(untitled). . ill {cu please start retaking these with phillips screws?? screwdriver slips?. If you're tinkering with an electrical outlet without cutting the power first, then it's natural selection at work. (untitled) ill {cu please start retaking these with phillips screws?? screwdriver slips? If you're tinkering an electrical outlet without cutting the power first then it's natural selection at work
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> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
User avatar #1 - DeathOne
Reply +111 123456789123345869
(07/02/2014) [-]
If you're tinkering with an electrical outlet without cutting the power first, then it's natural selection at work.
#2 to #1 - Hightower
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(07/02/2014) [-]
It's only dangerous if you're retarded.
#14 to #2 - anon id: 94c58628
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Implying accident never happen?
#16 to #14 - anon id: 014700d8
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Implying that you would need to get a screwdriver stuck in both the vertical holes while touching the metal to get shocked. Generally, not a thing that happens.
#18 to #16 - anon id: ab235f89
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
You know nothing about electricity at all...
User avatar #30 to #1 - ilovedickbuttxd
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Wouldn't it make more sense to have a safer screw holding the outlet, than having to turn off *all* of the electricity just to change /fix /check the outlet?

Sounds like a waste of time.
User avatar #33 to #30 - DeathOne
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
You don't have to turn off all the electricity, just the room you're working in. You really can't afford to take any risks when working with electricity, we can all agree on that. Besides, it's not like you have to work on electrical outlets and switches in your house on a daily basis, it's been years until we had to change a faulty switch over here.
#74 to #1 - anon id: b72d76bc
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
dont touch the ******* metal on your screwdriver then.
You learn that after getting shocked a few times.

Source: I'm a electrician. I've gotten shocked 3-4 times the last 2 years (once beacuse i'm stupid, twice beacuse of faulty wires ETC, and once more because I was inexperienced and was working alone
#75 to #74 - catzor
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Aaaaand forgot to log in.
#4 to #1 - taurusguy
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(07/02/2014) [-]
You obviously arent an electrician, sure its dangerous, but its ******* fun aswell.
User avatar #27 to #1 - psykobear
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Cutting the power... just to, say, put up a multi-outlet, or change a bad plate. It takes 20 seconds.
User avatar #7 - pawnman
Reply +50 123456789123345869
(07/02/2014) [-]
Actual trained electrician here: I thought this post was about stabbing yourself in the hand(Which it happens a ******* ton with flat heads). Then i saw comments.

You won't die. Also you won't get shocked unless you touch both the HOT(Small slit) and the GROUND(half circle) or the HOT and NEUTRAL(big slit). If the screwdriver goes in any of the holes by itself, nothing will happen. I have installed countless Receptacles while the power is on. It isn't a big deal at all.

Even if you go get shocked with a basic 20A circuit in a house, it will scare you more than hurt you.
#8 to #7 - theycallmedingus
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/02/2014) [-]
Someone should try this out.
(In a live stream)
User avatar #46 to #8 - zomaru
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Sounds like a job for Peanutbutter
#13 to #7 - anon id: ef5bf855
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
20A is standard? I thought 15 was standard and 20 was higher.
User avatar #65 to #13 - pawnman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
15A is being phased out, it is only acceptable in some places as a lighting circuit. Most if not all modern homes now should run 20A circuits.
User avatar #17 to #7 - alphabetagama
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
What do you need to do in order to learn and get credited as trained electrician?
#23 to #7 - gokusdog
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Why is it then when I was a kid I put a paperclip inside of one of the small slitted ones and I got shocked?
User avatar #26 to #23 - dammriver
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Because you act as a ground as long as you're not standing on an insulated surface (fiberglass ladder, wood, thick plastic, glass, etc.).
User avatar #51 to #7 - zallaz
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
My grandpa died from an electric shock from a socket.
#53 to #51 - anon id: 7b4e9f08
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Cause he was old!
User avatar #61 to #7 - davidiskickin
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
former electrician here, people need to get educated
User avatar #64 to #7 - pawnman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
I didn't word the second paragraph right. When i said Ground to HOT i meant being grounded what so ever and the half circle on the receptacle. Just don't work in your bare feet.
#73 to #7 - anon id: 160fd34e
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
not to mention the base of your screw driver is insulated

dont have to be an electrician to understand electricity

you CAN get electrocuted if another part of your body happens to be touching a ground point and you happen to be touching the non insulated part of the screw driver... but the odds of that happening in a residential house are slim to none...maybe on a construction site
User avatar #11 to #7 - jdogtwoptzero
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
I disagree with the former part of your argument. All it takes for you to be shocked is for you to be grounded, and touching the hot. I am not an electrician, but I have replaced outlets before, and just having my feet on the floor and touching the live wire was enough to shock me. I agree with the whole scaring you, not killing you part though. Nothing quite wakes you up like 110v in the morning.
User avatar #63 to #11 - pawnman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
yes, I agree i didn't word that right in the beginning. I just never work grounded. I always work in my boots and never get grounded while working on a circuit.
#19 to #11 - anon id: ab235f89
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Thank you kind sir... please give this man some well deserved thumbs... your answer is brilliant!
User avatar #25 to #7 - dammriver
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Lol, are you trolling? I hope you are...

You WILL get shocked, as long as you are grounded. I'm not talking your average hardwood floors, I'm talking cement floors, outdoor receptacles, and anything that isn't rated at least somewhat as an "insulator". I don't know if you're licensed or an apprentice, but yanno..

Also, the voltage doesn't matter; it's the amperage that kills you. Granted, your chances of survival vary, you definitely could die from a standard 20A receptacle.

Hell, 100 milliamps (0.1 A) can kill you..
User avatar #59 to #25 - pawnman
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Well i hope you aren't barefoot on cement. I'm never grounded. the only time i am shocked is if i grab hot and neutral on either side of the outlet when i am screwing on the wires. All it does is give me a tingling sensation. And i said 20A circuit not 20V
User avatar #79 to #59 - dammriver
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Don't talk to me like I'm stupid, because if you didn't notice, I said 20A too.

You don't have to be barefoot, but as long as you are touching the ground, you're grounded. Depending on how thick the rubber is on your boots or shoes can change that, but it usually doesn't (unless that's what they're rated for).

So, when you kneel down to get to that receptacle (if you're an electrician, it should be off anyway), your knee is only protected by the thin layer of your pants, which isn't really much at all.

Unless you're installing doorbells or emergency lighting on a low voltage circuit, it should do more than just tingle.
User avatar #91 to #79 - pawnman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/05/2014) [-]
I am not talking to you like you are stupid. It just takes more than just touching the ground to be grounded. If everything touching the ground was grounded there would be no need for ground rods. I can kneel on cement in a basement and hold a single hot wire and not feel a thing.

I am talking from experience not research.
User avatar #92 to #91 - dammriver
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/05/2014) [-]
Electricity takes the path with the least resistance, hence why we use copper in the field. It's cheap and has little resistance -less than steel- so it grounds out boxes, devices, etc. That's why we use grounding rods, GFCI receptacles, and all sorts of protection. Also, grounded literally means grounded. That's exactly why the ground rod goes into the ground.

By holding the wire, you're talking about the copper, right? If you hold the insulation, of course you won't feel a thing. Holding the copper on a live wire that is hot most definitely should shock you.
User avatar #93 to #92 - pawnman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/05/2014) [-]
I have held live hot wire, the bare copper while kneeling on a cement floor in a normal 20A 120V circuit. It did not have enough current to be pushed through my body and into the ground since the cement itself was not a good conductor for electricity.
User avatar #94 to #93 - dammriver
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/05/2014) [-]
Cement was more figurative, but it acts as a [better] conductor when damp.
But, lets go to the second thing I said-outdoor receptacles.

Plus, the voltage would be what would push it through.
#95 to #94 - pawnman
0 123456789123345869
has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #96 to #95 - dammriver
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/05/2014) [-]
Current is amps. Amps are pushed through the wires by voltage.

The way you say this makes me feel like you intentionally try to shock yourself.

I JUST completed four years of training in the electrical field, both classroom work and field work. I also just received my OSHA 30..
User avatar #97 to #96 - pawnman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/05/2014) [-]
Congrats. Have you never gone through your whole electrical career and have not tried to shock yourself? It's natural curiosity. I have 4 years of college and am in the middle of building a power plant. In my Vo-tech highschool me and all of my class would try to see who could hold onto the neutral and hot the longest in one hand. I didn't win but hell it didn't kill any of us. Just felt weird as ****. We were dumb 16-18 year old kids, ***** what you do when your young. We experimented all the time with it. we had 5 of us grab hands and both ends had the hot and neutral but it didn't go through. Humans are week insulators but good enough to handle small circuits.

And it doesn't come down to what should happen. it's what does happen.
User avatar #99 to #97 - dammriver
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/05/2014) [-]
Well yeah, that wouldn't kill you. If both the hot and neutral were in your hand, it shouldn't kill you since it's only traveling through your hand.

Also, no, I haven't tried it.
User avatar #100 to #99 - pawnman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/05/2014) [-]
I have also had it in either hand. Didn't kill me. I have had 280 go through my chest, felt like someone punched me. But i didn't die.
You keep saying should. It doesn't matter how many things you know or research. Just because things should happen because that's the way you learned it, doesn't mean it's the way it will happen.
User avatar #98 to #97 - pawnman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/05/2014) [-]
weak*
User avatar #29 to #25 - forbesydemon
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
He's probably saying this assuming that no-one is stupid enough to deal with anything electronic whilst grounded/without insulated shoes etc. But I know tons of people who have legitimately no clue how electricity works and would happily do wiring in bare feet without killing the power first.
User avatar #35 to #25 - zomaru
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
I stuck my finger in a light socket twice in the same day when I was like 5 and was just fine.
#39 to #35 - gaffateip
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
You may still die from that.
Was your fingers stuck in the socket for a few seconds, or did you pull them out immediately?

You can rule out disrupted heartbeat cause it's so long ago, but electrical burn may still be a problem.

It's been almost a year since my last FSE course, and I remember something like cooking your flesh if you are stuck to the power source for a few seconds.

Cooking your hand isn't fatal because it's cooked, it's fatal because it releases a protein into your blood stream that's toxic to your kidney cells.

Here is something I found on the web after a quick search:
The injured muscle cell leaks myoglobin (a protein) into the blood stream. Myoglobin can be directly toxic to kidney cells, and it can impair and clog the filtration system of the kidney. Both mechanisms can lead to kidney failure

TL;DR : Respect electricity, if can and will kill you.

User avatar #40 to #39 - zomaru
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
But, sometimes getting a little electric shock can feel good, explain that.
#41 to #40 - gaffateip
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Beware Gore
User avatar #42 to #41 - zomaru
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
ISnt that the difference between Amps and Volts
User avatar #45 to #42 - gaffateip
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Well, yeah. Volts feel good, amps don't.

But put your fingers in a light socket and you will feel amps and volts
User avatar #78 to #45 - dammriver
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Lol, volts feel good to a point. TASER systems use volts
User avatar #15 - phoenix grinder
Reply -4 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
damn Yankees

phillips head screws should be illegal
User avatar #43 to #15 - potrsr
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Eurofag here. Why are you calling it philips screw or roberstons as one reply said?
User avatar #83 to #43 - phoenix grinder
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
the one pictured is a slot head. next to useless. phillips head is the 'plus sign' that is impossible to use even sober. robertson is the square head one where you can stop screwing and lean on it and it won't fall out
#70 to #43 - schmidtycent
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
That's...just what they're called I suppose
#22 to #15 - TidusSloan
Reply +6 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Robertson screws forever!
User avatar #24 to #22 - phoenix grinder
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
you sound Canadian. good show
#77 to #22 - stealingbikes
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Those are worse than Phillips after exposure to the elements

Torx master race
User avatar #84 to #77 - TidusSloan
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
actually they are the easiest to use after exposure to the elements.
User avatar #85 to #84 - stealingbikes
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Ever repaired a deck built with them? They're awful. Phillips sucked too but took less work to extract.

Torx is by far the best. More than worth the added cost.
User avatar #89 to #85 - TidusSloan
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/04/2014) [-]
Actually im a carpenter by trade and i have repaired many decks sir. And i know that no matter what kind of screw you use it can be retarded tricky pulling those suckers out, especially when the owner used latex paint, but i know and have also been taught in trade school that robertson screws are the screw heard to use as wood screws, they were designed to be that way, and are made that way. The only reason that phillips screws are more commonly used throughout the states is that the guy who invented them wouldnt license them to Henry Ford who wanted to use them in his model t cars because they would save him so much time and money.
User avatar #31 to #22 - talosknight
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
You beat me to this!
User avatar #28 to #15 - failtolawl
Reply +12 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
but Phillips heads have better traction.
#71 to #28 - schmidtycent
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Yeah, but ain't got **** on a Robertson. Americans too stubborn to use em, just because it's a Canadian design
User avatar #90 to #71 - failtolawl
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/04/2014) [-]
But Americans do use that design, for stainless steel connections.
#68 to #28 - SylverSlayer
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
why the **** don't people use robertsons
#47 to #28 - anon id: cd7098c0
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Currently studying Marine Engineering, and the engineers HATE phillips cause they can be rounded off >_<
#34 - zomaru
Reply +10 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
User avatar #52 - slovak
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
a good electrician turns the electricity OFF before working
User avatar #67 to #52 - preacherQ
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Yeah, but in my experience, 9/10 you take this cover off because you're painting or plastering. And for that you need light. Like, from power. They tell me you need to touch both slits to get a shock anyway, but I ain't gonna test that.
User avatar #82 to #52 - dammriver
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
EXACTLY!

Damn I hate people, but it's people like these that keep my career(s) going..
#36 - xcoreyx
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
I have never in my life seen a screwdriver without a handle made of some nonmetal material like plastic. I can't imagine how you would get shocked.
User avatar #37 to #36 - coolchalkyxxx
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Electricity does have a tendency to arc. Plus the insulation on screwdrivers aren't perfect. Not saying its likely gonna happen, but it can.
#57 to #37 - anon id: cfafac23
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
If this is in america then it won't arc for more than a millimeter or smth. 110V is not going to arc for ****.
#12 - tetedemetal
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Natural selection hard at work here
User avatar #58 - charagrin
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
If you are not smart enough to know you are supposed to pull the breaker before working on them, then you deserve to die regardless.
User avatar #62 to #58 - thegamerslife
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
you don't have to pull the breaker if you use the "lock out, tag out" way of doing things.
User avatar #81 to #62 - dammriver
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Lock out tag out goes on the breaker after you turn it off so nobody else touches it... You still have to turn it off...
User avatar #86 to #81 - thegamerslife
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
I've done single breaker lock out tag outs... honestly the thing you use could easily be broken off though... always made me worry.
User avatar #87 to #86 - dammriver
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
I know. It's more like a sign saying not to turn it on..
User avatar #88 to #87 - thegamerslife
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
when I was in job corp, we did work/training on industrial breakers. I like those, cause with some you have the little holes and can individually lock out the breakers.
User avatar #9 - namdelliks
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
Why the actual **** would you be holding the metal part to use a screwdriver? Are you that ******* retarded?
#48 - firesky
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
First: you have to hit both holes at once.

Second: if you use decent screwdrivers you are protected against a certain amount of power. Mine are tested for 1000V
User avatar #60 to #48 - huffe
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
oh yeah, i forgot outlets deliver DC
#54 to #48 - hondasupermoto
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/03/2014) [-]
no you godamn idiot with AC 110V or 240V you dont need to hit both holes.
if you hit the phase (unless your standing on a rubber mat or have decent tools) you will get shocked.