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italianfrosttroll

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Gender: male
Date Signed Up:11/16/2011
Last Login:12/05/2016
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latest user's comments

#4 - Kelowna faggots are top faggots. My old roommate was one,…  [+] (1 reply) 10/13/2016 on Fuck me Admin 0
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#5 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
God not good*
#110 - What you're thinking if is a snapping kick. A front kick, is i…  [+] (11 replies) 10/13/2016 on Can I axe kick your desk? 0
User avatar
#111 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
A front kick and axe kick has never been the same - front kick is a forward going kick with the ball of the foot, like driving a spear through a guy
Axe kick is a downwards kick, like chopping with an axe

It's true though that terminology is different from place to place, but I've never heard of axe kicks being called front kicks, and frankly I find it absolutely retarded - it makes no sense to call them front kick, terminology still has to make sense
User avatar
#112 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Axe kick goes straight forward, for Max momentum you keep your knee straight. In no martial art have I heard it called anything but a front kick. All my sensei's have been Hispanic or Asian in descent, which might have affected the language they use, but that's how I've come to know it. It does make sense though, because if you execute the same kick with sideways momentum, then it without question turns into a "crescent(snapping or straight leg)/ crossing/roundhouse" kick. Indoor or outdoor.
User avatar
#113 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
But it doesn't go forward, it goes downwards
User avatar
#114 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Which way do you go before you go down? If you aren't moving forward on a kick(unless you move back in a snap kick to gain range) then you're a dummie. Standing still during any movement is stupid.
User avatar
#115 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
You kick upward, and move the leg in a downwards arch, you might step forward to get to the right distance - but I doubt a downwards motion gains much power from the step...

So it's downwards kick
User avatar
#116 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
It gets power from keeping a straight leg, and gains range from the steps. Do you even martial arts bro?
User avatar
#117 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
That is exactly what I said, you step forward to gain distance, not to kick foward or to add power - it's an axe kick, not a front kick. I honestly doubt that you do martial arts at all
Google front kick, and you will literally never see an axe kick be referred to as front kick - you are absolutely, demonstrably wrong in calling an axe kick a front kick.

I seriously doubt that you do martial arts
User avatar
#119 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Well, for shots and gig's, I just went on a Google rampage, and you're right, 95% of sites call it am axe kick, and refer to a snap kick as a front kick. However I train with multiple black, through 5th degree black belts, as well as know and have trained with a few grand masters here in the US, and they have all called it a front kick, so a front kick I will continue to call it. I started judo at 7, boxing at 14, TKD and Karate, at 18, so you say what you will, but I ain't gona doubt in the ways I've learned.
User avatar
#120 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
The name isn't really the important part as long as it works, the only issue is that using the wrong terms create misunderstandings when talking about stuff.
It's fine that you trust what you've been taught, but refusing to question things and learn beyond that will just keep you back and stunt your growth

Which karate ryu do you practice?
User avatar
#121 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Learning beyond it doesn't mean you don't stick to your own terminology. For example, in TKD I learned crossing kicks, indoor and outdoor, but they were only straight leg. In karate (shoryin-ryu), we learn it as a crescent kick, with both straight, and snapping leg, but I'll always call it a crossing kick. I'm cool with learning techniques, but I keep the terminology how i like it.
User avatar
#122 - zaywoot (10/14/2016) [-]
The first karate ryu I practiced was goju ryu (specifically jundokan) - I later switched to a different goju ryu dojo and federation (IOGKF) because the training there was more inline with what I was seeking - I then had to stop for ~two years because of university - where I did some muay thai and some HEMA (which I still practice), but I fairly recently began at an ashihara dojo.
I felt the training at the first dojo was lacking practicality - it wasn't bad, it just needed that extra bit - the second goju dojo was better in that regard, and the bunkai (or whatever you call kata partner drills) were different and made much more sense.

Ashihara however beats the both by miles, it's all about practicality, the kata are developed around proper fighting, they are essentially shadowboxing - and is IMO much closer to real karate than what people claim traditional is.

Plus, at my dojo, we include boxing excercises, so we don't forget to punch to the face (since it's a full contact style) and have grappling included, the instructors have been to courses with people like Frank Shamrock and more.

Besides karate, I've practiced jujutsu, and bujinkan for a little while - as well as the muay thai and fencing like I mentioned above
#105 - I've seen 5th degree black belts use an extended leg axe kick …  [+] (2 replies) 10/13/2016 on Can I axe kick your desk? 0
User avatar
#108 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
That there sounds an awful lot like a certain copypasta
User avatar
#109 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
My life is pasta.
#103 - Axe kick is a layman's term. It's a front kick, albeit a poorl…  [+] (13 replies) 10/13/2016 on Can I axe kick your desk? 0
User avatar
#107 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
No it is by no means a front kick, a front kick is meant to go straight forward - an axe kick is supposed to come downwards
User avatar
#110 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
What you're thinking if is a snapping kick. A front kick, is indeed an axe kick, axe kick is just the common term. A front kick is bringing your hind leg straight up in front of you, fully extended, and bringing it down still extended. You keep your leg extended the whole way for maximum momentum. It's meant to finish a disoriented, or downed opponent. Then again, we're arguing tomato to toemahto, because most schools have different terms for the same stuff. Unless we're taking about ATF, because they're shit.
User avatar
#111 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
A front kick and axe kick has never been the same - front kick is a forward going kick with the ball of the foot, like driving a spear through a guy
Axe kick is a downwards kick, like chopping with an axe

It's true though that terminology is different from place to place, but I've never heard of axe kicks being called front kicks, and frankly I find it absolutely retarded - it makes no sense to call them front kick, terminology still has to make sense
User avatar
#112 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Axe kick goes straight forward, for Max momentum you keep your knee straight. In no martial art have I heard it called anything but a front kick. All my sensei's have been Hispanic or Asian in descent, which might have affected the language they use, but that's how I've come to know it. It does make sense though, because if you execute the same kick with sideways momentum, then it without question turns into a "crescent(snapping or straight leg)/ crossing/roundhouse" kick. Indoor or outdoor.
User avatar
#113 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
But it doesn't go forward, it goes downwards
User avatar
#114 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Which way do you go before you go down? If you aren't moving forward on a kick(unless you move back in a snap kick to gain range) then you're a dummie. Standing still during any movement is stupid.
User avatar
#115 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
You kick upward, and move the leg in a downwards arch, you might step forward to get to the right distance - but I doubt a downwards motion gains much power from the step...

So it's downwards kick
User avatar
#116 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
It gets power from keeping a straight leg, and gains range from the steps. Do you even martial arts bro?
User avatar
#117 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
That is exactly what I said, you step forward to gain distance, not to kick foward or to add power - it's an axe kick, not a front kick. I honestly doubt that you do martial arts at all
Google front kick, and you will literally never see an axe kick be referred to as front kick - you are absolutely, demonstrably wrong in calling an axe kick a front kick.

I seriously doubt that you do martial arts
User avatar
#119 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Well, for shots and gig's, I just went on a Google rampage, and you're right, 95% of sites call it am axe kick, and refer to a snap kick as a front kick. However I train with multiple black, through 5th degree black belts, as well as know and have trained with a few grand masters here in the US, and they have all called it a front kick, so a front kick I will continue to call it. I started judo at 7, boxing at 14, TKD and Karate, at 18, so you say what you will, but I ain't gona doubt in the ways I've learned.
User avatar
#120 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
The name isn't really the important part as long as it works, the only issue is that using the wrong terms create misunderstandings when talking about stuff.
It's fine that you trust what you've been taught, but refusing to question things and learn beyond that will just keep you back and stunt your growth

Which karate ryu do you practice?
User avatar
#121 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Learning beyond it doesn't mean you don't stick to your own terminology. For example, in TKD I learned crossing kicks, indoor and outdoor, but they were only straight leg. In karate (shoryin-ryu), we learn it as a crescent kick, with both straight, and snapping leg, but I'll always call it a crossing kick. I'm cool with learning techniques, but I keep the terminology how i like it.
User avatar
#122 - zaywoot (10/14/2016) [-]
The first karate ryu I practiced was goju ryu (specifically jundokan) - I later switched to a different goju ryu dojo and federation (IOGKF) because the training there was more inline with what I was seeking - I then had to stop for ~two years because of university - where I did some muay thai and some HEMA (which I still practice), but I fairly recently began at an ashihara dojo.
I felt the training at the first dojo was lacking practicality - it wasn't bad, it just needed that extra bit - the second goju dojo was better in that regard, and the bunkai (or whatever you call kata partner drills) were different and made much more sense.

Ashihara however beats the both by miles, it's all about practicality, the kata are developed around proper fighting, they are essentially shadowboxing - and is IMO much closer to real karate than what people claim traditional is.

Plus, at my dojo, we include boxing excercises, so we don't forget to punch to the face (since it's a full contact style) and have grappling included, the instructors have been to courses with people like Frank Shamrock and more.

Besides karate, I've practiced jujutsu, and bujinkan for a little while - as well as the muay thai and fencing like I mentioned above
#102 - I mean, I do taekwondo, and karate. I've been taught it as a f…  [+] (4 replies) 10/13/2016 on Can I axe kick your desk? 0
User avatar
#104 - the fuzzball (10/13/2016) [-]
3rd dan in TKD and an instructor at my school. keeping the leg straight is a beginners axe kick and what we usually teach to children. bending the knee to get the leg up is a lot easier to hit something with when in close, you need a lot of room when keeping the knee straight. bending the knee is what we call "sparring" axe kick or the actual functional axe kick.
User avatar
#105 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
I've seen 5th degree black belts use an extended leg axe kick effectively. It's not meant to be used up close and standing, it's a finisher. You use it from mid range when you've already disoriented an opponent, or have it on the floor. However, I will give that I don't learn any martial art for ring fighting, my school is a close group of air force special ops, marines, army, navy operators, and a few national guard guys that rarely show up. We are taught by an ex air force intelligence guy who studied one generation away from Jhoon Goo Rhee, and only learn combat application. We do however go to demos, and often are very disappointed by competition tkd teams, except the ones straight outa lesser Korea. Those yellow niggas be cray.
User avatar
#108 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
That there sounds an awful lot like a certain copypasta
User avatar
#109 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
My life is pasta.
#51 - Not really doe, one wants to keep his leg straight during a fr…  [+] (21 replies) 10/13/2016 on Can I axe kick your desk? 0
User avatar
#70 - the fuzzball (10/13/2016) [-]
what you're talking about is a stretch kick
User avatar
#102 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
I mean, I do taekwondo, and karate. I've been taught it as a front kick.
User avatar
#104 - the fuzzball (10/13/2016) [-]
3rd dan in TKD and an instructor at my school. keeping the leg straight is a beginners axe kick and what we usually teach to children. bending the knee to get the leg up is a lot easier to hit something with when in close, you need a lot of room when keeping the knee straight. bending the knee is what we call "sparring" axe kick or the actual functional axe kick.
User avatar
#105 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
I've seen 5th degree black belts use an extended leg axe kick effectively. It's not meant to be used up close and standing, it's a finisher. You use it from mid range when you've already disoriented an opponent, or have it on the floor. However, I will give that I don't learn any martial art for ring fighting, my school is a close group of air force special ops, marines, army, navy operators, and a few national guard guys that rarely show up. We are taught by an ex air force intelligence guy who studied one generation away from Jhoon Goo Rhee, and only learn combat application. We do however go to demos, and often are very disappointed by competition tkd teams, except the ones straight outa lesser Korea. Those yellow niggas be cray.
User avatar
#108 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
That there sounds an awful lot like a certain copypasta
User avatar
#109 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
My life is pasta.
User avatar
#59 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
It's an axe kick though, you kick upwards, extent the knee, and bring the leg down
User avatar
#103 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Axe kick is a layman's term. It's a front kick, albeit a poorly executed one.
User avatar
#107 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
No it is by no means a front kick, a front kick is meant to go straight forward - an axe kick is supposed to come downwards
User avatar
#110 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
What you're thinking if is a snapping kick. A front kick, is indeed an axe kick, axe kick is just the common term. A front kick is bringing your hind leg straight up in front of you, fully extended, and bringing it down still extended. You keep your leg extended the whole way for maximum momentum. It's meant to finish a disoriented, or downed opponent. Then again, we're arguing tomato to toemahto, because most schools have different terms for the same stuff. Unless we're taking about ATF, because they're shit.
User avatar
#111 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
A front kick and axe kick has never been the same - front kick is a forward going kick with the ball of the foot, like driving a spear through a guy
Axe kick is a downwards kick, like chopping with an axe

It's true though that terminology is different from place to place, but I've never heard of axe kicks being called front kicks, and frankly I find it absolutely retarded - it makes no sense to call them front kick, terminology still has to make sense
User avatar
#112 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Axe kick goes straight forward, for Max momentum you keep your knee straight. In no martial art have I heard it called anything but a front kick. All my sensei's have been Hispanic or Asian in descent, which might have affected the language they use, but that's how I've come to know it. It does make sense though, because if you execute the same kick with sideways momentum, then it without question turns into a "crescent(snapping or straight leg)/ crossing/roundhouse" kick. Indoor or outdoor.
User avatar
#113 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
But it doesn't go forward, it goes downwards
User avatar
#114 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Which way do you go before you go down? If you aren't moving forward on a kick(unless you move back in a snap kick to gain range) then you're a dummie. Standing still during any movement is stupid.
User avatar
#115 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
You kick upward, and move the leg in a downwards arch, you might step forward to get to the right distance - but I doubt a downwards motion gains much power from the step...

So it's downwards kick
User avatar
#116 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
It gets power from keeping a straight leg, and gains range from the steps. Do you even martial arts bro?
User avatar
#117 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
That is exactly what I said, you step forward to gain distance, not to kick foward or to add power - it's an axe kick, not a front kick. I honestly doubt that you do martial arts at all
Google front kick, and you will literally never see an axe kick be referred to as front kick - you are absolutely, demonstrably wrong in calling an axe kick a front kick.

I seriously doubt that you do martial arts
User avatar
#119 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Well, for shots and gig's, I just went on a Google rampage, and you're right, 95% of sites call it am axe kick, and refer to a snap kick as a front kick. However I train with multiple black, through 5th degree black belts, as well as know and have trained with a few grand masters here in the US, and they have all called it a front kick, so a front kick I will continue to call it. I started judo at 7, boxing at 14, TKD and Karate, at 18, so you say what you will, but I ain't gona doubt in the ways I've learned.
User avatar
#120 - zaywoot (10/13/2016) [-]
The name isn't really the important part as long as it works, the only issue is that using the wrong terms create misunderstandings when talking about stuff.
It's fine that you trust what you've been taught, but refusing to question things and learn beyond that will just keep you back and stunt your growth

Which karate ryu do you practice?
User avatar
#121 - italianfrosttroll (10/13/2016) [-]
Learning beyond it doesn't mean you don't stick to your own terminology. For example, in TKD I learned crossing kicks, indoor and outdoor, but they were only straight leg. In karate (shoryin-ryu), we learn it as a crescent kick, with both straight, and snapping leg, but I'll always call it a crossing kick. I'm cool with learning techniques, but I keep the terminology how i like it.
User avatar
#122 - zaywoot (10/14/2016) [-]
The first karate ryu I practiced was goju ryu (specifically jundokan) - I later switched to a different goju ryu dojo and federation (IOGKF) because the training there was more inline with what I was seeking - I then had to stop for ~two years because of university - where I did some muay thai and some HEMA (which I still practice), but I fairly recently began at an ashihara dojo.
I felt the training at the first dojo was lacking practicality - it wasn't bad, it just needed that extra bit - the second goju dojo was better in that regard, and the bunkai (or whatever you call kata partner drills) were different and made much more sense.

Ashihara however beats the both by miles, it's all about practicality, the kata are developed around proper fighting, they are essentially shadowboxing - and is IMO much closer to real karate than what people claim traditional is.

Plus, at my dojo, we include boxing excercises, so we don't forget to punch to the face (since it's a full contact style) and have grappling included, the instructors have been to courses with people like Frank Shamrock and more.

Besides karate, I've practiced jujutsu, and bujinkan for a little while - as well as the muay thai and fencing like I mentioned above
#400 - **italianfrosttroll used "*roll picture*"** **italianfrostt…  [+] (2 replies) 10/13/2016 on Roll for THICC qt 3.14 waifu 0
#504 - anon (10/13/2016) [-]
**anonymous rolled user kittygerman **
#505 - kittygerman (10/13/2016) [-]
I'm telling everyone