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martycamp    

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martycamp Avatar Level 316 Comments: Wizard
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Gender: male
Age: 21
Consoles Owned: PS3, GameCube
Video Games Played: Skyrim, Assassin's Creed, Mass Effect
Interests: Reading, Writing, Masturbating, Videogames
Date Signed Up:3/05/2012
Last Login:11/26/2014
Location:Scotland
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Content Ranking:#10589
Comment Ranking:#7057
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Highest Comment Rank:#171
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Level 140 Content: Faptastic → Level 141 Content: Faptastic
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I'm a genetics student at the University of Glasgow. I like to think I'm funny, and like to laugh, so here I am

latest user's comments

#69 - That's actually pretty impressive.  [+] (8 new replies) 04/25/2014 on 5 Seconds Without Oxygen +1
User avatar #72 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
I suppose.

It's just a bit of object oriented modeling, really. Once you understand the purpose of the link dependent growth algorithms used in the physics-y part to generate social networks, it's just a matter of setting boundaries based on viable spawning areas, planting a founder population, and adding in behavioral modifications for the population based on the real frogs.

I mean, what's the point of having all of this nifty knowledge if I can't use it for world domination cool science stuff?
User avatar #73 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
Actually applying knowledge is why I'm wanting to go into synthetic biology after I graduate. It appeals to me more than research
User avatar #74 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
Well, that will be an awesome career path. Synthetic biology is pretty much always exciting.

Personally, I just want to end up teaching at an R1 institution, where I can teach a few classes, and have my own lab in which to do behavioral neuroscience. Encephalopods, how do they think?! seriously though. The giant octopus eats its dead mother as a first meal, has a 2-5 year lifespan, and is mostly solitary, yet those crafty motherfuckers seek out interaction with handlers, remember and behave different according to the individual, are capable of learning commands, and adapt surprisingly well to life in captivity,even with other octopi. And all this with an abysmal encephalization quotient, and a cortex largely devoted to visual processing.
User avatar #75 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
That definitely sounds interesting. You might end up discovering the secret behind intelligence!
User avatar #79 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
Well, obviously it's magic.

Or an emergent effect of neural plasticity and whatever mechanisms underlie behavioral flexibility and social cognition. That could work too, among other things.
User avatar #83 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
Could they act differently for different people due to their visual processing? They see people they recognise, so they act a certain way.
User avatar #90 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
to a certain extent, yes. They have amazing visual acuity.

But, there was a study in which different handlers would either always feed, or always antagonize specific octopi. Not only did each octopus change their color and patterning in response to a recognized handler, but they would actively avoid the ones that antagonized them, and approach the ones that fed and played with them. That, and the handlers weren't required to wear the same thing every day, so it's assumed that they remember their faces and other such complex details.
They also have subtle patterning differences corresponding to individual trainers; so its clear that they recognize and behave according to the individual they're dealing with. They do the same thing with other members of their own species.
User avatar #135 - snowshark (04/26/2014) [-]
Would both you and Martycamp stop being so fucking impressive for like, two minutes?!

It is thoroughly emasculating!
#66 - You should probably get on that. It sounds important  [+] (10 new replies) 04/25/2014 on 5 Seconds Without Oxygen +1
User avatar #68 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
you would think that, and you would be correct.

but hey, at least I mostly finished turning my friend's physics thesis in complex network formation into a viable theoretical model for population distributions of threatened frog species, which is currently able to predict the impact of population sinks (areas attractive to a species for breeding/ settling that ultimately result in death), using real-world data for 10000 meter survey sites in NY state.

... so there's that. Might be a bit late with thesis, but if I can refine this model, I could also get another publication in before I take a year off / head to grad school.
User avatar #69 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
That's actually pretty impressive.
User avatar #72 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
I suppose.

It's just a bit of object oriented modeling, really. Once you understand the purpose of the link dependent growth algorithms used in the physics-y part to generate social networks, it's just a matter of setting boundaries based on viable spawning areas, planting a founder population, and adding in behavioral modifications for the population based on the real frogs.

I mean, what's the point of having all of this nifty knowledge if I can't use it for world domination cool science stuff?
User avatar #73 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
Actually applying knowledge is why I'm wanting to go into synthetic biology after I graduate. It appeals to me more than research
User avatar #74 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
Well, that will be an awesome career path. Synthetic biology is pretty much always exciting.

Personally, I just want to end up teaching at an R1 institution, where I can teach a few classes, and have my own lab in which to do behavioral neuroscience. Encephalopods, how do they think?! seriously though. The giant octopus eats its dead mother as a first meal, has a 2-5 year lifespan, and is mostly solitary, yet those crafty motherfuckers seek out interaction with handlers, remember and behave different according to the individual, are capable of learning commands, and adapt surprisingly well to life in captivity,even with other octopi. And all this with an abysmal encephalization quotient, and a cortex largely devoted to visual processing.
User avatar #75 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
That definitely sounds interesting. You might end up discovering the secret behind intelligence!
User avatar #79 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
Well, obviously it's magic.

Or an emergent effect of neural plasticity and whatever mechanisms underlie behavioral flexibility and social cognition. That could work too, among other things.
User avatar #83 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
Could they act differently for different people due to their visual processing? They see people they recognise, so they act a certain way.
User avatar #90 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
to a certain extent, yes. They have amazing visual acuity.

But, there was a study in which different handlers would either always feed, or always antagonize specific octopi. Not only did each octopus change their color and patterning in response to a recognized handler, but they would actively avoid the ones that antagonized them, and approach the ones that fed and played with them. That, and the handlers weren't required to wear the same thing every day, so it's assumed that they remember their faces and other such complex details.
They also have subtle patterning differences corresponding to individual trainers; so its clear that they recognize and behave according to the individual they're dealing with. They do the same thing with other members of their own species.
User avatar #135 - snowshark (04/26/2014) [-]
Would both you and Martycamp stop being so fucking impressive for like, two minutes?!

It is thoroughly emasculating!
#27 - It's cool  [+] (1 new reply) 04/25/2014 on must be love +29
#29 - foxxywithpaws (04/25/2014) [-]
OHOHO, is funny because penguins live in the cooold!
#62 - You must atone for your mistake. It is not too late to regain …  [+] (13 new replies) 04/25/2014 on 5 Seconds Without Oxygen +1
User avatar #65 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
but first I'll just ... finish writing my neuroscience thesis that totally wasn't supposed to be in as a mostly final draft ten hours ago.
User avatar #66 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
You should probably get on that. It sounds important
User avatar #68 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
you would think that, and you would be correct.

but hey, at least I mostly finished turning my friend's physics thesis in complex network formation into a viable theoretical model for population distributions of threatened frog species, which is currently able to predict the impact of population sinks (areas attractive to a species for breeding/ settling that ultimately result in death), using real-world data for 10000 meter survey sites in NY state.

... so there's that. Might be a bit late with thesis, but if I can refine this model, I could also get another publication in before I take a year off / head to grad school.
User avatar #69 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
That's actually pretty impressive.
User avatar #72 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
I suppose.

It's just a bit of object oriented modeling, really. Once you understand the purpose of the link dependent growth algorithms used in the physics-y part to generate social networks, it's just a matter of setting boundaries based on viable spawning areas, planting a founder population, and adding in behavioral modifications for the population based on the real frogs.

I mean, what's the point of having all of this nifty knowledge if I can't use it for world domination cool science stuff?
User avatar #73 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
Actually applying knowledge is why I'm wanting to go into synthetic biology after I graduate. It appeals to me more than research
User avatar #74 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
Well, that will be an awesome career path. Synthetic biology is pretty much always exciting.

Personally, I just want to end up teaching at an R1 institution, where I can teach a few classes, and have my own lab in which to do behavioral neuroscience. Encephalopods, how do they think?! seriously though. The giant octopus eats its dead mother as a first meal, has a 2-5 year lifespan, and is mostly solitary, yet those crafty motherfuckers seek out interaction with handlers, remember and behave different according to the individual, are capable of learning commands, and adapt surprisingly well to life in captivity,even with other octopi. And all this with an abysmal encephalization quotient, and a cortex largely devoted to visual processing.
User avatar #75 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
That definitely sounds interesting. You might end up discovering the secret behind intelligence!
User avatar #79 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
Well, obviously it's magic.

Or an emergent effect of neural plasticity and whatever mechanisms underlie behavioral flexibility and social cognition. That could work too, among other things.
User avatar #83 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
Could they act differently for different people due to their visual processing? They see people they recognise, so they act a certain way.
User avatar #90 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
to a certain extent, yes. They have amazing visual acuity.

But, there was a study in which different handlers would either always feed, or always antagonize specific octopi. Not only did each octopus change their color and patterning in response to a recognized handler, but they would actively avoid the ones that antagonized them, and approach the ones that fed and played with them. That, and the handlers weren't required to wear the same thing every day, so it's assumed that they remember their faces and other such complex details.
They also have subtle patterning differences corresponding to individual trainers; so its clear that they recognize and behave according to the individual they're dealing with. They do the same thing with other members of their own species.
User avatar #135 - snowshark (04/26/2014) [-]
Would both you and Martycamp stop being so fucking impressive for like, two minutes?!

It is thoroughly emasculating!
User avatar #63 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
Pff. As if one needs additional reasons for such a thing.

I shall bring you the head of their queen, and raise her child as my own.
#46 - Interesting fact - men have evolved to suppress testosterone w…  [+] (1 new reply) 04/25/2014 on salami +2
#74 - broswagonist (04/25/2014) [-]
For some reason this gave me a fit of laughter. Thanks.
#22 - That gif looks like my gran when she tries to moonwalk, right …  [+] (3 new replies) 04/25/2014 on must be love +19
User avatar #26 - foxxywithpaws (04/25/2014) [-]
I'm sorry your granny's a penguin, man.
#27 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
It's cool
#29 - foxxywithpaws (04/25/2014) [-]
OHOHO, is funny because penguins live in the cooold!
#32 - Picture 04/25/2014 on salami +1
#7 - But why is he shopping in his underwear and slippers?  [+] (9 new replies) 04/25/2014 on Gladiator Pigs +1
User avatar #24 - tiredofthis (04/26/2014) [-]
Have you not been to a wallmart recently?
#20 - pootismang (04/25/2014) [-]
User avatar #10 - pvtgoblin (04/25/2014) [-]
Because he wants to be like The Dude
User avatar #16 - robogroovy (04/25/2014) [-]
what dude?
User avatar #19 - pvtgoblin (04/25/2014) [-]
THE Dude.
From the Big Lebowski
#29 - Faded (04/26/2014) [-]
The dude abides.
User avatar #8 - lolollo (04/25/2014) [-]
Because he's a man.
#11 - rohedje (04/25/2014) [-]
He is all i want to be. Just imagine: standing tall and proud, wearing only trousers and slippers, with beard that never felt touch of razor, drunk and absolutely shameless in the middle of shopping mall...
Ahh, that was a good summer...
#12 - lolollo (04/25/2014) [-]
Every man's great challenge is having the largest boxer radius compared to any other man in his town...

An tha man would be winning...
#17 - I forgot to mention earlier - at the bottom, it mentions the l…  [+] (1 new reply) 04/25/2014 on Backfire 0
User avatar #18 - nonouch (04/25/2014) [-]
should haved looked thet up earlier, makes sense now
#35 - Geneticist here, feel like I need to jump in. Telomeres are ca…  [+] (16 new replies) 04/25/2014 on 5 Seconds Without Oxygen +1
#201 - Womens Study Major (04/26/2014) [-]
lol a 20 year old geneticist. watch out everyone, dougie houser is on funnyjunk
User avatar #61 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
whoops, that's what I meant to say.
This is what happens when you write things too quickly.

I have brought shame upon my ancestors, and my genetics teacher.
User avatar #62 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
You must atone for your mistake. It is not too late to regain your honour! Hunt down and kill an anti-vaccer, and all will be forgiven
User avatar #65 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
but first I'll just ... finish writing my neuroscience thesis that totally wasn't supposed to be in as a mostly final draft ten hours ago.
User avatar #66 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
You should probably get on that. It sounds important
User avatar #68 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
you would think that, and you would be correct.

but hey, at least I mostly finished turning my friend's physics thesis in complex network formation into a viable theoretical model for population distributions of threatened frog species, which is currently able to predict the impact of population sinks (areas attractive to a species for breeding/ settling that ultimately result in death), using real-world data for 10000 meter survey sites in NY state.

... so there's that. Might be a bit late with thesis, but if I can refine this model, I could also get another publication in before I take a year off / head to grad school.
User avatar #69 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
That's actually pretty impressive.
User avatar #72 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
I suppose.

It's just a bit of object oriented modeling, really. Once you understand the purpose of the link dependent growth algorithms used in the physics-y part to generate social networks, it's just a matter of setting boundaries based on viable spawning areas, planting a founder population, and adding in behavioral modifications for the population based on the real frogs.

I mean, what's the point of having all of this nifty knowledge if I can't use it for world domination cool science stuff?
User avatar #73 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
Actually applying knowledge is why I'm wanting to go into synthetic biology after I graduate. It appeals to me more than research
User avatar #74 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
Well, that will be an awesome career path. Synthetic biology is pretty much always exciting.

Personally, I just want to end up teaching at an R1 institution, where I can teach a few classes, and have my own lab in which to do behavioral neuroscience. Encephalopods, how do they think?! seriously though. The giant octopus eats its dead mother as a first meal, has a 2-5 year lifespan, and is mostly solitary, yet those crafty motherfuckers seek out interaction with handlers, remember and behave different according to the individual, are capable of learning commands, and adapt surprisingly well to life in captivity,even with other octopi. And all this with an abysmal encephalization quotient, and a cortex largely devoted to visual processing.
User avatar #75 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
That definitely sounds interesting. You might end up discovering the secret behind intelligence!
User avatar #79 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
Well, obviously it's magic.

Or an emergent effect of neural plasticity and whatever mechanisms underlie behavioral flexibility and social cognition. That could work too, among other things.
User avatar #83 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
Could they act differently for different people due to their visual processing? They see people they recognise, so they act a certain way.
User avatar #90 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
to a certain extent, yes. They have amazing visual acuity.

But, there was a study in which different handlers would either always feed, or always antagonize specific octopi. Not only did each octopus change their color and patterning in response to a recognized handler, but they would actively avoid the ones that antagonized them, and approach the ones that fed and played with them. That, and the handlers weren't required to wear the same thing every day, so it's assumed that they remember their faces and other such complex details.
They also have subtle patterning differences corresponding to individual trainers; so its clear that they recognize and behave according to the individual they're dealing with. They do the same thing with other members of their own species.
User avatar #135 - snowshark (04/26/2014) [-]
Would both you and Martycamp stop being so fucking impressive for like, two minutes?!

It is thoroughly emasculating!
User avatar #63 - coronus (04/25/2014) [-]
Pff. As if one needs additional reasons for such a thing.

I shall bring you the head of their queen, and raise her child as my own.
#27 - WHAT?! BOTH MY GRAN'S ARE NECROPHILIACS? **** … 04/25/2014 on I Really Enjoy Fuckscapes 0
#11 - Yes, anon, because all people of the same sex are the same. Al…  [+] (5 new replies) 04/25/2014 on salami +20
User avatar #84 - collateraldamageco (04/25/2014) [-]
what the anon said was retarded, but your response makes you look like a huge faggot
#113 - brujeriasun (04/26/2014) [-]
He was calling the anon a possible neckbeard for his retarded ass comment.
User avatar #130 - collateraldamageco (04/27/2014) [-]
I got that, the way he says it though
#30 - spinaltap (04/25/2014) [-]
You. I like you
#32 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
#13 - I'm not a physicist nor an engineer, but here goes: 1…  [+] (1 new reply) 04/25/2014 on Soviet russia +26
#23 - pootismang (04/25/2014) [-]
Main pilot on left, sidekick pilot that was gonna be riding bitch on right, they pull some Pacific Rim shit to fly it.
#12 - When his mode of attack wasn't working, he was stumped about w…  [+] (3 new replies) 04/25/2014 on legless fight +70
User avatar #40 - hellomynameisbill (04/26/2014) [-]
He'd sure be short of ideas if that happened
User avatar #35 - epicpoop (04/26/2014) [-]
in4 faster version
#34 - organicglory (04/26/2014) [-]
That fight was pretty lame
#8 - We all derp sometimes  [+] (2 new replies) 04/25/2014 on Backfire +1
User avatar #12 - crazyolitis (04/25/2014) [-]
That gif looks like it's from 8 years ago. No idea why it feels like that.
#9 - areandara (04/25/2014) [-]
some more often than others
#6 - The car driver is shouting out to random people that he's hear…  [+] (11 new replies) 04/25/2014 on Backfire +47
User avatar #16 - nonouch (04/25/2014) [-]
still don't get it...
where's the funny/clever part?
#19 - iamstoopid (04/25/2014) [-]
the funny/clever part is the last guy actually did kill someone after joking about it with the other ones
User avatar #20 - nonouch (04/25/2014) [-]
you need to know about that law of averages to be funny, which i do now. I do know how to read though
User avatar #17 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
I forgot to mention earlier - at the bottom, it mentions the law of averages. It's saying that eventually, you'll find someone who actually did kill someone.
User avatar #18 - nonouch (04/25/2014) [-]
should haved looked thet up earlier, makes sense now
User avatar #10 - respectyourmom (04/25/2014) [-]
i cannot believe you had to explain that...
User avatar #11 - sackit (04/25/2014) [-]
Well itought it was a reffrence not just a random joke.. so i did not get it ether but i got it but i did not, but i still did.
User avatar #7 - areandara (04/25/2014) [-]
I'm stupid. thanks.
#8 - martycamp (04/25/2014) [-]
We all derp sometimes
User avatar #12 - crazyolitis (04/25/2014) [-]
That gif looks like it's from 8 years ago. No idea why it feels like that.
#9 - areandara (04/25/2014) [-]
some more often than others
#61 - But by being in that anime, doesn't that make her the main cha…  [+] (5 new replies) 04/25/2014 on I would watch this so hard +31
User avatar #95 - shinku (04/25/2014) [-]
that is kind of the point
User avatar #80 - applesdontpee (04/25/2014) [-]
dramatic irony?
User avatar #81 - applesdontpee (04/25/2014) [-]
or just plain irony..
#82 - satansferret (04/25/2014) [-]
You're somewhat rusty
User avatar #64 - oneupforme (04/25/2014) [-]
That would be the big revealing twist at the end when she realizes that to be the truth.
#254 - Me and my girlfriend at my uncle's wedding in January 04/24/2014 on Cutest Couple Contest -1
#4 - Picture 04/24/2014 on And so the cycle continues +1
#2 - Picture  [+] (2 new replies) 04/24/2014 on And so the cycle continues +2
#3 - shagtastic (04/24/2014) [-]
That gave me a good chuckle, thank you.
#4 - martycamp (04/24/2014) [-]
#48 - It's clearly the Canadian Bair Force 04/24/2014 on Rare picture of Canadian... +1
#1 - This gif is udderly ridiculous 04/22/2014 on When Cows Attack 0
#30 - Comment deleted 04/22/2014 on Comment w/the most likes... 0
#2 - When I was young, I had to share my dad's old one of these wit… 04/22/2014 on happy 25th birthday gameboy 0
#11 - Cool. But I didn't get it from here 04/22/2014 on So Cute 0
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User avatar #62 - martycamp (06/12/2014) [-]
**martycamp rolls 809**
User avatar #61 - martycamp (06/12/2014) [-]
**martycamp rolls 362**
User avatar #60 - martycamp (06/11/2014) [-]
**martycamp rolls 748**
User avatar #59 - martycamp (06/11/2014) [-]
**martycamp rolls 042**
User avatar #58 - martycamp (06/11/2014) [-]
**martycamp rolls 376**
User avatar #57 - martycamp (06/11/2014) [-]
**martycamp rolls 186**
User avatar #56 - martycamp (06/11/2014) [-]
**martycamp rolls 589**
User avatar #55 - martycamp (06/11/2014) [-]
**martycamp rolls 930**
User avatar #54 - martycamp (12/09/2013) [-]
congrats man.
User avatar #53 - martycamp (08/30/2013) [-]
test
User avatar #52 - martycamp (08/27/2013) [-]
**martycamp rolls 14**
User avatar #51 - martycamp (08/23/2013) [-]
**martycamp rolls 081**
User avatar #50 - martycamp (08/18/2013) [-]
**martycamp rolls 50**
#48 - thechosentroll (07/25/2013) [-]
This image has expired
Good day. Have you accepted Slaanesh as your lord and drug dealer yet?
User avatar #49 to #48 - martycamp (07/26/2013) [-]
Uh, you know, I meant to, and then I just got really busy...
User avatar #17 - twi (06/16/2013) [-]
<3
User avatar #10 - owmowmow (06/12/2013) [-]
Friending for results... post link plz.
User avatar #14 to #12 - owmowmow (06/12/2013) [-]
Its gonna 404 sheeeiiiit.
User avatar #15 to #14 - martycamp (06/12/2013) [-]
oh well
User avatar #16 to #15 - owmowmow (06/12/2013) [-]
good times, lol
#13 to #12 - owmowmow (06/12/2013) [-]
Daym, Thought it would have gone two ways.   
   
My finger when.
Daym, Thought it would have gone two ways.

My finger when.
User avatar #9 - martycamp (03/08/2013) [-]
**martycamp rolls 2**
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