Upload
Login or register

gtaant

Last status update:
-
Gender: male
Age: 27
Date Signed Up:1/04/2011
Last Login:12/07/2016
Stats
Comment Ranking:#11254
Highest Content Rank:#1908
Highest Comment Rank:#2144
Content Thumbs: 7456 total,  8063 ,  607
Comment Thumbs: 3752 total,  4312 ,  560
Content Level Progress: 43% (43/100)
Level 174 Content: Soldier Of Funnyjunk → Level 175 Content: Soldier Of Funnyjunk
Comment Level Progress: 31% (31/100)
Level 236 Comments: Ambassador Of Lulz → Level 237 Comments: Ambassador Of Lulz
Subscribers:16
Content Views:426597
Times Content Favorited:33 times
Total Comments Made:1226
FJ Points:11871
Favorite Tags: i (2) | it (2)

latest user's comments

#79 - Silly anon. 09/10/2013 on Hey Apple! +5
#245 - Did you just ask for us to stay on topic? You do real…  [+] (13 replies) 09/10/2013 on English 0
User avatar
#248 - blamie (09/10/2013) [-]
Yes, and so does Northern "English" a Scottish accent on your "English" Cockney "English" and the Gaelic accent on "English" in that one country your government keeps trying to say is really just more England. And that's just on your island and the one right next to it. And yes, I asked you to stay on topic because you instigated a discussion, and now that your points are being countered and your fallacies pointed out, you are trying to get me to go of about how it's french fries and cookies, and frankly, I don't care.
User avatar
#250 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
Scotland is a separate country.

Gaelic is a separate language, spoken in Wales. It is again, a separate country. The Welsh speak English in an accent, yes.

But the majority of words, though pronounced in different ways, are pronounced the same (or atleast very similarly) phonetically.

It is a fact, still, irrefutably, that time and separation has led to different pronunciations, spellings and uses of words in the US. Why does this bother you so much?
#283 - mymiddleleg Comment deleted by
#261 - tsukaza (09/10/2013) [-]
As a Welsh person I can confirm that Gaelic is not spoken in Wales and has never been a language of ours. Gaelic is Scottish or Irish.
Also, why would you say Scotland is a separate country but not any other country being brought up? :/
User avatar
#264 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
I don't even know why I said Welsh, that was just plain silly.

Welsh is the Welsh language, it's Welsh.

And because blamie mentioned a Scottish accent, but the Scots pronounce the majority of words identically to England and certainly spell them all the same. They also have Gaelic, but nobody other than Edie McCredie and chums on Balamory use it.
#265 - tsukaza (09/10/2013) [-]
I guess you haven't seen a true Scottish then. There's barely a shred of same when they speak.
Never mind the fact that most southern Englishmen can't even converse with most Scotsmen... Yes, they pronounce things that weirdly but *I* can understand them.
User avatar
#266 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
A true Scottish?

My Mum is Scottish.

I lived in Dundee for three years.

Tonight I will be in the pub with a Scottish friend, who is actually ginger.
#269 - tsukaza (09/10/2013) [-]
Many words at all like English people do.*
#267 - tsukaza (09/10/2013) [-]
Then you of all people should know that Scottish people (mostly because of the accent they are rocking) Don't pronounce many words at all to most English people.
If anything it's us Welsh people but even our sing song accent makes it different mostly.
User avatar
#270 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
Ha ha, "sing song accent" is the best description of the Welsh accent I've ever heard.
User avatar
#251 - blamie (09/10/2013) [-]
Because you are acting as if it matters, and as if there is no variation in "English" pronunciations in England, and there is a difference between "English" and "American English" when there is so much variation from place to place, which is retarded in the major degree when the language varied from person to person. We are speaking the same words to each other, with the same grammar and syntax, the same spelling, and the same sentence structure, English is English. Also another point to make is that you are trying to make yourself feel superior to Americans by diluting yourself into thinking that we are speaking different languages.
User avatar
#253 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
Yes, that's exactly what I'm saying.

I've made my points, phonetically the majority of words spoken in Britain are said the same, but in different accents. There are examples of US words which are pronounced entirely differently, examples of which are posted above, such as left-ten-ant to loo-ten-ant.

There are also words which are the same but have different meanings on either side of the point, as I pointed out.

We also have varying spellings and grammar conventions, which you have denied. For example, in the US words are "ized" whereas in the UK they are "ised", and in the US "er" is more common than the "re" used in the UK (e.g. liter/litre).

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_British_English_spelling_differences

www.onestopenglish.com/grammar/grammar-reference/american-english-vs-british-english/differences-in-american-and-british-english-grammar-article/152820.article

Time and distance has lead to two languages, American and British English.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_American_and_British_English
User avatar
#255 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
led* to two languages, sorry.
#243 - Not in my experience it isn't. And chips come out of …  [+] (15 replies) 09/10/2013 on English 0
User avatar
#244 - blamie (09/10/2013) [-]
Yay it's time to argue semantics, technicalities, and cultural differences. Try staying on topic, and at least TRY to have some humility.
User avatar
#245 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
Did you just ask for us to stay on topic?

You do realise this is the Internet, right?

It's still a fact that English and American English have different words and different pronunciations :s
User avatar
#248 - blamie (09/10/2013) [-]
Yes, and so does Northern "English" a Scottish accent on your "English" Cockney "English" and the Gaelic accent on "English" in that one country your government keeps trying to say is really just more England. And that's just on your island and the one right next to it. And yes, I asked you to stay on topic because you instigated a discussion, and now that your points are being countered and your fallacies pointed out, you are trying to get me to go of about how it's french fries and cookies, and frankly, I don't care.
User avatar
#250 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
Scotland is a separate country.

Gaelic is a separate language, spoken in Wales. It is again, a separate country. The Welsh speak English in an accent, yes.

But the majority of words, though pronounced in different ways, are pronounced the same (or atleast very similarly) phonetically.

It is a fact, still, irrefutably, that time and separation has led to different pronunciations, spellings and uses of words in the US. Why does this bother you so much?
#283 - mymiddleleg Comment deleted by
#261 - tsukaza (09/10/2013) [-]
As a Welsh person I can confirm that Gaelic is not spoken in Wales and has never been a language of ours. Gaelic is Scottish or Irish.
Also, why would you say Scotland is a separate country but not any other country being brought up? :/
User avatar
#264 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
I don't even know why I said Welsh, that was just plain silly.

Welsh is the Welsh language, it's Welsh.

And because blamie mentioned a Scottish accent, but the Scots pronounce the majority of words identically to England and certainly spell them all the same. They also have Gaelic, but nobody other than Edie McCredie and chums on Balamory use it.
#265 - tsukaza (09/10/2013) [-]
I guess you haven't seen a true Scottish then. There's barely a shred of same when they speak.
Never mind the fact that most southern Englishmen can't even converse with most Scotsmen... Yes, they pronounce things that weirdly but *I* can understand them.
User avatar
#266 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
A true Scottish?

My Mum is Scottish.

I lived in Dundee for three years.

Tonight I will be in the pub with a Scottish friend, who is actually ginger.
#269 - tsukaza (09/10/2013) [-]
Many words at all like English people do.*
#267 - tsukaza (09/10/2013) [-]
Then you of all people should know that Scottish people (mostly because of the accent they are rocking) Don't pronounce many words at all to most English people.
If anything it's us Welsh people but even our sing song accent makes it different mostly.
User avatar
#270 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
Ha ha, "sing song accent" is the best description of the Welsh accent I've ever heard.
User avatar
#251 - blamie (09/10/2013) [-]
Because you are acting as if it matters, and as if there is no variation in "English" pronunciations in England, and there is a difference between "English" and "American English" when there is so much variation from place to place, which is retarded in the major degree when the language varied from person to person. We are speaking the same words to each other, with the same grammar and syntax, the same spelling, and the same sentence structure, English is English. Also another point to make is that you are trying to make yourself feel superior to Americans by diluting yourself into thinking that we are speaking different languages.
User avatar
#253 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
Yes, that's exactly what I'm saying.

I've made my points, phonetically the majority of words spoken in Britain are said the same, but in different accents. There are examples of US words which are pronounced entirely differently, examples of which are posted above, such as left-ten-ant to loo-ten-ant.

There are also words which are the same but have different meanings on either side of the point, as I pointed out.

We also have varying spellings and grammar conventions, which you have denied. For example, in the US words are "ized" whereas in the UK they are "ised", and in the US "er" is more common than the "re" used in the UK (e.g. liter/litre).

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_British_English_spelling_differences

www.onestopenglish.com/grammar/grammar-reference/american-english-vs-british-english/differences-in-american-and-british-english-grammar-article/152820.article

Time and distance has lead to two languages, American and British English.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_American_and_British_English
User avatar
#255 - gtaant (09/10/2013) [-]
led* to two languages, sorry.
#5 - Ha, or $10 in the UK.  [+] (1 reply) 09/09/2013 on Gas prices suck 0
User avatar
#6 - metalmind (09/09/2013) [-]
Wow, that's bad.
We really got to get rid of our dependence of oil.
#9 - Not even, she's a square face trollhead.  [+] (2 replies) 09/09/2013 on Mr Spac +1
User avatar
#11 - vindictivenature (09/09/2013) [-]
Well I think she's hot.
#10 - captainthunderfart (09/09/2013) [-]
Trollhead.
#8 - But where's the risk if you're a female character in a game wh…  [+] (5 replies) 09/09/2013 on 1950's Zombie Shooter 0
#13 - anon (09/09/2013) [-]
immune to infection, not death....
User avatar
#10 - Furubatsu (09/09/2013) [-]
Instead of being turned you'd be brutally beaten/eaten to death by the zombies.
User avatar
#54 - lolollo (09/09/2013) [-]
It's not like video games that deal with zombies haven't already been romping all over that plot twist already. At least this game would have a reason your character doesn't have a risk of infection from being bitten. As opposed to Resident Evil where you just lose health, and then eat a green plant to get all better instead of eventually turn into a zombie like literally everyone else would have.

Though I do vaguely remember a resident evil game where that was a game device, you turning into a zombie...
User avatar
#57 - Furubatsu (09/09/2013) [-]
*shrug* not a big fan of zombie games
just answering gtaant's question in my own opinion
User avatar
#90 - lolollo (09/09/2013) [-]
Oh I know, I'm saying you're right.

And if anything, at least this zombie game would have a reason for your character not being zombified from a bite, wheras most other zombie games gloss over that HUGE plothole.