carlonord

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Date Signed Up:7/30/2012
Last Login:1/31/2015
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latest user's comments

#20 - ... Holy **** it's sharknado all over again. 12/20/2014 on George R. R. Martin 0
#2 - My grandpa always said: "If you wanna learn french, go to…  [+] (1 new reply) 12/20/2014 on But shit, it was 99 cents 0
User avatar #18 - jdrinfantry (12/20/2014) [-]
French classes fucking suck. I studied it for 3 years and then I went to Paris, I was baffled and didn't understand a word.

Your grandpa is a wise man.
#51 - He could've sliced them very carefully, either way it's irrele… 12/20/2014 on Drugs are Bad +2
#3 - Not a girl, but I believe I have the answer for ya. There are …  [+] (2 new replies) 12/20/2014 on Be kind to your pets this... 0
User avatar #12 - fuzzyballs (12/20/2014) [-]
you are not a clever man
#7 - kompel (12/20/2014) [-]
Because a whore picks her clothes based on 'what feels good'.
#148 - When I was like 3 years old, my parents took me to Marine Land… 12/20/2014 on Why kids suck 0
#32 - Source on modern warp drive: 12/18/2014 on HALO LOREMASTER: Slipspace 0
#3 - Picture 12/15/2014 on More Triggers Than Columbine +1
#45 - Picture 12/14/2014 on the Sun News On Gamergate +2
#18 - Picture 12/14/2014 on Bo Burnham +1
#45 - Not in college yet, still want to learn though. But how does t…  [+] (1 new reply) 12/14/2014 on Money 0
User avatar #47 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
person A needs x money, so person B lends them x money

after y amount of time, A pays B x money + q money to pay for the opportunity cost of B not having x money for y amount of time

if B says "no, I'm not lending you x money," then there are three reasons:
1.)he doesn't have x money
2.)he can't afford the opportunity cost of not having x money for y amount of time
3.) he doesn't trust A to repay x+q money

for a country, 1 and 2 don't make sense. the countries made up the money in the first place, so for them, it's not real, tangible stuff. They definitely have x money, and they don't have any problems with parting with it for y amount of time.
plus, the country WANTS to lend the money, because it means long-term profit for them, so regardless of whether or not they like each other, it's in their financial interest to do the transaction. so the only reason why they wouldn't borrow the money is if they didn't trust the country to repay them.
debt can (in a round-about way) be correlated with trustworthiness.
#43 - Not worried, just curious. I like to learn and like to be info…  [+] (3 new replies) 12/14/2014 on Money 0
User avatar #44 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
if you're in college, I would definitely suggest taking at least an intro macro-econ class.

it's interesting to learn that on a country-sized scale, money almost works the opposite of how you think it should.

for example, debt=good
if you don't have debt, it means no one trusts you enough to let you borrow. ahem Greece
User avatar #45 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
Not in college yet, still want to learn though. But how does that make sense? I know that a country is supposed to function while in debt (not how or why mind you, but I just know it's supposed to and that the US has gone off the deep end in that regard), but how does that translate into a trust issue?
User avatar #47 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
person A needs x money, so person B lends them x money

after y amount of time, A pays B x money + q money to pay for the opportunity cost of B not having x money for y amount of time

if B says "no, I'm not lending you x money," then there are three reasons:
1.)he doesn't have x money
2.)he can't afford the opportunity cost of not having x money for y amount of time
3.) he doesn't trust A to repay x+q money

for a country, 1 and 2 don't make sense. the countries made up the money in the first place, so for them, it's not real, tangible stuff. They definitely have x money, and they don't have any problems with parting with it for y amount of time.
plus, the country WANTS to lend the money, because it means long-term profit for them, so regardless of whether or not they like each other, it's in their financial interest to do the transaction. so the only reason why they wouldn't borrow the money is if they didn't trust the country to repay them.
debt can (in a round-about way) be correlated with trustworthiness.
#40 - So you seem to know what's up, what is causing it then? You do…  [+] (5 new replies) 12/14/2014 on Money 0
User avatar #42 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
pretty much the things I just mentioned in my last sentence.

wikipedia does a pretty decent job of covering the different theories
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inflation#Causes

but in case you're worried about it, there's no need to be. inflation isn't necessarily a bad thing (in fact a low and steady rate of inflation is preferred). it's only bad when inflation happens at a high rate in a short amount of time.
inflation-meh
hyperinflation-holyshitwe'rescrewed
User avatar #43 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
Not worried, just curious. I like to learn and like to be informed about what's going on and why, especially when the US is so close with Canada in terms of relations. Thanks man, have a good night.
User avatar #44 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
if you're in college, I would definitely suggest taking at least an intro macro-econ class.

it's interesting to learn that on a country-sized scale, money almost works the opposite of how you think it should.

for example, debt=good
if you don't have debt, it means no one trusts you enough to let you borrow. ahem Greece
User avatar #45 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
Not in college yet, still want to learn though. But how does that make sense? I know that a country is supposed to function while in debt (not how or why mind you, but I just know it's supposed to and that the US has gone off the deep end in that regard), but how does that translate into a trust issue?
User avatar #47 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
person A needs x money, so person B lends them x money

after y amount of time, A pays B x money + q money to pay for the opportunity cost of B not having x money for y amount of time

if B says "no, I'm not lending you x money," then there are three reasons:
1.)he doesn't have x money
2.)he can't afford the opportunity cost of not having x money for y amount of time
3.) he doesn't trust A to repay x+q money

for a country, 1 and 2 don't make sense. the countries made up the money in the first place, so for them, it's not real, tangible stuff. They definitely have x money, and they don't have any problems with parting with it for y amount of time.
plus, the country WANTS to lend the money, because it means long-term profit for them, so regardless of whether or not they like each other, it's in their financial interest to do the transaction. so the only reason why they wouldn't borrow the money is if they didn't trust the country to repay them.
debt can (in a round-about way) be correlated with trustworthiness.
#37 - I'm no economist, but that seems to make enough sense. The mai…  [+] (7 new replies) 12/14/2014 on Money 0
User avatar #39 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
I wouldn't say that the Fed CAUSES inflation. yes, inflation can be caused by an excess of available currency (or in other words, the available money supply, which can be affected by both the Fed and the gov't), but the rate of production has a negligible effect on inflation relative to other things such as exchange rates, unemployment, cyclical patterns, and supply/demand shifts
User avatar #40 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
So you seem to know what's up, what is causing it then? You don't need to give me a thesis or anything, just chuck a couple points. It'll be the last thing I ask ya.
User avatar #42 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
pretty much the things I just mentioned in my last sentence.

wikipedia does a pretty decent job of covering the different theories
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inflation#Causes

but in case you're worried about it, there's no need to be. inflation isn't necessarily a bad thing (in fact a low and steady rate of inflation is preferred). it's only bad when inflation happens at a high rate in a short amount of time.
inflation-meh
hyperinflation-holyshitwe'rescrewed
User avatar #43 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
Not worried, just curious. I like to learn and like to be informed about what's going on and why, especially when the US is so close with Canada in terms of relations. Thanks man, have a good night.
User avatar #44 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
if you're in college, I would definitely suggest taking at least an intro macro-econ class.

it's interesting to learn that on a country-sized scale, money almost works the opposite of how you think it should.

for example, debt=good
if you don't have debt, it means no one trusts you enough to let you borrow. ahem Greece
User avatar #45 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
Not in college yet, still want to learn though. But how does that make sense? I know that a country is supposed to function while in debt (not how or why mind you, but I just know it's supposed to and that the US has gone off the deep end in that regard), but how does that translate into a trust issue?
User avatar #47 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
person A needs x money, so person B lends them x money

after y amount of time, A pays B x money + q money to pay for the opportunity cost of B not having x money for y amount of time

if B says "no, I'm not lending you x money," then there are three reasons:
1.)he doesn't have x money
2.)he can't afford the opportunity cost of not having x money for y amount of time
3.) he doesn't trust A to repay x+q money

for a country, 1 and 2 don't make sense. the countries made up the money in the first place, so for them, it's not real, tangible stuff. They definitely have x money, and they don't have any problems with parting with it for y amount of time.
plus, the country WANTS to lend the money, because it means long-term profit for them, so regardless of whether or not they like each other, it's in their financial interest to do the transaction. so the only reason why they wouldn't borrow the money is if they didn't trust the country to repay them.
debt can (in a round-about way) be correlated with trustworthiness.
#30 - But wouldn't they be able to put a cap on the printing of mone…  [+] (1 new reply) 12/14/2014 on Money +1
#41 - anonymous (12/14/2014) [-]
you share the point of view as president Jackson, either way most of what the fed prints is replacement cash for old or damaged bills, beyond that the fed keeps the economy at a slow rate of inflation depending on economic climate in an attempt to encourage spending in hopes that it will increase the strength of the U.S. ecnonomy. that being said the U.S. government is the one in debt due to uncontrolled spending, and how the government spends money is not the business of the fed. also having a currency that is not controlled by the U.S. government was supposed to mean that the government could not simply print as much of it as they like to cover debts and ruin the currency, they were hoping to avoid incidents like post WW1 Germany where the government prints as much money as it can to cover war debts and leaving the citizens basically broke as a nation.
#26 - Why?  [+] (12 new replies) 12/14/2014 on Money 0
User avatar #34 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
well, first, think about what the Fed does.
1.) it regulates the money supply through three methods (I can explain those if you need me to, but they aren't important)
2.) it maintains financial stability
3.) provides financial services to other banks, such as facilitating exchanges

keeping the Fed separate from the Gov't provides a separation from political bias and banking needs.

more importantly, because the Fed is independent from the gov't, its directors are long-term which allows for them to make long-term decisions. political cycles are too short for long-term planning to be useful (such as inflation and economic growth), so keeping it separate prevents political bias from interfering with fiscal planning

note that congress can also affect the money supply, but it almost never does. congress takes too long to actually get anything done, so it just lets the Fed take care of it
User avatar #37 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
I'm no economist, but that seems to make enough sense. The main part of that that worried me is the idea of the people not having control over their own money, since it's technically a private company/sector. So as long as congress can step in if the people push enough, then all is well. I thought the fed had a major hand in the cause of inflation as well though? As it's printing money like candy.
User avatar #39 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
I wouldn't say that the Fed CAUSES inflation. yes, inflation can be caused by an excess of available currency (or in other words, the available money supply, which can be affected by both the Fed and the gov't), but the rate of production has a negligible effect on inflation relative to other things such as exchange rates, unemployment, cyclical patterns, and supply/demand shifts
User avatar #40 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
So you seem to know what's up, what is causing it then? You don't need to give me a thesis or anything, just chuck a couple points. It'll be the last thing I ask ya.
User avatar #42 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
pretty much the things I just mentioned in my last sentence.

wikipedia does a pretty decent job of covering the different theories
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inflation#Causes

but in case you're worried about it, there's no need to be. inflation isn't necessarily a bad thing (in fact a low and steady rate of inflation is preferred). it's only bad when inflation happens at a high rate in a short amount of time.
inflation-meh
hyperinflation-holyshitwe'rescrewed
User avatar #43 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
Not worried, just curious. I like to learn and like to be informed about what's going on and why, especially when the US is so close with Canada in terms of relations. Thanks man, have a good night.
User avatar #44 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
if you're in college, I would definitely suggest taking at least an intro macro-econ class.

it's interesting to learn that on a country-sized scale, money almost works the opposite of how you think it should.

for example, debt=good
if you don't have debt, it means no one trusts you enough to let you borrow. ahem Greece
User avatar #45 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
Not in college yet, still want to learn though. But how does that make sense? I know that a country is supposed to function while in debt (not how or why mind you, but I just know it's supposed to and that the US has gone off the deep end in that regard), but how does that translate into a trust issue?
User avatar #47 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
person A needs x money, so person B lends them x money

after y amount of time, A pays B x money + q money to pay for the opportunity cost of B not having x money for y amount of time

if B says "no, I'm not lending you x money," then there are three reasons:
1.)he doesn't have x money
2.)he can't afford the opportunity cost of not having x money for y amount of time
3.) he doesn't trust A to repay x+q money

for a country, 1 and 2 don't make sense. the countries made up the money in the first place, so for them, it's not real, tangible stuff. They definitely have x money, and they don't have any problems with parting with it for y amount of time.
plus, the country WANTS to lend the money, because it means long-term profit for them, so regardless of whether or not they like each other, it's in their financial interest to do the transaction. so the only reason why they wouldn't borrow the money is if they didn't trust the country to repay them.
debt can (in a round-about way) be correlated with trustworthiness.
#28 - anonymous (12/14/2014) [-]
have you seen the way the U.S. spends money? it's like a crack adict at this point...
*sniff* "hey... uuuuuh China, you got any more cash i can uhh..... borrow?"
User avatar #30 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
But wouldn't they be able to put a cap on the printing of money if it was government controlled? Assuming people would be bothered to do that. Sure they might spend money like hell, but calming the printing process down may help with inflation.
#41 - anonymous (12/14/2014) [-]
you share the point of view as president Jackson, either way most of what the fed prints is replacement cash for old or damaged bills, beyond that the fed keeps the economy at a slow rate of inflation depending on economic climate in an attempt to encourage spending in hopes that it will increase the strength of the U.S. ecnonomy. that being said the U.S. government is the one in debt due to uncontrolled spending, and how the government spends money is not the business of the fed. also having a currency that is not controlled by the U.S. government was supposed to mean that the government could not simply print as much of it as they like to cover debts and ruin the currency, they were hoping to avoid incidents like post WW1 Germany where the government prints as much money as it can to cover war debts and leaving the citizens basically broke as a nation.
#20 - Speaking of which, why haven't you guys fixed that? It seems l…  [+] (14 new replies) 12/14/2014 on Money +6
User avatar #25 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
no, making the Fed part of the government would be a bad idea.
User avatar #26 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
Why?
User avatar #34 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
well, first, think about what the Fed does.
1.) it regulates the money supply through three methods (I can explain those if you need me to, but they aren't important)
2.) it maintains financial stability
3.) provides financial services to other banks, such as facilitating exchanges

keeping the Fed separate from the Gov't provides a separation from political bias and banking needs.

more importantly, because the Fed is independent from the gov't, its directors are long-term which allows for them to make long-term decisions. political cycles are too short for long-term planning to be useful (such as inflation and economic growth), so keeping it separate prevents political bias from interfering with fiscal planning

note that congress can also affect the money supply, but it almost never does. congress takes too long to actually get anything done, so it just lets the Fed take care of it
User avatar #37 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
I'm no economist, but that seems to make enough sense. The main part of that that worried me is the idea of the people not having control over their own money, since it's technically a private company/sector. So as long as congress can step in if the people push enough, then all is well. I thought the fed had a major hand in the cause of inflation as well though? As it's printing money like candy.
User avatar #39 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
I wouldn't say that the Fed CAUSES inflation. yes, inflation can be caused by an excess of available currency (or in other words, the available money supply, which can be affected by both the Fed and the gov't), but the rate of production has a negligible effect on inflation relative to other things such as exchange rates, unemployment, cyclical patterns, and supply/demand shifts
User avatar #40 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
So you seem to know what's up, what is causing it then? You don't need to give me a thesis or anything, just chuck a couple points. It'll be the last thing I ask ya.
User avatar #42 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
pretty much the things I just mentioned in my last sentence.

wikipedia does a pretty decent job of covering the different theories
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inflation#Causes

but in case you're worried about it, there's no need to be. inflation isn't necessarily a bad thing (in fact a low and steady rate of inflation is preferred). it's only bad when inflation happens at a high rate in a short amount of time.
inflation-meh
hyperinflation-holyshitwe'rescrewed
User avatar #43 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
Not worried, just curious. I like to learn and like to be informed about what's going on and why, especially when the US is so close with Canada in terms of relations. Thanks man, have a good night.
User avatar #44 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
if you're in college, I would definitely suggest taking at least an intro macro-econ class.

it's interesting to learn that on a country-sized scale, money almost works the opposite of how you think it should.

for example, debt=good
if you don't have debt, it means no one trusts you enough to let you borrow. ahem Greece
User avatar #45 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
Not in college yet, still want to learn though. But how does that make sense? I know that a country is supposed to function while in debt (not how or why mind you, but I just know it's supposed to and that the US has gone off the deep end in that regard), but how does that translate into a trust issue?
User avatar #47 - coolcalx (12/14/2014) [-]
person A needs x money, so person B lends them x money

after y amount of time, A pays B x money + q money to pay for the opportunity cost of B not having x money for y amount of time

if B says "no, I'm not lending you x money," then there are three reasons:
1.)he doesn't have x money
2.)he can't afford the opportunity cost of not having x money for y amount of time
3.) he doesn't trust A to repay x+q money

for a country, 1 and 2 don't make sense. the countries made up the money in the first place, so for them, it's not real, tangible stuff. They definitely have x money, and they don't have any problems with parting with it for y amount of time.
plus, the country WANTS to lend the money, because it means long-term profit for them, so regardless of whether or not they like each other, it's in their financial interest to do the transaction. so the only reason why they wouldn't borrow the money is if they didn't trust the country to repay them.
debt can (in a round-about way) be correlated with trustworthiness.
#28 - anonymous (12/14/2014) [-]
have you seen the way the U.S. spends money? it's like a crack adict at this point...
*sniff* "hey... uuuuuh China, you got any more cash i can uhh..... borrow?"
User avatar #30 - carlonord (12/14/2014) [-]
But wouldn't they be able to put a cap on the printing of money if it was government controlled? Assuming people would be bothered to do that. Sure they might spend money like hell, but calming the printing process down may help with inflation.
#41 - anonymous (12/14/2014) [-]
you share the point of view as president Jackson, either way most of what the fed prints is replacement cash for old or damaged bills, beyond that the fed keeps the economy at a slow rate of inflation depending on economic climate in an attempt to encourage spending in hopes that it will increase the strength of the U.S. ecnonomy. that being said the U.S. government is the one in debt due to uncontrolled spending, and how the government spends money is not the business of the fed. also having a currency that is not controlled by the U.S. government was supposed to mean that the government could not simply print as much of it as they like to cover debts and ruin the currency, they were hoping to avoid incidents like post WW1 Germany where the government prints as much money as it can to cover war debts and leaving the citizens basically broke as a nation.
#31 - I can handle the chimera, but this scene and Hughes death can … 12/14/2014 on Difficulty level: extreme +6
#7 - Picture 12/14/2014 on Le Grand Hat 0
#51 - The cop in that video, are you ******* joking? Th… 12/13/2014 on Never thought I'd see the... 0
#27 - While I support doing something to screw with the SJWs, I'm no… 12/13/2014 on The people have spoken. 0
#30 - ... The kid's picture is white, are you seriously bringing race here?  [+] (1 new reply) 12/13/2014 on Tyler dooham!! +4
User avatar #81 - chuca (12/13/2014) [-]
anything to justify his hatred for blacks, that's what happens when you've sucked too many pimps off so you don't get beat not even quite sure what i'm going for here besides he sucks cock
#17 - It's that time of year already? 12/12/2014 on It begins in a week. +1
#111 - It's so nice to hear that I'm not the only one that believe in… 12/12/2014 on Anon doesn't want a daughter +3
#38 - Heard you was talkin **** .  [+] (1 new reply) 12/12/2014 on Panzerkampfwagen Schadenfreude +2
#40 - wazoowonseventeen (12/12/2014) [-]
Maus sez hallo
#35 - Guns don't need air to work, they provide their own oxidizer. 12/12/2014 on Panzerkampfwagen Schadenfreude +1
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#44 - mcburd ONLINE (01/07/2015) [+] (4 replies)
stickied by carlonord
#29 - therealsuperderpy ONLINE (08/09/2014) [-]
stickied by carlonord
User avatar #42 - gugek (01/03/2015) [-]
Have a great day homie your the best
User avatar #40 - pumkinz (11/11/2014) [-]
Why havent you opened that chest?
User avatar #41 to #40 - carlonord (11/11/2014) [-]
Because I literally do not give a **** , and rarely even look at my profile.
User avatar #39 - energyman (09/07/2014) [-]
You're kinda gay
User avatar #38 - jeffthellamaking (09/03/2014) [-]
Apparently, you're gay.
[Tardiness Intensifies]
User avatar #36 - goobyman ONLINE (08/11/2014) [-]
did you know that therealsuperderpy is ******* gay as hell?
User avatar #35 - NutHut ONLINE (08/10/2014) [-]
y r u so gay
User avatar #33 - peanutsaurusrex (08/10/2014) [-]
ur gay
User avatar #31 - aczzoh ONLINE (08/09/2014) [-]
u r gay
User avatar #30 - walcorn (08/09/2014) [-]
ur gay
User avatar #28 - Sunset (08/09/2014) [-]
you're gay
User avatar #27 - josa (08/09/2014) [-]
therealsuperderpy told me to say that you're gay.
User avatar #24 - butteryweiner (10/23/2013) [-]
How did i know your PP was jon tron.
I AIIIIIIIIIIIINT HAVVING THAT ****
#23 - therealsuperderpy ONLINE (10/07/2013) [-]
******* vore loving faggot kill yourself.
I love you.
#15 - therealsuperderpy has deleted their comment [-]
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