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dudemiesterman

Last status update:
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Gender: male
Date Signed Up:1/03/2010
Last Login:7/23/2016
Location:Texas
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billy mays

latest user's comments

#63 - No, it doesn't. The game was designed to get the average perso…  [+] (6 new replies) 07/15/2016 on Tear Kotaku a new one Pls? 0
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#64 - okamibanshu (07/15/2016) [-]
oh ,so they SHOULDN'T account for everything, ok, so why the fuck make a game then? i'm not saying to change the entire fucking game asshole, i'm saying they should give a way to 'move' around so that we can actually do stuff while stationary. i'm sorry, but your fuckign lieing out yoru ass if you havn't thought yet 'damn, if i could just move over there, but meh, i'll do it tomorrow, later, ignore it' etc, everyones had a moment with this silly app where they wished they could just tap over to a gym/poke stop real fast to grab it, i'm not saying make people able to walk the world, i'm simply saying we shoul dhave a way to 'stock pile' free movement. a 20/1 or 20/5 step ratio that gives you free 'steps' that stop at say....20/30 that allow you to move from a stationary location. i mean, how many times have you, because i know i have, been near a pokestop and that second is is juuuuust out of reach. a step or two towards it could snag it for you, but its not in the way your going out shopping etc, it would be nice to have that ability. you'd still be moble etc, but could use it at night when your not really able to run around, or when your at work on break or something and can't be booking it out. so no you fucking twat, its not just people who are physically unable, some people have jobs, and things to do, and it would STILL be helpeful to be able to move, so get off your high horse, and take a general perspective instead of your narrow cone of vision. I may be an ass with how i'm saying this, but at least i'm looking at it from more then one point of view, there are lots of people with various reasons they can and cannot move or not move, so don't be a prick and focus on one thing, if you do you miss a whole hell of a lot in the long run, an di'm not just talking about pokemon go.
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#65 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
The first sentence of that was all i needed to read to see how retarded you are.
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#66 - okamibanshu (07/15/2016) [-]
lol, yeah, you sorta prove my point. You refuse to see anything past yoru narrow view ok. Well at least i can stop wasting my time, you really should stop focusing on one thing, your life will be so much better and you'll get to do a lot more awesome shit, goodbye.
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#67 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
hahahaha wasting your time what better thing do you have to do? Go break your arm and blame it on the Overwatch developers? Or maybe you should quit your job and tell Addy it's his fault. Face it you're a selfish cunt. Just because you have a disability that means you've been wronged? Get over yourself. The game is helping people with both physical and psychological disorders/disabilities go out and experience the world. Shut the fuck up.
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#68 - okamibanshu (07/15/2016) [-]
you can stop, i already said i'm done wasting my time with you i won't respond after this and i'm not bothering reading what yoru typing, your pigheaded, stubborn and ridged in your views, i try not to bother with people like you when i've determined they wont' change, or bend or anything else in that way, so have fun try not to run into any parked cares, and keep in mind a narrow field of vision leaves out a lot of things that you'd see otherwise.
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#69 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
Okay have fun I'm glad your not reading about how cool and amazing and awesome I think you are for bitching.
#53 - Yeah, like in a ton of places all over the world. Just like in… 07/15/2016 on TBH Fam... 0
#47 - Because you've been taught that socialism is bad bad bad. 07/15/2016 on I'm With Her 0
#58 - It's not bringing it up unprovoked because WHEN YOU'RE OBESE Y…  [+] (1 new reply) 07/15/2016 on Punch people for assuming... 0
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#60 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Well, yes, it is bringing it up unprovoked unless they bring it up first. That's what "bringing it up unprovoked" means. You mentioned it without them bringing it up first.

Their progress could also be a lowering of their blood pressure, a change in their energy levels, etc. Such changes could occur with minimal weight loss. Just being more active can give you more energy even if your weight doesn't change significantly. And, again, they may not be monitoring their weight. Other health factors exist that may concern them more greatly. Or, again, they may be running solely to feel better and not with the specific goal of losing weight.

But, yes, you're right, It'd be fine as long as he brings up how much weight he's lost. You were able to ask that without seeming insensitive by simply using the word "progress." You're not supposed to assume that somebody is going to be happy to talk to you about how much weight they've lost. They may not want to talk about that for various reasons.
#55 - >> #53 , 07/15/2016 on Punch people for assuming... 0
#54 - No, i eliminate the risk of upsetting a baby who doesn't actua…  [+] (3 new replies) 07/15/2016 on Punch people for assuming... 0
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#57 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Right, in the same way that recognizing somebody is missing or limb or has bad acne is "just an observation." You don't just bring that shit up unprovoked. And, if you do, you do it in a way more diplomatic manner than simply pointing it out matter-of-factly.

Somebody who really wants to lose weight may recognize that they are fat and need to lose weight, but still be sensitive about their weight and not really want to have it brought up by ham-fisted questions. A friend of mine who was overweight for much of his childhood and then became fit is still grappling with insecurities about his weight or being called fat, despite having a much healthier physique these days. He's not going to throw a tantrum if somebody calls him fat or ask him how much weight he's lost if they see him running, but he's not going to feel stellar about it, either.

Besides, all the character said was that they feel great. They may not have began running with any weight loss goals in mind. It might have been part of an unrelated therapy or just a conscious decision to be more active and thus have more energy (hence, feeling great). They may not even know how much weight they've lost, or the weight they were to begin with, so even if the question doesn't strike them as rude, it may be totally useless as a question. So, again, asking "how much progress" they have made remains the overall better phrasing.
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#58 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
It's not bringing it up unprovoked because WHEN YOU'RE OBESE YOU WORKOUT TO LOSE WEIGHT, IT'S YOUR PROGRESS. I mean there's only so many times I can say that. If you're at the gym and some guy who weighs 320 lbs strikes up a conversation about how much better he feels since working out, and how inactive he was, he feels better because he's lost weight. He won't get mad at you for asking how much weight he's lost, and if you ask him how much progress he made he's going to tell you how much weight he's lost.
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#60 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Well, yes, it is bringing it up unprovoked unless they bring it up first. That's what "bringing it up unprovoked" means. You mentioned it without them bringing it up first.

Their progress could also be a lowering of their blood pressure, a change in their energy levels, etc. Such changes could occur with minimal weight loss. Just being more active can give you more energy even if your weight doesn't change significantly. And, again, they may not be monitoring their weight. Other health factors exist that may concern them more greatly. Or, again, they may be running solely to feel better and not with the specific goal of losing weight.

But, yes, you're right, It'd be fine as long as he brings up how much weight he's lost. You were able to ask that without seeming insensitive by simply using the word "progress." You're not supposed to assume that somebody is going to be happy to talk to you about how much weight they've lost. They may not want to talk about that for various reasons.
#53 - Also, why wouldn't i ask it as progress? Because like i alread… 07/15/2016 on Punch people for assuming... 0
#51 - Yes, it is. If the topic of conversation is the amount of prog…  [+] (7 new replies) 07/15/2016 on Punch people for assuming... 0
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#53 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
Also, why wouldn't i ask it as progress? Because like i already told you, if they're obese then they're working out to lose weight and that is their progress so it's not remotely insensitive to ask about it.
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#52 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Right, so just use the word "progress" instead of "weight" and you completely eliminate the risk of potentially insulting this person.
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#55 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
>>#53,
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#54 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
No, i eliminate the risk of upsetting a baby who doesn't actually care about their progress. Recognizing that someone is overweight is not an insult, it's an observation.
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#57 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Right, in the same way that recognizing somebody is missing or limb or has bad acne is "just an observation." You don't just bring that shit up unprovoked. And, if you do, you do it in a way more diplomatic manner than simply pointing it out matter-of-factly.

Somebody who really wants to lose weight may recognize that they are fat and need to lose weight, but still be sensitive about their weight and not really want to have it brought up by ham-fisted questions. A friend of mine who was overweight for much of his childhood and then became fit is still grappling with insecurities about his weight or being called fat, despite having a much healthier physique these days. He's not going to throw a tantrum if somebody calls him fat or ask him how much weight he's lost if they see him running, but he's not going to feel stellar about it, either.

Besides, all the character said was that they feel great. They may not have began running with any weight loss goals in mind. It might have been part of an unrelated therapy or just a conscious decision to be more active and thus have more energy (hence, feeling great). They may not even know how much weight they've lost, or the weight they were to begin with, so even if the question doesn't strike them as rude, it may be totally useless as a question. So, again, asking "how much progress" they have made remains the overall better phrasing.
User avatar
#58 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
It's not bringing it up unprovoked because WHEN YOU'RE OBESE YOU WORKOUT TO LOSE WEIGHT, IT'S YOUR PROGRESS. I mean there's only so many times I can say that. If you're at the gym and some guy who weighs 320 lbs strikes up a conversation about how much better he feels since working out, and how inactive he was, he feels better because he's lost weight. He won't get mad at you for asking how much weight he's lost, and if you ask him how much progress he made he's going to tell you how much weight he's lost.
User avatar
#60 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Well, yes, it is bringing it up unprovoked unless they bring it up first. That's what "bringing it up unprovoked" means. You mentioned it without them bringing it up first.

Their progress could also be a lowering of their blood pressure, a change in their energy levels, etc. Such changes could occur with minimal weight loss. Just being more active can give you more energy even if your weight doesn't change significantly. And, again, they may not be monitoring their weight. Other health factors exist that may concern them more greatly. Or, again, they may be running solely to feel better and not with the specific goal of losing weight.

But, yes, you're right, It'd be fine as long as he brings up how much weight he's lost. You were able to ask that without seeming insensitive by simply using the word "progress." You're not supposed to assume that somebody is going to be happy to talk to you about how much weight they've lost. They may not want to talk about that for various reasons.
#47 - No, that's not what happened. An obese character said "I …  [+] (9 new replies) 07/15/2016 on Punch people for assuming... 0
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#49 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
It's insensitive to ask anybody anything about their weight unless the topic of the conversation was already their weight, or you're their fucking doctor. That's Social Interaction 101 type shit. There's 8 million better ways to talk to that person, like asking how far they ran just now or if they want a jogging partner. And, again, you can just ask if they've been making much progress or how much progress they've made. You already used that phrasing yourself, in your first reply to me. It's an infinitely better way to broach the subject, so why not just do that?
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#51 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
Yes, it is. If the topic of conversation is the amount of progress the obese person has made, then their weight is part of that topic. Either they're sensitive and that's why they're working out, or they're not sensitive about and wouldn't care that you said it.
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#53 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
Also, why wouldn't i ask it as progress? Because like i already told you, if they're obese then they're working out to lose weight and that is their progress so it's not remotely insensitive to ask about it.
User avatar
#52 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Right, so just use the word "progress" instead of "weight" and you completely eliminate the risk of potentially insulting this person.
User avatar
#55 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
>>#53,
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#54 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
No, i eliminate the risk of upsetting a baby who doesn't actually care about their progress. Recognizing that someone is overweight is not an insult, it's an observation.
User avatar
#57 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Right, in the same way that recognizing somebody is missing or limb or has bad acne is "just an observation." You don't just bring that shit up unprovoked. And, if you do, you do it in a way more diplomatic manner than simply pointing it out matter-of-factly.

Somebody who really wants to lose weight may recognize that they are fat and need to lose weight, but still be sensitive about their weight and not really want to have it brought up by ham-fisted questions. A friend of mine who was overweight for much of his childhood and then became fit is still grappling with insecurities about his weight or being called fat, despite having a much healthier physique these days. He's not going to throw a tantrum if somebody calls him fat or ask him how much weight he's lost if they see him running, but he's not going to feel stellar about it, either.

Besides, all the character said was that they feel great. They may not have began running with any weight loss goals in mind. It might have been part of an unrelated therapy or just a conscious decision to be more active and thus have more energy (hence, feeling great). They may not even know how much weight they've lost, or the weight they were to begin with, so even if the question doesn't strike them as rude, it may be totally useless as a question. So, again, asking "how much progress" they have made remains the overall better phrasing.
User avatar
#58 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
It's not bringing it up unprovoked because WHEN YOU'RE OBESE YOU WORKOUT TO LOSE WEIGHT, IT'S YOUR PROGRESS. I mean there's only so many times I can say that. If you're at the gym and some guy who weighs 320 lbs strikes up a conversation about how much better he feels since working out, and how inactive he was, he feels better because he's lost weight. He won't get mad at you for asking how much weight he's lost, and if you ask him how much progress he made he's going to tell you how much weight he's lost.
User avatar
#60 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Well, yes, it is bringing it up unprovoked unless they bring it up first. That's what "bringing it up unprovoked" means. You mentioned it without them bringing it up first.

Their progress could also be a lowering of their blood pressure, a change in their energy levels, etc. Such changes could occur with minimal weight loss. Just being more active can give you more energy even if your weight doesn't change significantly. And, again, they may not be monitoring their weight. Other health factors exist that may concern them more greatly. Or, again, they may be running solely to feel better and not with the specific goal of losing weight.

But, yes, you're right, It'd be fine as long as he brings up how much weight he's lost. You were able to ask that without seeming insensitive by simply using the word "progress." You're not supposed to assume that somebody is going to be happy to talk to you about how much weight they've lost. They may not want to talk about that for various reasons.
#45 - Because, as i've just established (since we're going to act hi…  [+] (11 new replies) 07/15/2016 on Punch people for assuming... +1
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#46 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
But starting "a conversation with someone just to ask how much they've lost" is exactly what happened in the content, and exactly what I was saying would be shitty.

"How much weight have you lost?" is not a kosher response to an overweight person saying "man, I feel awesome!"
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#47 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
No, that's not what happened. An obese character said "I feel great since i started working out." Remind me how it's insensitive to ask how much weight the obese person lost.

Obese people lose weight when working out. If they're sensitive about their weight, then that's why they're working out and they'd probably love to tell you how much they've lost. If you're obese and gaining weight from working out then you're not working out and you just want praise.
User avatar
#49 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
It's insensitive to ask anybody anything about their weight unless the topic of the conversation was already their weight, or you're their fucking doctor. That's Social Interaction 101 type shit. There's 8 million better ways to talk to that person, like asking how far they ran just now or if they want a jogging partner. And, again, you can just ask if they've been making much progress or how much progress they've made. You already used that phrasing yourself, in your first reply to me. It's an infinitely better way to broach the subject, so why not just do that?
User avatar
#51 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
Yes, it is. If the topic of conversation is the amount of progress the obese person has made, then their weight is part of that topic. Either they're sensitive and that's why they're working out, or they're not sensitive about and wouldn't care that you said it.
User avatar
#53 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
Also, why wouldn't i ask it as progress? Because like i already told you, if they're obese then they're working out to lose weight and that is their progress so it's not remotely insensitive to ask about it.
User avatar
#52 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Right, so just use the word "progress" instead of "weight" and you completely eliminate the risk of potentially insulting this person.
User avatar
#55 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
>>#53,
User avatar
#54 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
No, i eliminate the risk of upsetting a baby who doesn't actually care about their progress. Recognizing that someone is overweight is not an insult, it's an observation.
User avatar
#57 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Right, in the same way that recognizing somebody is missing or limb or has bad acne is "just an observation." You don't just bring that shit up unprovoked. And, if you do, you do it in a way more diplomatic manner than simply pointing it out matter-of-factly.

Somebody who really wants to lose weight may recognize that they are fat and need to lose weight, but still be sensitive about their weight and not really want to have it brought up by ham-fisted questions. A friend of mine who was overweight for much of his childhood and then became fit is still grappling with insecurities about his weight or being called fat, despite having a much healthier physique these days. He's not going to throw a tantrum if somebody calls him fat or ask him how much weight he's lost if they see him running, but he's not going to feel stellar about it, either.

Besides, all the character said was that they feel great. They may not have began running with any weight loss goals in mind. It might have been part of an unrelated therapy or just a conscious decision to be more active and thus have more energy (hence, feeling great). They may not even know how much weight they've lost, or the weight they were to begin with, so even if the question doesn't strike them as rude, it may be totally useless as a question. So, again, asking "how much progress" they have made remains the overall better phrasing.
User avatar
#58 - dudemiesterman (07/15/2016) [-]
It's not bringing it up unprovoked because WHEN YOU'RE OBESE YOU WORKOUT TO LOSE WEIGHT, IT'S YOUR PROGRESS. I mean there's only so many times I can say that. If you're at the gym and some guy who weighs 320 lbs strikes up a conversation about how much better he feels since working out, and how inactive he was, he feels better because he's lost weight. He won't get mad at you for asking how much weight he's lost, and if you ask him how much progress he made he's going to tell you how much weight he's lost.
User avatar
#60 - schneidend (07/15/2016) [-]
Well, yes, it is bringing it up unprovoked unless they bring it up first. That's what "bringing it up unprovoked" means. You mentioned it without them bringing it up first.

Their progress could also be a lowering of their blood pressure, a change in their energy levels, etc. Such changes could occur with minimal weight loss. Just being more active can give you more energy even if your weight doesn't change significantly. And, again, they may not be monitoring their weight. Other health factors exist that may concern them more greatly. Or, again, they may be running solely to feel better and not with the specific goal of losing weight.

But, yes, you're right, It'd be fine as long as he brings up how much weight he's lost. You were able to ask that without seeming insensitive by simply using the word "progress." You're not supposed to assume that somebody is going to be happy to talk to you about how much weight they've lost. They may not want to talk about that for various reasons.