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hammarhead

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hammarhead Avatar Level 237 Comments: Ambassador Of Lulz
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Date Signed Up:11/12/2012
Last Login:12/20/2014
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Highest Content Rank:#3099
Highest Comment Rank:#1920
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latest user's comments

#339 - The second of the two! Honestly, powdered potassium nitrate ma…  [+] (4 new replies) 12/08/2014 on Man made leaf 0
User avatar #342 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
I buy ice/cold packs and use ammonium nitrate from those, and a brand of high-potassium salt, because it's got a high potassium chloride concentration. Dissolve the ammonium nitrate, strain it, boil the potassium chloride inside of it and then freeze it. It only leaves ammonium chloride waste, and when it's done, you can break down the formed crystals into a lovely flash powder. It's better than buying it online, but the problem is the salt can be hard to get in stores.
User avatar #343 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
interesting. Thank you.
User avatar #340 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
You know what they say? The better the oxidiser, the better the flash powder. I might try some of that tomorrow if I can. Do you buy yours or make it yourself? I'm in the mood for some chemistry atm, and I love flash powder so much.
User avatar #341 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I actually don't make flash powder! I'd love a recipe if you have it. I use KNO3 for the fuel, and it also makes for one third of gunpowder if you can get your hands on sulfur.
#337 - Amen to that, my friend. Biochemistry major here myself. I've …  [+] (6 new replies) 12/08/2014 on Man made leaf 0
User avatar #338 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
That depends. Do you mean rocket candy as in the little sweet discs, or the much cooler sugar-based rocket fuel?
User avatar #339 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
The second of the two! Honestly, powdered potassium nitrate makes such an excellent oxidizer. There are all sorts of recipes to be used with it, to make all sorts of fun things. I'd gladly share!
User avatar #342 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
I buy ice/cold packs and use ammonium nitrate from those, and a brand of high-potassium salt, because it's got a high potassium chloride concentration. Dissolve the ammonium nitrate, strain it, boil the potassium chloride inside of it and then freeze it. It only leaves ammonium chloride waste, and when it's done, you can break down the formed crystals into a lovely flash powder. It's better than buying it online, but the problem is the salt can be hard to get in stores.
User avatar #343 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
interesting. Thank you.
User avatar #340 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
You know what they say? The better the oxidiser, the better the flash powder. I might try some of that tomorrow if I can. Do you buy yours or make it yourself? I'm in the mood for some chemistry atm, and I love flash powder so much.
User avatar #341 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I actually don't make flash powder! I'd love a recipe if you have it. I use KNO3 for the fuel, and it also makes for one third of gunpowder if you can get your hands on sulfur.
#81 - I'll take this. That one was clever. 12/08/2014 on Critical +1
#74 - That's beautiful! Fukkin saved. 12/08/2014 on Tumblr 0
#335 - Did you know that there are a few species of protists that hav…  [+] (8 new replies) 12/08/2014 on Man made leaf 0
User avatar #336 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Biology never was my strong subject. I was always a chemistry man myself. I enjoyed playing with sulfur hexafluoride and ammonium chromate, and burning ionised transition metals. But still, I do have an interest in some parts of biology, but microbiology never really suited me as much as some of the other fields of biology. I enjoyed anatomy and the human body, and dissecting hearts as a kid. Bacteria and amoeba never really took my fancy. It took cool stuff to keep me interested, and sitting there testing for starch in a plant leaf was nothing like decomposing carbonates thermally.
User avatar #337 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Amen to that, my friend. Biochemistry major here myself. I've currently got a little cooking i've been doing, do you know what rocket candy is?
User avatar #338 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
That depends. Do you mean rocket candy as in the little sweet discs, or the much cooler sugar-based rocket fuel?
User avatar #339 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
The second of the two! Honestly, powdered potassium nitrate makes such an excellent oxidizer. There are all sorts of recipes to be used with it, to make all sorts of fun things. I'd gladly share!
User avatar #342 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
I buy ice/cold packs and use ammonium nitrate from those, and a brand of high-potassium salt, because it's got a high potassium chloride concentration. Dissolve the ammonium nitrate, strain it, boil the potassium chloride inside of it and then freeze it. It only leaves ammonium chloride waste, and when it's done, you can break down the formed crystals into a lovely flash powder. It's better than buying it online, but the problem is the salt can be hard to get in stores.
User avatar #343 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
interesting. Thank you.
User avatar #340 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
You know what they say? The better the oxidiser, the better the flash powder. I might try some of that tomorrow if I can. Do you buy yours or make it yourself? I'm in the mood for some chemistry atm, and I love flash powder so much.
User avatar #341 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I actually don't make flash powder! I'd love a recipe if you have it. I use KNO3 for the fuel, and it also makes for one third of gunpowder if you can get your hands on sulfur.
#333 - Alright, then let's get back to the original subject of conver…  [+] (10 new replies) 12/08/2014 on Man made leaf 0
User avatar #334 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Alrighty. What about them? We've covered the vacuum part, so what else?
User avatar #335 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Did you know that there are a few species of protists that have chloroplasts, but are also predatory? Dinoflagellates are an excellent example of this. They're very efficient creatures, and although it doesn't surprise me, it's unfortunate that there aren't many creatures like it, both auto and heterophagous. Are you at all interested in microbiology yourself?
User avatar #336 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Biology never was my strong subject. I was always a chemistry man myself. I enjoyed playing with sulfur hexafluoride and ammonium chromate, and burning ionised transition metals. But still, I do have an interest in some parts of biology, but microbiology never really suited me as much as some of the other fields of biology. I enjoyed anatomy and the human body, and dissecting hearts as a kid. Bacteria and amoeba never really took my fancy. It took cool stuff to keep me interested, and sitting there testing for starch in a plant leaf was nothing like decomposing carbonates thermally.
User avatar #337 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Amen to that, my friend. Biochemistry major here myself. I've currently got a little cooking i've been doing, do you know what rocket candy is?
User avatar #338 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
That depends. Do you mean rocket candy as in the little sweet discs, or the much cooler sugar-based rocket fuel?
User avatar #339 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
The second of the two! Honestly, powdered potassium nitrate makes such an excellent oxidizer. There are all sorts of recipes to be used with it, to make all sorts of fun things. I'd gladly share!
User avatar #342 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
I buy ice/cold packs and use ammonium nitrate from those, and a brand of high-potassium salt, because it's got a high potassium chloride concentration. Dissolve the ammonium nitrate, strain it, boil the potassium chloride inside of it and then freeze it. It only leaves ammonium chloride waste, and when it's done, you can break down the formed crystals into a lovely flash powder. It's better than buying it online, but the problem is the salt can be hard to get in stores.
User avatar #343 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
interesting. Thank you.
User avatar #340 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
You know what they say? The better the oxidiser, the better the flash powder. I might try some of that tomorrow if I can. Do you buy yours or make it yourself? I'm in the mood for some chemistry atm, and I love flash powder so much.
User avatar #341 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I actually don't make flash powder! I'd love a recipe if you have it. I use KNO3 for the fuel, and it also makes for one third of gunpowder if you can get your hands on sulfur.
#331 - I appreciate the apology, if that's what that was supposed to …  [+] (12 new replies) 12/08/2014 on Man made leaf 0
User avatar #332 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Seriously? No, that's not my intention. I didn't once say you were wrong (save for the "no one gives a shit about words" part, that's really wrong.) I'm just responding in an attempt to cover all the points you brought up in your comment so that they can all be resolved and you can be on your way. I'm not trying to start an argument, it's just the nature in which I've learned to respond to comments.
User avatar #333 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Alright, then let's get back to the original subject of conversation, shall we? Chloroplasts.
User avatar #334 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Alrighty. What about them? We've covered the vacuum part, so what else?
User avatar #335 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Did you know that there are a few species of protists that have chloroplasts, but are also predatory? Dinoflagellates are an excellent example of this. They're very efficient creatures, and although it doesn't surprise me, it's unfortunate that there aren't many creatures like it, both auto and heterophagous. Are you at all interested in microbiology yourself?
User avatar #336 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Biology never was my strong subject. I was always a chemistry man myself. I enjoyed playing with sulfur hexafluoride and ammonium chromate, and burning ionised transition metals. But still, I do have an interest in some parts of biology, but microbiology never really suited me as much as some of the other fields of biology. I enjoyed anatomy and the human body, and dissecting hearts as a kid. Bacteria and amoeba never really took my fancy. It took cool stuff to keep me interested, and sitting there testing for starch in a plant leaf was nothing like decomposing carbonates thermally.
User avatar #337 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Amen to that, my friend. Biochemistry major here myself. I've currently got a little cooking i've been doing, do you know what rocket candy is?
User avatar #338 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
That depends. Do you mean rocket candy as in the little sweet discs, or the much cooler sugar-based rocket fuel?
User avatar #339 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
The second of the two! Honestly, powdered potassium nitrate makes such an excellent oxidizer. There are all sorts of recipes to be used with it, to make all sorts of fun things. I'd gladly share!
User avatar #342 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
I buy ice/cold packs and use ammonium nitrate from those, and a brand of high-potassium salt, because it's got a high potassium chloride concentration. Dissolve the ammonium nitrate, strain it, boil the potassium chloride inside of it and then freeze it. It only leaves ammonium chloride waste, and when it's done, you can break down the formed crystals into a lovely flash powder. It's better than buying it online, but the problem is the salt can be hard to get in stores.
User avatar #343 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
interesting. Thank you.
User avatar #340 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
You know what they say? The better the oxidiser, the better the flash powder. I might try some of that tomorrow if I can. Do you buy yours or make it yourself? I'm in the mood for some chemistry atm, and I love flash powder so much.
User avatar #341 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I actually don't make flash powder! I'd love a recipe if you have it. I use KNO3 for the fuel, and it also makes for one third of gunpowder if you can get your hands on sulfur.
#329 - Listen. No one gives a **** about words. I think …  [+] (14 new replies) 12/08/2014 on Man made leaf -1
User avatar #330 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
>no-one gives a shit about words

I would love to see your academia work, then. Words are the most important part of presenting your knowledge. Choose the wrong words, it's not conveyed right. Sounds like you're just being angsty because you get too heated over someone from the Internet. Tone it down a bit, seriously. The "snarkiness" is all in your perception, it was not intended at all, but you can interpret as you like.
User avatar #331 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I appreciate the apology, if that's what that was supposed to be. So, are you just trying to change it to another argument because you don't wish to acknowledge the fact that i was correct? Serious question.
User avatar #332 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Seriously? No, that's not my intention. I didn't once say you were wrong (save for the "no one gives a shit about words" part, that's really wrong.) I'm just responding in an attempt to cover all the points you brought up in your comment so that they can all be resolved and you can be on your way. I'm not trying to start an argument, it's just the nature in which I've learned to respond to comments.
User avatar #333 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Alright, then let's get back to the original subject of conversation, shall we? Chloroplasts.
User avatar #334 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Alrighty. What about them? We've covered the vacuum part, so what else?
User avatar #335 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Did you know that there are a few species of protists that have chloroplasts, but are also predatory? Dinoflagellates are an excellent example of this. They're very efficient creatures, and although it doesn't surprise me, it's unfortunate that there aren't many creatures like it, both auto and heterophagous. Are you at all interested in microbiology yourself?
User avatar #336 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Biology never was my strong subject. I was always a chemistry man myself. I enjoyed playing with sulfur hexafluoride and ammonium chromate, and burning ionised transition metals. But still, I do have an interest in some parts of biology, but microbiology never really suited me as much as some of the other fields of biology. I enjoyed anatomy and the human body, and dissecting hearts as a kid. Bacteria and amoeba never really took my fancy. It took cool stuff to keep me interested, and sitting there testing for starch in a plant leaf was nothing like decomposing carbonates thermally.
User avatar #337 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Amen to that, my friend. Biochemistry major here myself. I've currently got a little cooking i've been doing, do you know what rocket candy is?
User avatar #338 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
That depends. Do you mean rocket candy as in the little sweet discs, or the much cooler sugar-based rocket fuel?
User avatar #339 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
The second of the two! Honestly, powdered potassium nitrate makes such an excellent oxidizer. There are all sorts of recipes to be used with it, to make all sorts of fun things. I'd gladly share!
User avatar #342 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
I buy ice/cold packs and use ammonium nitrate from those, and a brand of high-potassium salt, because it's got a high potassium chloride concentration. Dissolve the ammonium nitrate, strain it, boil the potassium chloride inside of it and then freeze it. It only leaves ammonium chloride waste, and when it's done, you can break down the formed crystals into a lovely flash powder. It's better than buying it online, but the problem is the salt can be hard to get in stores.
User avatar #343 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
interesting. Thank you.
User avatar #340 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
You know what they say? The better the oxidiser, the better the flash powder. I might try some of that tomorrow if I can. Do you buy yours or make it yourself? I'm in the mood for some chemistry atm, and I love flash powder so much.
User avatar #341 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I actually don't make flash powder! I'd love a recipe if you have it. I use KNO3 for the fuel, and it also makes for one third of gunpowder if you can get your hands on sulfur.
#327 - Alright, it's very different if we're talking about the inside…  [+] (16 new replies) 12/08/2014 on Man made leaf 0
User avatar #328 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Yes, I completely see what you're saying, but your choice of words was completely the wrong way to go about it. You need to use more appropriate words, so your meaning is clear or else you convey the wrong message. I did not question your intelligence, simply your knowledge of the subject to make sure you weren't confused or misunderstood in any aspect.
User avatar #329 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Listen. No one gives a shit about words. I think you're just arguing for the sake of arguing at this point. I think they call it trying to get the last word. You asked me to tell you how chloroplasts couldn't live in space in a snarky manner. I explained patiently and kindly. Unless you've got anything else to add on the subject, hostility like this is draining and I'd rather us come to a conclusion.
User avatar #330 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
>no-one gives a shit about words

I would love to see your academia work, then. Words are the most important part of presenting your knowledge. Choose the wrong words, it's not conveyed right. Sounds like you're just being angsty because you get too heated over someone from the Internet. Tone it down a bit, seriously. The "snarkiness" is all in your perception, it was not intended at all, but you can interpret as you like.
User avatar #331 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I appreciate the apology, if that's what that was supposed to be. So, are you just trying to change it to another argument because you don't wish to acknowledge the fact that i was correct? Serious question.
User avatar #332 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Seriously? No, that's not my intention. I didn't once say you were wrong (save for the "no one gives a shit about words" part, that's really wrong.) I'm just responding in an attempt to cover all the points you brought up in your comment so that they can all be resolved and you can be on your way. I'm not trying to start an argument, it's just the nature in which I've learned to respond to comments.
User avatar #333 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Alright, then let's get back to the original subject of conversation, shall we? Chloroplasts.
User avatar #334 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Alrighty. What about them? We've covered the vacuum part, so what else?
User avatar #335 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Did you know that there are a few species of protists that have chloroplasts, but are also predatory? Dinoflagellates are an excellent example of this. They're very efficient creatures, and although it doesn't surprise me, it's unfortunate that there aren't many creatures like it, both auto and heterophagous. Are you at all interested in microbiology yourself?
User avatar #336 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Biology never was my strong subject. I was always a chemistry man myself. I enjoyed playing with sulfur hexafluoride and ammonium chromate, and burning ionised transition metals. But still, I do have an interest in some parts of biology, but microbiology never really suited me as much as some of the other fields of biology. I enjoyed anatomy and the human body, and dissecting hearts as a kid. Bacteria and amoeba never really took my fancy. It took cool stuff to keep me interested, and sitting there testing for starch in a plant leaf was nothing like decomposing carbonates thermally.
User avatar #337 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Amen to that, my friend. Biochemistry major here myself. I've currently got a little cooking i've been doing, do you know what rocket candy is?
User avatar #338 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
That depends. Do you mean rocket candy as in the little sweet discs, or the much cooler sugar-based rocket fuel?
User avatar #339 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
The second of the two! Honestly, powdered potassium nitrate makes such an excellent oxidizer. There are all sorts of recipes to be used with it, to make all sorts of fun things. I'd gladly share!
User avatar #342 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
I buy ice/cold packs and use ammonium nitrate from those, and a brand of high-potassium salt, because it's got a high potassium chloride concentration. Dissolve the ammonium nitrate, strain it, boil the potassium chloride inside of it and then freeze it. It only leaves ammonium chloride waste, and when it's done, you can break down the formed crystals into a lovely flash powder. It's better than buying it online, but the problem is the salt can be hard to get in stores.
User avatar #343 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
interesting. Thank you.
User avatar #340 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
You know what they say? The better the oxidiser, the better the flash powder. I might try some of that tomorrow if I can. Do you buy yours or make it yourself? I'm in the mood for some chemistry atm, and I love flash powder so much.
User avatar #341 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I actually don't make flash powder! I'd love a recipe if you have it. I use KNO3 for the fuel, and it also makes for one third of gunpowder if you can get your hands on sulfur.
#1737 - That hurts, man. 12/08/2014 on we are all brothers on FJ +1
#55 - ******* love yo0ur gif man 12/08/2014 on Where's a kahjit when you... +1
#324 - Yeah, it's pretty simple. It's basic logic, really. vacuum = …  [+] (18 new replies) 12/08/2014 on Man made leaf 0
User avatar #326 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Are you sure you're talking about a vacuum that's devoid of matter? Because that "suction" idea is completely preventable in spacecraft with an artificial environment. Do you understand how the "suction" works within a vacuum?
User avatar #327 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Alright, it's very different if we're talking about the inside of a spaceship. The inside of a space ship is no a vacuum, but a controlled environment simulating earth. In that environment, yes it's completely feasible. In fact, just regular plants could be grown in the spacecraft. It's been done. But we on the other hand are talking about the vacuum of space, which is what you asked me to explain. There is no "suction", sucked was simply the verb I used to describe what would happen to any gasses, liquids, and even some solids on the surface of a chloroplast, as the total vacuum of space would completely vaporize them, and they would fly off in all different directions. The chloroplast would then be left with no gasses or water to sustain the cycle of photosynthesis (not to mention the lack of ATP it would need to undergo it), and it would likely end up as a little shriveled microscopic ball from the intense thermal energy loss that happens when liquid is so quickly evaporated off of something. That's why choloroplasts cannot survive in the vacuum of space. Do you see what I'm saying, or am I talking with a wall?
User avatar #328 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Yes, I completely see what you're saying, but your choice of words was completely the wrong way to go about it. You need to use more appropriate words, so your meaning is clear or else you convey the wrong message. I did not question your intelligence, simply your knowledge of the subject to make sure you weren't confused or misunderstood in any aspect.
User avatar #329 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Listen. No one gives a shit about words. I think you're just arguing for the sake of arguing at this point. I think they call it trying to get the last word. You asked me to tell you how chloroplasts couldn't live in space in a snarky manner. I explained patiently and kindly. Unless you've got anything else to add on the subject, hostility like this is draining and I'd rather us come to a conclusion.
User avatar #330 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
>no-one gives a shit about words

I would love to see your academia work, then. Words are the most important part of presenting your knowledge. Choose the wrong words, it's not conveyed right. Sounds like you're just being angsty because you get too heated over someone from the Internet. Tone it down a bit, seriously. The "snarkiness" is all in your perception, it was not intended at all, but you can interpret as you like.
User avatar #331 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I appreciate the apology, if that's what that was supposed to be. So, are you just trying to change it to another argument because you don't wish to acknowledge the fact that i was correct? Serious question.
User avatar #332 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Seriously? No, that's not my intention. I didn't once say you were wrong (save for the "no one gives a shit about words" part, that's really wrong.) I'm just responding in an attempt to cover all the points you brought up in your comment so that they can all be resolved and you can be on your way. I'm not trying to start an argument, it's just the nature in which I've learned to respond to comments.
User avatar #333 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Alright, then let's get back to the original subject of conversation, shall we? Chloroplasts.
User avatar #334 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Alrighty. What about them? We've covered the vacuum part, so what else?
User avatar #335 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Did you know that there are a few species of protists that have chloroplasts, but are also predatory? Dinoflagellates are an excellent example of this. They're very efficient creatures, and although it doesn't surprise me, it's unfortunate that there aren't many creatures like it, both auto and heterophagous. Are you at all interested in microbiology yourself?
User avatar #336 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Biology never was my strong subject. I was always a chemistry man myself. I enjoyed playing with sulfur hexafluoride and ammonium chromate, and burning ionised transition metals. But still, I do have an interest in some parts of biology, but microbiology never really suited me as much as some of the other fields of biology. I enjoyed anatomy and the human body, and dissecting hearts as a kid. Bacteria and amoeba never really took my fancy. It took cool stuff to keep me interested, and sitting there testing for starch in a plant leaf was nothing like decomposing carbonates thermally.
User avatar #337 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Amen to that, my friend. Biochemistry major here myself. I've currently got a little cooking i've been doing, do you know what rocket candy is?
User avatar #338 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
That depends. Do you mean rocket candy as in the little sweet discs, or the much cooler sugar-based rocket fuel?
User avatar #339 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
The second of the two! Honestly, powdered potassium nitrate makes such an excellent oxidizer. There are all sorts of recipes to be used with it, to make all sorts of fun things. I'd gladly share!
User avatar #342 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
I buy ice/cold packs and use ammonium nitrate from those, and a brand of high-potassium salt, because it's got a high potassium chloride concentration. Dissolve the ammonium nitrate, strain it, boil the potassium chloride inside of it and then freeze it. It only leaves ammonium chloride waste, and when it's done, you can break down the formed crystals into a lovely flash powder. It's better than buying it online, but the problem is the salt can be hard to get in stores.
User avatar #343 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
interesting. Thank you.
User avatar #340 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
You know what they say? The better the oxidiser, the better the flash powder. I might try some of that tomorrow if I can. Do you buy yours or make it yourself? I'm in the mood for some chemistry atm, and I love flash powder so much.
User avatar #341 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I actually don't make flash powder! I'd love a recipe if you have it. I use KNO3 for the fuel, and it also makes for one third of gunpowder if you can get your hands on sulfur.
#301 - Photons are how chloroplasts make oxygen from carbon dioxide… 12/07/2014 on Man made leaf 0
#299 - In a vacuum, chloroplasts don't survive either dude. Do you kn…  [+] (20 new replies) 12/07/2014 on Man made leaf 0
User avatar #323 - sciencexplain (12/07/2014) [-]
A chloroplast is the organelle of a plant that converts sunlight to sugar through the photoreceptor chlorophyll contained within the chloroplast.

Would you like to prove to me that chloroplast don't survive in a vacuum?
User avatar #324 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Yeah, it's pretty simple. It's basic logic, really. vacuum = no gasses of any kind. many liquids, including water are also sucked away in a vacuum. Without water, carbon dioxide, or any way for them to receive adenosinetriposphates, they'd be completely unable to undergo photosynthesis.
User avatar #326 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Are you sure you're talking about a vacuum that's devoid of matter? Because that "suction" idea is completely preventable in spacecraft with an artificial environment. Do you understand how the "suction" works within a vacuum?
User avatar #327 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Alright, it's very different if we're talking about the inside of a spaceship. The inside of a space ship is no a vacuum, but a controlled environment simulating earth. In that environment, yes it's completely feasible. In fact, just regular plants could be grown in the spacecraft. It's been done. But we on the other hand are talking about the vacuum of space, which is what you asked me to explain. There is no "suction", sucked was simply the verb I used to describe what would happen to any gasses, liquids, and even some solids on the surface of a chloroplast, as the total vacuum of space would completely vaporize them, and they would fly off in all different directions. The chloroplast would then be left with no gasses or water to sustain the cycle of photosynthesis (not to mention the lack of ATP it would need to undergo it), and it would likely end up as a little shriveled microscopic ball from the intense thermal energy loss that happens when liquid is so quickly evaporated off of something. That's why choloroplasts cannot survive in the vacuum of space. Do you see what I'm saying, or am I talking with a wall?
User avatar #328 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Yes, I completely see what you're saying, but your choice of words was completely the wrong way to go about it. You need to use more appropriate words, so your meaning is clear or else you convey the wrong message. I did not question your intelligence, simply your knowledge of the subject to make sure you weren't confused or misunderstood in any aspect.
User avatar #329 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Listen. No one gives a shit about words. I think you're just arguing for the sake of arguing at this point. I think they call it trying to get the last word. You asked me to tell you how chloroplasts couldn't live in space in a snarky manner. I explained patiently and kindly. Unless you've got anything else to add on the subject, hostility like this is draining and I'd rather us come to a conclusion.
User avatar #330 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
>no-one gives a shit about words

I would love to see your academia work, then. Words are the most important part of presenting your knowledge. Choose the wrong words, it's not conveyed right. Sounds like you're just being angsty because you get too heated over someone from the Internet. Tone it down a bit, seriously. The "snarkiness" is all in your perception, it was not intended at all, but you can interpret as you like.
User avatar #331 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I appreciate the apology, if that's what that was supposed to be. So, are you just trying to change it to another argument because you don't wish to acknowledge the fact that i was correct? Serious question.
User avatar #332 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Seriously? No, that's not my intention. I didn't once say you were wrong (save for the "no one gives a shit about words" part, that's really wrong.) I'm just responding in an attempt to cover all the points you brought up in your comment so that they can all be resolved and you can be on your way. I'm not trying to start an argument, it's just the nature in which I've learned to respond to comments.
User avatar #333 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Alright, then let's get back to the original subject of conversation, shall we? Chloroplasts.
User avatar #334 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Alrighty. What about them? We've covered the vacuum part, so what else?
User avatar #335 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Did you know that there are a few species of protists that have chloroplasts, but are also predatory? Dinoflagellates are an excellent example of this. They're very efficient creatures, and although it doesn't surprise me, it's unfortunate that there aren't many creatures like it, both auto and heterophagous. Are you at all interested in microbiology yourself?
User avatar #336 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
Biology never was my strong subject. I was always a chemistry man myself. I enjoyed playing with sulfur hexafluoride and ammonium chromate, and burning ionised transition metals. But still, I do have an interest in some parts of biology, but microbiology never really suited me as much as some of the other fields of biology. I enjoyed anatomy and the human body, and dissecting hearts as a kid. Bacteria and amoeba never really took my fancy. It took cool stuff to keep me interested, and sitting there testing for starch in a plant leaf was nothing like decomposing carbonates thermally.
User avatar #337 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
Amen to that, my friend. Biochemistry major here myself. I've currently got a little cooking i've been doing, do you know what rocket candy is?
User avatar #338 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
That depends. Do you mean rocket candy as in the little sweet discs, or the much cooler sugar-based rocket fuel?
User avatar #339 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
The second of the two! Honestly, powdered potassium nitrate makes such an excellent oxidizer. There are all sorts of recipes to be used with it, to make all sorts of fun things. I'd gladly share!
User avatar #342 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
I buy ice/cold packs and use ammonium nitrate from those, and a brand of high-potassium salt, because it's got a high potassium chloride concentration. Dissolve the ammonium nitrate, strain it, boil the potassium chloride inside of it and then freeze it. It only leaves ammonium chloride waste, and when it's done, you can break down the formed crystals into a lovely flash powder. It's better than buying it online, but the problem is the salt can be hard to get in stores.
User avatar #343 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
interesting. Thank you.
User avatar #340 - sciencexplain (12/08/2014) [-]
You know what they say? The better the oxidiser, the better the flash powder. I might try some of that tomorrow if I can. Do you buy yours or make it yourself? I'm in the mood for some chemistry atm, and I love flash powder so much.
User avatar #341 - hammarhead (12/08/2014) [-]
I actually don't make flash powder! I'd love a recipe if you have it. I use KNO3 for the fuel, and it also makes for one third of gunpowder if you can get your hands on sulfur.
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User avatar #8 - thewizsam (09/03/2014) [-]
why you thumb me down
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Where at? :C
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