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datargumme

Last status update:
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Date Signed Up:11/21/2011
Last Login:7/25/2016
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Highest Content Rank:#1836
Highest Comment Rank:#1871
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Level 152 Content: Faptastic → Level 153 Content: Faptastic
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Level 266 Comments: Pure Win → Level 267 Comments: Pure Win
Subscribers:3
Content Views:143711
Times Content Favorited:192 times
Total Comments Made:1244
FJ Points:11877

latest user's comments

#45 - I ******* love minsesweeper 06/17/2015 on Muh Achievement 0
#28 - I did not consider that, i should probably have taken the hint…  [+] (1 new reply) 06/15/2015 on Laminar Flow and Corn Syrup 0
#29 - anon (06/15/2015) [-]
I would say that gravitational potential shouldn't be the context that this is thought of in. The main potential to consider when mixing is diffusion potential, or any sort of potential associated directly with the dissolution of one material into another. In this case, that is also negligible, but for something like saltwater, it explains why it is such an energy-intensive task to turn a mixture back into a pure. Also, it explains why mixing a concentrated acid with water generates heat without a chemical reaction taking place.
#27 - I might have considered the heat added by the turning it to be…  [+] (1 new reply) 06/15/2015 on Laminar Flow and Corn Syrup +3
User avatar
#35 - inyourmind (06/15/2015) [-]
it should also be noted that the droplets are a bit larger/spread out when they come back. But just as anon said it's not a closed system so the second law of thermodynamics does not really apply here.
#42 - As stated in comment 41, alloys is not metals, they area chemi…  [+] (7 new replies) 06/15/2015 on Obama is smooth as f... -7
User avatar
#55 - veneficium (06/15/2015) [-]
metals + nonmetals make salts...
#54 - anon (06/15/2015) [-]
Aight, I see how it is.
#48 - corps (06/15/2015) [-]
"alloys is not metals, they area chemical bound"

Dude, do you have a concussion or something?
#44 - unclewalrus (06/15/2015) [-]
Dictionaries, brah.
User avatar
#43 - Kairyuka (06/15/2015) [-]
#50 - flamerun (06/15/2015) [-]
What does that spell do?
#51 - Kairyuka (06/15/2015) [-]
Conjures one processor
#41 - Alloys are cunstructed by a chemical bound with metals and a n…  [+] (2 new replies) 06/15/2015 on Obama is smooth as f... -5
#47 - unclewalrus (06/15/2015) [-]
Nigga, that's an ionic compound. Most commonly a salt.
User avatar
#45 - brokentrucker (06/15/2015) [-]
al·loy
noun
ˈaˌloi/
1.
a metal made by combining two or more metallic elements, especially to give greater strength or resistance to corrosion.
"an alloy of nickel, bronze, and zinc"
synonyms: mixture, mix, amalgam, fusion, meld, blend, compound, combination, composite, union; technicaladmixture
"modern pewter is an alloy of tin, copper, and antimony"
verb
ˈaˌloi,əˈloi/
1.
mix (metals) to make an alloy.
"alloying tin with copper to make bronze"
synonyms: mixture, mix, amalgam, fusion, meld, blend, compound, combination, composite, union; technicaladmixture
"modern pewter is an alloy of tin, copper, and antimony"
#24 - It is fake, it violates the second law of thermodynamics(entro…  [+] (8 new replies) 06/15/2015 on Laminar Flow and Corn Syrup +2
#34 - anon (06/15/2015) [-]
or you can just see that his finger moves the exact same way but in reverse near the start and near the end
#31 - anon (06/15/2015) [-]
Jesus fucking Christ it's called Laminar Flow you mugs. It says it in the title ffs.

Fucking Entropy, are you 18?
#26 - anon (06/15/2015) [-]
Open system, and the droplets were never "mixed" in an entropic sense. It is more accurate to think of it as being smeared through the corn starch substrate. It isn't any lower in energy than it was at its initial conditions. The fluid is too viscous for that kind of interaction to happen on a reasonable timescale.
User avatar
#28 - datargumme (06/15/2015) [-]
I did not consider that, i should probably have taken the hint in the video, since the droplets stayed at the same heights, which would not be the case if the droplets dispersed.
#29 - anon (06/15/2015) [-]
I would say that gravitational potential shouldn't be the context that this is thought of in. The main potential to consider when mixing is diffusion potential, or any sort of potential associated directly with the dissolution of one material into another. In this case, that is also negligible, but for something like saltwater, it explains why it is such an energy-intensive task to turn a mixture back into a pure. Also, it explains why mixing a concentrated acid with water generates heat without a chemical reaction taking place.
#25 - anon (06/15/2015) [-]
Here's an other example of the same thing.
m.youtube.com/watch?v=p08_KlTKP50

It's not a closed system, so entropy doesn't need to increase. I don't know what the Gibbs and Helmholtz energies would be in this particular system, but it's not like reversible processes don't exist, which is what you're implying.
User avatar
#27 - datargumme (06/15/2015) [-]
I might have considered the heat added by the turning it to be way more significant than is probabl is. You might be right, since there is no appearant reason for themal energy to increase, meaning constant enthalpy, and the heat added from the movement might he so insignificant that entropy is appoxamately constant, meaning a somewhat constant Helmholtz. I should have given it a bit more thought before spewing out what my intuition tells me frp, introductory thermodynamics course
User avatar
#35 - inyourmind (06/15/2015) [-]
it should also be noted that the droplets are a bit larger/spread out when they come back. But just as anon said it's not a closed system so the second law of thermodynamics does not really apply here.
#14 - You dont really invent metals..  [+] (14 new replies) 06/14/2015 on Obama is smooth as f... -14
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#18 - magictheg (06/15/2015) [-]
Alloys are metals, you invent alloys.
User avatar
#41 - datargumme (06/15/2015) [-]
Alloys are cunstructed by a chemical bound with metals and a nonmetal, meaning that it is not a metal.
#47 - unclewalrus (06/15/2015) [-]
Nigga, that's an ionic compound. Most commonly a salt.
User avatar
#45 - brokentrucker (06/15/2015) [-]
al·loy
noun
ˈaˌloi/
1.
a metal made by combining two or more metallic elements, especially to give greater strength or resistance to corrosion.
"an alloy of nickel, bronze, and zinc"
synonyms: mixture, mix, amalgam, fusion, meld, blend, compound, combination, composite, union; technicaladmixture
"modern pewter is an alloy of tin, copper, and antimony"
verb
ˈaˌloi,əˈloi/
1.
mix (metals) to make an alloy.
"alloying tin with copper to make bronze"
synonyms: mixture, mix, amalgam, fusion, meld, blend, compound, combination, composite, union; technicaladmixture
"modern pewter is an alloy of tin, copper, and antimony"
#16 - gasur (06/14/2015) [-]
You can - sort of. You can make new metals by combinding different elements such as heating some metals together. For example a bronze alloy was "invented".
User avatar
#42 - datargumme (06/15/2015) [-]
As stated in comment 41, alloys is not metals, they area chemical bound between metals and nonmetal.
User avatar
#55 - veneficium (06/15/2015) [-]
metals + nonmetals make salts...
#54 - anon (06/15/2015) [-]
Aight, I see how it is.
#48 - corps (06/15/2015) [-]
"alloys is not metals, they area chemical bound"

Dude, do you have a concussion or something?
#44 - unclewalrus (06/15/2015) [-]
Dictionaries, brah.
User avatar
#43 - Kairyuka (06/15/2015) [-]
#50 - flamerun (06/15/2015) [-]
What does that spell do?
#51 - Kairyuka (06/15/2015) [-]
Conjures one processor
#27 - anon (06/15/2015) [-]
Not to mention there are quite a few "metals" on the periodic table that exist because humans synthesized them, whether by accident or on purpose.
#29 - But as you can see, he is only given 3 digits, meaning the 4th… 06/14/2015 on Me irl 0
#24 - It has to do with the number of significant digits, if it is a…  [+] (2 new replies) 06/14/2015 on Me irl +1
User avatar
#26 - mendelevium (06/14/2015) [-]
In chemistry, physics, and bio they make you round to the nearest 5 (at least in my classes)

User avatar
#29 - datargumme (06/14/2015) [-]
But as you can see, he is only given 3 digits, meaning the 4th digits of the answer in in fact unknown. The only reason for giving more than 3 digit in the answer, would be if you were informed that the 4th and latter digits were zero, which in not appearent in the picture.

But you do indeed give your answer in 5 digits if you are given atleast 5 digits of all the numbers that take part of he calculation, which is actually quite
If you doubt it, you can read the second chapter of An Introduction to Error Analysis By John R. Taylor.
#94 - I study physics and aroung 1/3 of us is female. 06/05/2015 on Logic 0