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Capnhowdy

Last status update:
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Gender: male
Date Signed Up:8/21/2010
Last Login:7/24/2016
FunnyJunk Career Stats
Content Thumbs: 211 total,  242 ,  31
Comment Thumbs: 575 total,  657 ,  82
Content Level Progress: 40% (4/10)
Level 19 Content: New Here → Level 20 Content: Peasant
Comment Level Progress: 60% (6/10)
Level 154 Comments: Faptastic → Level 155 Comments: Faptastic
Subscribers:1
Content Views:28106
Times Content Favorited:29 times
Total Comments Made:363
FJ Points:756

latest user's comments

#21 - I would bet my last dollar that the "petition to repeal t…  [+] (1 new reply) 12/21/2015 on yale students against the... 0
#49 - anon (12/21/2015) [-]
Doesn't matter if it was sold to them as anything. It is their responsibility as a American to know what the 1st Amendment is. It would be like voting for a President and not even bothering to read their candidacy platform. Kinda how Obama got in.
#97 - there is 1/10th the oxygen per volume in water as there is in … 06/26/2015 on Exciting 0
#96 - Comment deleted 06/26/2015 on Exciting 0
#95 - Comment deleted  [+] (1 new reply) 06/26/2015 on Exciting 0
#96 - Capnhowdy has deleted their comment.
#86 - there is 1/10th the oxygen per volume in water as there is in … 06/26/2015 on Exciting 0
#84 - electrolysis provides the same oxygen mass per joule of energy…  [+] (4 new replies) 06/26/2015 on Exciting 0
User avatar
#87 - armwulf (06/26/2015) [-]
Wait, hold the fuck up, I call bullshit.
I get it, you can calculate the amount of energy required for an electrolysis rig to generate X amount of oxygen, depending upon it's efficiency. That's simple.

But there are too many unknown quantities for you to make that assertion for a pump-gill system!
-The level of dissolved oxygen in the water (Varies based on depth, geography, latitude, temperature, salinity, and other factors)
-The efficiency of the gill (What percentage of dissolved oxygen is removed from water passing through)
-The resistance of the gill (The amount of force required to move water through the gill. More resistance requires a larger pump.)

Meanwhile, an Electrolysis rig separates water into Hydrogen and Oxygen, it's separating molecules, which is a bit different from extracting a dissolved gas from a solution!
#97 - Capnhowdy (06/26/2015) [-]
there is 1/10th the oxygen per volume in water as there is in air, best case scenario:

water.usgs.gov/edu/dissolvedoxygen.html

that means a bare minimum of 10 times the flow rate of normal breathing and of a fluid 680 times denser than air. Also, at 300kJ/mol to electrolyze water, you need about 3.5kW to produce 200g/min of O2 which is what you'd get from 300L/min of fresh water. way too much for a human but oddly pretty close to what industrial pumps consume at those volumes.

Engineeeeeeeeer
#95 - Capnhowdy has deleted their comment.
#96 - Capnhowdy has deleted their comment.
#82 - most water still doesnt have enough oxygen in it to support a …  [+] (6 new replies) 06/26/2015 on Exciting 0
User avatar
#83 - armwulf (06/26/2015) [-]
Electrolysis requires heavy, high energy equipment.
A pump requires a motor to spin a little turbine and suck in water.
#84 - Capnhowdy (06/26/2015) [-]
electrolysis provides the same oxygen mass per joule of energy consumed as a pump but has the benefit of no moving parts and no, it doesnt need to be very big at all. they are both silly ideas though because you need absurd amounts of stored energy. trust me, im literally an electrical engineer. invest in a SCUBA
User avatar
#87 - armwulf (06/26/2015) [-]
Wait, hold the fuck up, I call bullshit.
I get it, you can calculate the amount of energy required for an electrolysis rig to generate X amount of oxygen, depending upon it's efficiency. That's simple.

But there are too many unknown quantities for you to make that assertion for a pump-gill system!
-The level of dissolved oxygen in the water (Varies based on depth, geography, latitude, temperature, salinity, and other factors)
-The efficiency of the gill (What percentage of dissolved oxygen is removed from water passing through)
-The resistance of the gill (The amount of force required to move water through the gill. More resistance requires a larger pump.)

Meanwhile, an Electrolysis rig separates water into Hydrogen and Oxygen, it's separating molecules, which is a bit different from extracting a dissolved gas from a solution!
#97 - Capnhowdy (06/26/2015) [-]
there is 1/10th the oxygen per volume in water as there is in air, best case scenario:

water.usgs.gov/edu/dissolvedoxygen.html

that means a bare minimum of 10 times the flow rate of normal breathing and of a fluid 680 times denser than air. Also, at 300kJ/mol to electrolyze water, you need about 3.5kW to produce 200g/min of O2 which is what you'd get from 300L/min of fresh water. way too much for a human but oddly pretty close to what industrial pumps consume at those volumes.

Engineeeeeeeeer
#95 - Capnhowdy has deleted their comment.
#96 - Capnhowdy has deleted their comment.
#91 - weight is a force. force is mass times acceleration. F=MA. on …  [+] (1 new reply) 05/23/2015 on 1kg of steel VS 1kg of... 0
User avatar
#93 - kerfufflemachtwo (05/23/2015) [-]
Okay, yeah. My brain hasn't had to do science stuff in a while.

So, in the same gravitational field, two 1 kg objects would weigh the same. In different fields, they would weigh differently, but still have a mass of 1 kg.

So, send the feathers to Jupiter and they will weigh more than the steel.
#89 - if theyre on the same planet together they weigh the same too.…  [+] (3 new replies) 05/23/2015 on 1kg of steel VS 1kg of... 0
User avatar
#90 - kerfufflemachtwo (05/23/2015) [-]
I thought that only applied to Earth. That the weight would change elsewhere, even if the mass was the same. In theory, at least.

Gonna have to look into this more, because it will bother me until I know.
#91 - Capnhowdy (05/23/2015) [-]
weight is a force. force is mass times acceleration. F=MA. on the same planet, the A will be equal. if they are both 1kg (mass) then the weight is the same too. on a different planet A is different from earth but not between the two objects sitting next to each other
User avatar
#93 - kerfufflemachtwo (05/23/2015) [-]
Okay, yeah. My brain hasn't had to do science stuff in a while.

So, in the same gravitational field, two 1 kg objects would weigh the same. In different fields, they would weigh differently, but still have a mass of 1 kg.

So, send the feathers to Jupiter and they will weigh more than the steel.
#55 - In all seriousness, those were some of the most tasteful credi… 04/12/2015 on Anime 404 (please use... +1
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