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derpyllama

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Date Signed Up:11/18/2012
Last Login:12/22/2014
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Comment Ranking:#14425
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Highest Comment Rank:#8786
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#55 - This whole scene is kind of silly. See my comment 50. … 11/20/2014 on a few more centuries... +1
#50 - Assuming a non-rotating neutron star makes the math pretty eas…  [+] (2 new replies) 11/20/2014 on a few more centuries... +9
#145 - anonymous (11/20/2014) [-]
The planet they are on is orbiting a black hole, very close and very quickly
User avatar #70 - ninjalllama (11/20/2014) [-]
hey it's my clever version
#48 - GPS satellites have to account for special relativity too sinc… 11/20/2014 on a few more centuries... 0
#47 - Astrophysics grad student here. They messed up quite …  [+] (6 new replies) 11/20/2014 on a few more centuries... +23
User avatar #159 - Whetstone (11/20/2014) [-]
Maybe I'm wrong, but I also feel like the environment of that first planet close to the black hole was off. If that planet were orbiting that close, the difference in gravity from the surface opposite to the black hole and the difference in gravity from the surface closest to the black hole would cause extreme tidal forces (similar in a way to Jupiter's moon Io) on the planet kneading the planet like dough creating large amounts of heat in its core. And with that, the planet should have been a more hot and volcanic planet.
#116 - lolpakka (11/20/2014) [-]
That whole part smelled like bullshit for me, especially with it's end scene. The smell of the screenwriters sweat while trying to figure out how to make some conflict at last has almost hit my nose.

Why did they visit that planet at all, if they knew about the huge dilatation?
How comes that noone has seen those huge tidal waves from orbit?
Why did they go down in person if that robot could have done the whole job alone, and if they had to go down for some strange reason, why did they start to go on a tour in the 130% gravity on foot, and waste time, if the robot could have rolled out, collect the debris and come back to ship in 20 seconds?
#105 - leadtroll (11/20/2014) [-]
mfw science
User avatar #103 - talldude (11/20/2014) [-]
No, Gargantua was a spinning super-massive black hole, not a neutron star. Kip Thorne himself designed the planet and the black hole so that the science would be correct.
User avatar #92 - capslockrage (11/20/2014) [-]
I really don't think the exact accuracy of their ideas really matters that much, i think the only part that truly counts is that their general ideas are physically possible, in which case they were.

And for the spinning the space craft I think it more along the lines of extremely unlikely rather than impossible, and they didn't slow down the main craft, they just put their small one into a spin to match its speed.
User avatar #132 - durkadurka (11/20/2014) [-]
For the spinning he's saying that the craft will only spin about the docking port if the center of gravity is in line with it. If not the docking port will travel in a circle around the spacecraft's center of gravity when spinning

You could say that losing that part of the spacecraft happened to move the center of gravity in line with the docking port, but that'd mean the thing was initially designed with an off-center center of gravity.

It's also unlikely that the explosion would only spin the craft about one axis, but again not impossible.
#4 - >hard on pirates  [+] (1 new reply) 11/15/2014 on Pirates +1
#11 - isonig (11/15/2014) [-]
Get out.
#190 - There are a lot of choices, but you just try a bunch of things… 11/09/2014 on FJ Random Contest (November... 0
#179 - You will need to take physics classes next probably. There ver…  [+] (2 new replies) 11/08/2014 on FJ Random Contest (November... 0
User avatar #189 - CHARGERZ (11/09/2014) [-]
Yeah lots of different branches to jump into so many choices. So what made want to get into astronomy?
#190 - derpyllama (11/09/2014) [-]
There are a lot of choices, but you just try a bunch of things and do what you enjoy the most.
I entered my university as just a physics major and then took a few astro classes and loved them. I think I officially switched to astro after I took the observational astronomy course.
#117 - It's a lot of work, but it's pretty awesome. As a grad student…  [+] (4 new replies) 11/08/2014 on FJ Random Contest (November... 0
User avatar #154 - CHARGERZ (11/08/2014) [-]
I have too many questions. im at the beginning of a possible journey in astronomy. going to community college and in astronomy class now. what class to take next? i did not see any other astronomy classes, maybe at the university there is more?

when you observe do you observe anything you want? I like to solve problems and ask questions not sure where i would fit in. and i really like the universe but not sure what the jobs are like. how many years have you been studying?
#179 - derpyllama (11/08/2014) [-]
You will need to take physics classes next probably. There very few universities that offer a bachelors degree in just astronomy. Generally there is a 2 semester series/3 quarter series intro physics with calculus course. As far as the math goes, you will need at least calc I, calc II, multi variable calc (which is sometimes calc III) and ordinary differential equations (ODEs).
After that, it's mostly physics courses and whatever upper division astro classes your university would offer. I took planetary science, stellar astrophysics I and II, observational astronomy, and Galaxies/Cosmology for elective astro courses in addition to all my physics courses.

It depends on what you're trying to do. I run night labs for undergrad intro courses right now, and we get to point the telescopes at whatever we can see with 8 inch telescopes. But for my research, I'll be using a much larger more expensive telescope, and I will need to plan pretty much every minute that I'm there. I did choose my own research topic though.

As far as jobs go, there are actually quite a few options. The obvious one is becoming a tenure track professor, but there are also research professors who don't teach, lecturers who don't really do research, or private industry research (Lockheed Martin has a large solar physics group). And if you get all the way through grad school and decide that you don't want to do astronomy any more, companies like astronomers because of what problem solving skills you end up with, and they pay you more than a professor anyway haha.

I've been studying for about 5 years.
User avatar #189 - CHARGERZ (11/09/2014) [-]
Yeah lots of different branches to jump into so many choices. So what made want to get into astronomy?
#190 - derpyllama (11/09/2014) [-]
There are a lot of choices, but you just try a bunch of things and do what you enjoy the most.
I entered my university as just a physics major and then took a few astro classes and loved them. I think I officially switched to astro after I took the observational astronomy course.
#93 - Oh, and here's a pretty image of the Orion Nebula that I took … 11/08/2014 on FJ Random Contest (November... 0
#91 - Not really a drawing, but it is something that I did and it's …  [+] (7 new replies) 11/08/2014 on FJ Random Contest (November... 0
User avatar #106 - CHARGERZ (11/08/2014) [-]
So whats it like being an astronomer? i think i wanna do something in that field.
#117 - derpyllama (11/08/2014) [-]
It's a lot of work, but it's pretty awesome. As a grad student I just learn about space all day every day haha.
There are a lot of options within astronomy depending on what you like to do. Some people like observing more, others like making simulations, or if you're into the math part of it you could do theory work. I do mostly observing right now.

I can try to answer any more specific questions you have about it.
User avatar #154 - CHARGERZ (11/08/2014) [-]
I have too many questions. im at the beginning of a possible journey in astronomy. going to community college and in astronomy class now. what class to take next? i did not see any other astronomy classes, maybe at the university there is more?

when you observe do you observe anything you want? I like to solve problems and ask questions not sure where i would fit in. and i really like the universe but not sure what the jobs are like. how many years have you been studying?
#179 - derpyllama (11/08/2014) [-]
You will need to take physics classes next probably. There very few universities that offer a bachelors degree in just astronomy. Generally there is a 2 semester series/3 quarter series intro physics with calculus course. As far as the math goes, you will need at least calc I, calc II, multi variable calc (which is sometimes calc III) and ordinary differential equations (ODEs).
After that, it's mostly physics courses and whatever upper division astro classes your university would offer. I took planetary science, stellar astrophysics I and II, observational astronomy, and Galaxies/Cosmology for elective astro courses in addition to all my physics courses.

It depends on what you're trying to do. I run night labs for undergrad intro courses right now, and we get to point the telescopes at whatever we can see with 8 inch telescopes. But for my research, I'll be using a much larger more expensive telescope, and I will need to plan pretty much every minute that I'm there. I did choose my own research topic though.

As far as jobs go, there are actually quite a few options. The obvious one is becoming a tenure track professor, but there are also research professors who don't teach, lecturers who don't really do research, or private industry research (Lockheed Martin has a large solar physics group). And if you get all the way through grad school and decide that you don't want to do astronomy any more, companies like astronomers because of what problem solving skills you end up with, and they pay you more than a professor anyway haha.

I've been studying for about 5 years.
User avatar #189 - CHARGERZ (11/09/2014) [-]
Yeah lots of different branches to jump into so many choices. So what made want to get into astronomy?
#190 - derpyllama (11/09/2014) [-]
There are a lot of choices, but you just try a bunch of things and do what you enjoy the most.
I entered my university as just a physics major and then took a few astro classes and loved them. I think I officially switched to astro after I took the observational astronomy course.
#93 - derpyllama (11/08/2014) [-]
Oh, and here's a pretty image of the Orion Nebula that I took and reduced on the same observing run.
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