the triangle relies on the angle measurement. The side lengths DEPEND on the angle measurement. While, the angle measurement is INDEPENDENT. Have you ever heard of those two words before? The DEPENDENT variable is on the y axis. While the INDEPENDENT variable is on the x axis. So, if we define the x axis to be radians, and if we define the y axis to be the sin(x). BOOM, we have a sin(x) curve. Giving us what appears to be a function. And guess what. IT IS A FUNCTION
User avatar #47 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Independent value of X and dependent value of Y* Sorry I'm tired
#27 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
i have to disagree with you, sin ALONE is not a function, but a ratio.

BUT
the definition of sin, opposite / hypotenuse = sin, is a function

so in a way, you are both right
User avatar #29 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
The value of the opposite and the hypotenuse is dependent of the value of x
#31 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
sorry, my mistake.
I meant:
opposite / hypotenuse = x = sin θ (the angle)

it (sin alone) is still not a function on its own, is my point.
User avatar #32 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
First I'm just going to point this out

math.stackexchange.com/questions/395600/how-does-a-calculator-calculate-the-sine-cosine-tangent-using-just-a-number

And the it is a function because if we draw it on an xy plane, but define the y axis as sin(x), and the x axis as the radians. It turns into the sin(x) curve.
Usually, the y axis is defined as a f(x) or something similar to that.
#33 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
Well yea, you are completely right about that.

What i am trying to point out, is the difference between the function sin x and the idea, the concept of sin. you cannot use sin without a variable in maths, you have to use sin x or sin y or whatever other symbol you deem fit.

just like you can use lim x → ∞, but not ∞ (the symbol for infinity)
User avatar #34 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Then what is my previous example f(x)=x^2+3
It requires a variable
User avatar #35 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
That, of course, is a function.
A quadratic function, at that.
How does that prove your point?
User avatar #36 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
You said that sin(x) isn't a function because it requires a variable.
Every single function ever requires at least one variable. Except of course for g(x)=C such that C is a constant.
User avatar #38 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
I think you are confusing me with that other guy you quarreled with, i never said that sin(x) was not a function
x is the variable in sin(x), rite?
User avatar #48 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Yeah, no idea what you mean. But, if you have further doubts. I suggest you either look in every math textbook ever. Or perhaps the internet.

lmgtfy.com/?q=Is+sin(x)+a+function%3F
User avatar #39 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
>you cannot use sin without a variable in maths

Pretty sure you said that, right?
User avatar #40 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
yes, i said that.
sin = no variable
sin(x) = variable
#18 - As an engineering student this makes me cringe slightly 12/12/2013 on I knew I was always doing... -3
#17 - sin really isn't a function, it represents the ratio of a side…  [+] (80 new replies) 12/12/2013 on I knew I was always doing... 0
User avatar #37 - yetaxaa (12/12/2013) [-]
sin, while derived from the ratio of a side opposite to the hypotenuse, IS a function.
It even has a power series expansion which looks more like a regular function
sin(x) = x - (x^3)/3! + (x^5)/5! - ...
In pure mathematics, it is a function.
User avatar #95 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
yep, i invented that function. it's pure me.
User avatar #20 - mcrut (12/12/2013) [-]
It is not a function, when i use it in engineering to get components of forces and velocities it is simply used as a ratio that gives me a part of those velocities or forces. Simply linking me to a wiki article that you have no part of shows me that you have no argument here.
User avatar #22 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Question:
What did I link you to?
It was a Wikipedia article about Trigonometric functions.
Have you looked at it?
Sin is the very first trig function it talked about.
Do you know what a function is?
It's an action on a variable. For example, in my previous example, I used f(x)=x^2+3
Sin is a function, because it's taking a right triangle with angle θ, and it's outputting the opposite side of the triangle over the hypotenuse
User avatar #23 - mcrut (12/12/2013) [-]
Hmmmm it still just doesn't seem right
User avatar #24 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Ok, define sin of x in your own words.
User avatar #25 - mcrut (12/12/2013) [-]
A representation of the ratio of the side opposite to the angle to the hypotenuse
User avatar #26 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
So, what you're saying is that sin(x)= opposite/hypotenuse
But, let's define some variables here. Opposite=A Hypotenuse=C Just for the sake of the Pythagorean theorem
Sin(x)= A/C
So, it's taking a value, X, and it's using that value, to make an output
That's what a function does.

But, if you still have doubts. Use one of the simplest methods to test if it is a function or not.
1) Graph Sin(x)
2) If there's any places on the graph, such that if you drew a vertical line, that it would intersect on two different points, then it isn't a function

Jesus Christ, how are you an engineer if you don't know that sin(x) is a function?
#54 - anonymous (12/12/2013) [-]
Actually, if I had to say something sinx=y is a function. Sine itself is not a function. It is an operation.
User avatar #57 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I already proved that wrong
And it is a function because if we drew it on an xy plane, but define the y axis as sin(x), and the x axis as the measurement of the angle in radians. It turns into the sin(x) curve.
Usually, the y axis is defined as a f(x) or something similar to that.
#41 - fillthisspace (12/12/2013) [-]
Just an A level maths student here....

So when you say that it isn't a function if it intersects at two point on a graph... Does that mean that the equation of a circle isn't a function?
User avatar #50 - thedudeistheman (12/12/2013) [-]
A circle isn't a function.
#62 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I never said a circle, I said the equation of a circle. Also, at least explain to me why it isn't a function

Like I said, just an A level maths student
User avatar #64 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
The equation for a circle produces a circle. If a circle isn't a function, how would the equation to produce the circle be a function?

A function is one-to-one, meaning each x-value has only one y-value. Several x-values of a circle have two y-values, making a circle not a function (if I'm not mistaken, every x-value in a circle has two y-values, but I'm not positive about that). This is where the Vertical Line Test comes into play. If you place a vertical line over anywhere on a graph and it's intersected by two values, the graphed equation and the equation itself is not a function.

On the other hand, a y-value can have more than one x-value.

In short, the equation of a circle and the resulting circle aren't functions.
#80 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I've been thinking of functions, until now, as number machines, put number in, get number out. Am I wrong to think that?
User avatar #89 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
No, I don't think it's wrong to think of it like that. But if you do think about it like that, you have to make sure it is actually a function before you make any assumptions about it.
#71 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Why is it that if it has two solutions or whatever then it isn't a function? Or is it kinda just a thing I'll have to accept?
User avatar #88 - thedudeistheman (12/13/2013) [-]
I learned why a while ago, but I don't remember. It has something to do with the fact of it being one-to-one, but I can't expand any further on that.
User avatar #43 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Haven't you people heard of the vertical line test? The equation for the unit circle (in the Cartesian plane) is
x^2+y^2=1
In no way is that a function
#63 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I've always thought of a function as a number machine, put number in, get number out... Am I wrong?
#60 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Ah, I've known the equation of a circle to be (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2 = r^2

Could you not have f(x) = (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2
Would that not give 2 solutions on the y axis?
I'm fucking clueless... Always have been with functions
User avatar #65 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
How are you an A level student in Math?
Let me make sure. The A levels is the equivalent to an AP course in math?
Is the education in the UK really that bad?

The equation of the circle is indeed (x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2 = r^2
But, the unit circle is the circle with the center on the origin, and a radius of 1. So:
x^2+y^2=1
This circle is extremely important in trigonometry, as it's where all the math came from

Anyway, graph is a function if and only if there's only one value for y, for any given x.
Giving y an exponent generally give the graph two values for a given x.
#78 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
I'm far from stupid, I got an A in GCSE and an A in Further Maths. Like I said, I was only asking about something I got confused on. No need to be an ass
User avatar #131 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
With anything except advice on girls
#74 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
No need for insults, only trying to understand something I got confused on. A level is split into two years, I'm in my first year (year 12 in education, so I'm 17). I've just never been explained to what a function actually is, I just kinda had to pick up the idea
User avatar #81 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Yeah, I'm 17 as well. Taught myself Calculus 1 a while ago. Self-studying Calculus 2. Also, I've been taught what a function is back at 7/8th grade
But really, if you don't know what a function, there's no possible way you could be doing higher level mathematics.
And I meant no disrespect to you. If you haven't been taught what a function is, that's a fault on your educational system.
#98 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
A level is split into two years, AS and A2. In AS Maths I have to do 2 core modules ( C1 and C2) and an extra module (a choice between mechanics, statistics and decision, my school chose statistics). In A2 I have to do another 2 core modules (C3 and C4) and an extra module (again a choice between statistics, mechanics and decision, my school chose mechanics). Someone in my year is very good at maths and he showed me what's in C3 and C4, and there's a lot of calculus I think. So I don't think that the education system is bad or failing me, or that I'm stupid and shouldn't be doing A level. It's just simply that we don't learn it until next year.
User avatar #127 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
If you don't truly understand the very basics. You'll never truly understand something like integration.
#128 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
But the thing is, I do know how to use functions, it's just your definition confused me. I've never heard of the line test and I didn't know it didn't have 2 values. Integration is in C3, which is next year. The basics are GCSE, Further Maths and what I'm learning now. Like I said, I can't know something I haven't learnt.
User avatar #129 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
Look, you need to have a better definition for things than just "number machine"
You're going to be taught integration next year, right?
People said integration is probably one of the most difficult things in calculus
There's absolutely no way in hell, could you understand integration, if you can't even understand what a function is.
Not because the definition of a function is needed to understand integration. But because you need to hold yourself to a higher standard and realize you need to understand things in a much more in depth look other than "a number machine"
Things are only going to get worse.
Hold yourself to a higher standard, so when shit hits the fan, you'll be prepared.

I may seem like an asshole. But I'm doing it for good intentions. To make you realize that you do not know anything compared to some people. Go further understand maths, and how beautiful of a subject it truly is.
#130 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
Well you seem to know what you're talking about, would you be able to help me?
User avatar #100 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Your explanation of functions is shit, by the way
Here's an explanation of functions:
A function is simply a series of operations given to a particular variable. The vertical line test states that if we drew a vertical line at any point on a graph, and it intersects between two points, then it isn't a function
So, imagine the graph, f(x)=x^2+3 in your head. Or better yet, here's a utility to graph it
www.desmos.com/calculator
So, draw a vertical line anywhere on that graph, it will obviously intersect at only one point, correct?
Now graph x^2+y^2=1
If we draw a vertical line almost anywhere on that graph, we see that it intersects at two points. What this means is that if we have an input inside the selected graph, than we'd have two outputs.
So yes, the equation of a circle is not a function

What this means in your example of the "number machine," is that if we put a number inside that "machine," we'll have two numbers that are outputed. Which doesn't make any sense.

But seriously. If you're studying higher level mathematics like calculus. They'll just laugh you out of colleges and universities if you define a function as a "number machine"
#124 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
I don't see why you have to put people down cause they're not as smart or some shit. It just makes you look like an asswipe.
User avatar #125 - lech (12/14/2013) [-]
Because engineers need to make sure they won't give someone who is using a medical device, 500 cc's of morphine when they asked for 5. That as soon as their bridge is built, that it won't fall. That the skyscraper in the city won't immediately fall down, killing hundreds, if not, thousands.

A simple definition like "number machine" just won't cut it, even if it's just to help understand the topic. You need to know that your medical device won't overdose the patient. That your bridge won't fall. That your skyscraper will still remain in the sky.
#126 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
But the thing is, I'm not doing any of those things, I'm still learning. I can't know something I haven't learnt. I'm still in school. So really, putting someone down who is still in school for not knowing something is pointless. I may not be the smartest but I'm not dumb. Helping those people wanting to learn more instead of calling them stupid would be much more beneficial. I wasn't trying to prove you wrong or anything, I asked you something I wasn't quite sure on because you seemed to know what you're talking about.
#123 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
I don't need to define the maths, I just simply need to do it, which I can
#122 - fillthisspace (12/14/2013) [-]
Obviously you can't read. I said I think of it as a number machine, I put x in and I get y out. I never said I define it as that, it's a way for me to understand it
User avatar #101 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
I am the highest level mathematics there is
User avatar #104 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I want your abortion.
User avatar #102 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
How many times have I, alone, mentioned you?
User avatar #103 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
a lot, you must really like me
#96 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Well it's not that I didn't know what one was, it's just I haven't had it really defined, and your explanation confused me. I've used functions and what not and done a bit of calculus in Further Maths. I'm assuming you like in America, I've always had the impression that Americans learn calculus really early. In the UK you don't get to it until A level, unless you do Further Maths, but even then, I look back on it and realise it wasn't hard, so I'm assuming it was at a low level
#97 - fillthisspace (12/13/2013) [-]
Live in America*
User avatar #94 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
too be honest, the difficulty of Calculus is really overrated.
mathematics are easy by that i mean i'll fuck anyone with a pussy
User avatar #99 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Not saying it was hard. Calculus 1 was extremely easy. Calculus 2 is kinda difficult. Definitely not as challenging as people make it to be
I'll fuck anything with something long protruding from it, or a pussy. Doesn't matter to me
User avatar #30 - mcrut (12/12/2013) [-]
and you are feeling proud over an internet argument, i had an idea in my head and i went with it, took a risk, found out i was wrong. maybe i learned something, maybe i didn't. Sin can be used as a function but it is not entirely a function. For example i will bring up to ways you can split up force vector. say you are given the force vector is given along a 345 triangle and another is set on a 30 60 90 degree triangle. I have a force of 50 newtons. If the 4 is the vertical side and all I want is the vertical component of that force i would multiply that by four and then divide it by 5, 40 newtons in the vertical up direction. If i was given that same force making a 30 angle above the horizontal and again i wanted the vertical component of the force, i would multiply the force of 50 newtons by sin(30) (or pi/6 if you use radians) and i would get 25 Newtons in the vertical direction. Let us look at a 30 60 90 triangle, also represented by a 1, Sqrt(3), 2 triangle. Do the same thing as with the 345 and you get 25 Newtons just like the sin(30) method! You see here that the ratio definition is perfectly fine. Also what do you get when you have r=sin(theta)? What is really a function then? Are you just sticking to the xyz coordinate system or are you actually thinking about different manners in which you can a apply it?
User avatar #52 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Oh, and by the way. Your idea was shit.
You should feel ashamed of yourself if you're an engineer and you don't know that the sine curve is a function
I'm not even sure you're an engineer, because that was just high school physics. It wasn't even advanced physics. Also, why did you use degrees? You obviously know about radians. Did you even take pre-calc? I mean, at least Precalc teaches you about functions.

Damn, go learn your shit, then state something on the internet.
User avatar #105 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I dont even know what to say, i agree that it is a curve and it can also be used in different ways. The fact you won't even accept what i am saying is true makes me question your knowledge. Have fun winning your internet fight.
User avatar #106 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I won't accept what you're saying because it's just plain wrong. Every mathematician, every engineer, every physicist, everybody with a slight amount of credible education in mathematics in a credible university would say that sin is a function
It's just is. There's no arguing with that.
And, please tell me you're not actually a engineer. Because I'll fear for my life every time I walk across a bridge or something like that. To know there's engineers that didn't know sin is a function.
User avatar #115 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
dude, i am 87% sure that he's a troll. cuz no one is that stupid.
User avatar #116 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
He's level 223. He's a blue name. His recent comments aren't troll-like. He became so mad he thumbed down my comments. So, I'm not particularly sure he's trolling
But, since this debate ran on until we've reached out max replies. You might be right.

But, I hope to god that he doesn't get a job in anything slightly related to math.
User avatar #117 - mathematics (12/13/2013) [-]
it's still possible. for example i have another account which have a blue name and is pretty high leveled, but some times i still troll just for fun. also, because i have a blue name, people don't usually see realize that i was trolling.
User avatar #119 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
in fact you pretty much have to have a older account to troll properly. take this comment for example, I have a troll name and a level of -250. people will realize that i'm a troll in an instant, and trolling is most effective when the other party don't realize anything.

troll accounts aren't for trolling but for shitposting and annoying other users with shits such as "lol, I just thumbed you down, asstwat.
#120 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
he trolls
User avatar #107 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You said you are 17, well i am twenty and just finishing up my third semester. I have taken courses that would make you scream in the night. I passed calc 1 in highschool and blazed through calc II in college. I munched on diff eq easily getting no less than a 92 on an exam in diff eq and that is some pure math and is also passing calc III as we speak. Please dont discredit a person who has just seen the brink of pain. I have passed physics one for engineers, and on my way to physics 2 this next week. I passed a class called statics which was extremely difficult, and currently passing a class called dynamics in which my instructor says was the hardest undergrad class he took and he has his masters in mechanical. Shut your fucking mouth, 17, where are you from and what have you taken to think you can tell what is what?
User avatar #108 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Dude. I've taught myself college level physics when I was in 8th grade. I went on to particle physics in my freshmen year in high school while simultaneously learning Calculus including all of my high school courses. In the years that followed, I have not taken a single college level course, even though I expected myself to continue studying college level Chemistry, Computer Science, Programming, Biology, while of course, studying Calculus 2. I know 5 programming languages by heart, and developed programs that could compete with Mathematica if I released them.

I know just below the same information as you. But, I'm still a senior in high school.
So yeah.
User avatar #109 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
I heard was Bullshit from that comment. I am starting to smell the troll now. What proof do you have for me? And it better be good damn proof.
User avatar #111 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
And yeah, I must be a troll because I know college level courses.
It's possible to know higher level calculus at a younger age.
Einstein knew differential/integral calculus before he was 15. (I'm not comparing myself to Einstein, he's incredibly more intelligent than I am. Even though he used explosions in his thought experiment to disprove quantum theory. Which is kind of idiotic if you think about it. I'd much rather have Schrodinger's cat)
User avatar #110 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
I didn't take a class. So, there's no particular proof I can give.
I can show you my knowledge of physics since that's my favorite subject. But, there's nothing you can ask me that I won't be able to find on the internet.

But still
lmgtfy.com/?q=trigonometric+function&l=1
User avatar #112 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
Why cant you accept that it is not always a function?
User avatar #113 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
Because it is always a function
If we take your 50 newton force at a 30 degree angle, sin(pi/6) is just a point on the sine curve described by (pi/6,sin(pi/6))
Yes, it is a ratio, but we can define f(x) to be (x^2-1)/(x-1). That's also a ratio. Is our example f(x) a function? Of course it is! And what will the answer to f(0)? 1. And that can be described by (0,f(0)). Similar to out sin point.

Saying that sine is SOMETIMES a function just simply complicates things. Why would you complicate something so beautiful?
User avatar #118 - jbgotswag (12/13/2013) [-]
r u 2 gonna fuk or wat
User avatar #114 - mcrut (12/13/2013) [-]
You are drowning in your self taught calculus, i dont get why you can't accept this. But i find it funny you haven't brought out your strongest argument
User avatar #91 - xolotyl (12/13/2013) [-]
Wtf is with all these people who don't know shit about math? I've been reading most of the stuff you've been saying and I'm surprised people are still debating you
User avatar #92 - lech (12/13/2013) [-]
People saw a video about math, and immediately thought they were professionals at the topic
User avatar #46 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Why do you have to go and bring polar equations into here to complicate things?

By the way, points in the polar plane are expressed by how far the point is away from the origin, and the angle measurement it is. This is extremely different to the Cartesian plane, where points are expressed by the dependent value for x, and the independent value for y. And guess what? The definition of a function relies on the Cartesian plane. Not the polar plane.

But, if you really want to, you can translate the polar points into Cartesian points
keisan.casio.com/has10/SpecExec.cgi?id=system/2006/1223050577

And also, by the way, the side lengths of the triangle relies on the angle measurement. The side lengths DEPEND on the angle measurement. While, the angle measurement is INDEPENDENT. Have you ever heard of those two words before? The DEPENDENT variable is on the y axis. While the INDEPENDENT variable is on the x axis. So, if we define the x axis to be radians, and if we define the y axis to be the sin(x). BOOM, we have a sin(x) curve. Giving us what appears to be a function. And guess what. IT IS A FUNCTION
User avatar #47 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Independent value of X and dependent value of Y* Sorry I'm tired
#27 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
i have to disagree with you, sin ALONE is not a function, but a ratio.

BUT
the definition of sin, opposite / hypotenuse = sin, is a function

so in a way, you are both right
User avatar #29 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
The value of the opposite and the hypotenuse is dependent of the value of x
#31 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
sorry, my mistake.
I meant:
opposite / hypotenuse = x = sin θ (the angle)

it (sin alone) is still not a function on its own, is my point.
User avatar #32 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
First I'm just going to point this out

math.stackexchange.com/questions/395600/how-does-a-calculator-calculate-the-sine-cosine-tangent-using-just-a-number

And the it is a function because if we draw it on an xy plane, but define the y axis as sin(x), and the x axis as the radians. It turns into the sin(x) curve.
Usually, the y axis is defined as a f(x) or something similar to that.
#33 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
Well yea, you are completely right about that.

What i am trying to point out, is the difference between the function sin x and the idea, the concept of sin. you cannot use sin without a variable in maths, you have to use sin x or sin y or whatever other symbol you deem fit.

just like you can use lim x → ∞, but not ∞ (the symbol for infinity)
User avatar #34 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Then what is my previous example f(x)=x^2+3
It requires a variable
User avatar #35 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
That, of course, is a function.
A quadratic function, at that.
How does that prove your point?
User avatar #36 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
You said that sin(x) isn't a function because it requires a variable.
Every single function ever requires at least one variable. Except of course for g(x)=C such that C is a constant.
User avatar #38 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
I think you are confusing me with that other guy you quarreled with, i never said that sin(x) was not a function
x is the variable in sin(x), rite?
User avatar #48 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
Yeah, no idea what you mean. But, if you have further doubts. I suggest you either look in every math textbook ever. Or perhaps the internet.

lmgtfy.com/?q=Is+sin(x)+a+function%3F
User avatar #39 - lech (12/12/2013) [-]
>you cannot use sin without a variable in maths

Pretty sure you said that, right?
User avatar #40 - meitemark (12/12/2013) [-]
yes, i said that.
sin = no variable
sin(x) = variable
#292 - And my dad actually when i was older so about 10ish would take… 12/12/2013 on Abuse 0
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User avatar #292 - mcrut (12/12/2013) [-]
And my dad actually when i was older so about 10ish would take a drop of tobasco sauce and put it on my tongue. That was good enough to get me good
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#73 - so that is what that fin is for.... 12/12/2013 on Pretty Sweet +1
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#4 - datgrass (06/25/2014) [-]
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User avatar #1 - soundofwinter (06/21/2014) [-]
fuck you
User avatar #2 to #1 - mcrut (06/21/2014) [-]
Atta boy OP
 
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