sorry I'm late, had to wash my hare. .. is that rabbit dead? godhatestags
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> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
#2 - shema
Reply +72 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
is that rabbit dead?
is that rabbit dead?
#56 to #2 - boomerpyro
Reply +6 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
pepsi.
pepsi.
#80 to #56 - kionz
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
isded
#73 to #56 - hokeymon
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
PEPSI MAN!!!
User avatar #3 to #2 - countrystrong
Reply +139 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
No, he just really enjoys his bath. You can see his mouth move at the beginning of the gif
User avatar #66 to #3 - maid
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Death Rattle.
User avatar #4 to #3 - shema
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
that's good.
#77 to #3 - fleszar
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
he's singing
#55 to #3 - anon id: eda3ee9c
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(04/10/2014) [-]
strings
#1 - psychadelicace
Reply +53 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
I like that pun, that is a nice pun
I like that pun, that is a nice pun
#24 to #1 - keybladewarrior
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Rush Hour is best hour.
Rush Hour is best hour.
#12 - felixjarl
Reply +36 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
Blood does not come off easily.
Blood does not come off easily.
User avatar #59 to #12 - levitatingscrotum
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Your comment deserves much more thumbs than you have right now.
#61 to #12 - jamesisnotreal
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
right, time to get this out then
#17 - avanger
Reply +23 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
Btw  as i know  when you do this to rabbits they become paralyzed for a short time...
Btw as i know when you do this to rabbits they become paralyzed for a short time...
User avatar #30 to #17 - mrmystery
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
My best friend was a vet nurse for a good few years. The most horrifying thing he ever told me ab out was when someone held a bunny like you'd cradle a baby. They kick. The kick is so powerful it snaps their fragile spine,and then they just ..... emit this .... HORRIFYING wail of AGONY ... and if you let them go, they try to eat their own legs.

They try to CHEW OFF their OWN. *******. LEGS.

Now, from a nature standpoint, they do this because the loss of sensation in their body region leads them to think a predator has them pinned. But STILL. HOLY ****.
User avatar #79 to #17 - sciencexplain
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Paralysis? That's nothing, mate. They can overstress in water so much that they have a spontaneous heart attack and just die. It's not nice at all.
User avatar #83 to #79 - adak
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Yes, if you do it to an adult rabbit that's never gotten a bath. But a rabbit that has gotten regular baths since it was small probably wouldn't be stressed. Same as cats. I have friends that has bathed their cats since they were kittens, and now they actually enjoy getting baths, but other cats from the same litter freak the **** out if they get even a drop of water on them. Now why the **** you would actually bother to give you cat a bath is a whole other line of questions.
User avatar #84 to #83 - sciencexplain
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Well, remember that cats and kittens are different to rabbits. Also, the simple act of submerging them into cold or hot water suddenly can still surprise them. Allowing them to introduce themselves to it can reduce the stress and get them used to it, but you are right in saying that induction nullifies their response.
User avatar #88 to #84 - adak
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(04/10/2014) [-]
Sure they're different but conditioning works in similar ways in most mammals. I was at a seminar about classical conditioning just a couple of days ago. It's main focus was the coupling of the simple blink reflex to a tone of a certain pitch They took a volounteer and using a special type of goggles they shot small puffs of air into his eyes, strong enough to trigger a blink reflex, at regular intervals, while at the same time they briefly played a note of a certain pitch(2000 hz). After about 30 trials they stopped the puffs of air, and the tone alone would trigger the blink reflex. but we also discussed more complicated responses.

Just like you can condition a fear-response to a harmless stimuli I recommend checking out the Little Albert experiment. They let a 8 month baby play with a white rat, but whenever he reached out to touch it they struck a metal rod with a hammer, which would scare Albert and he would start crying. After a couple of trials with this he would get very distressed and scared just by seeing the white rat. He showed the same response to many other things that had similar characteristics like a rabbit, cottonballs etc, which is coupled with stimulus generalisation(and the fact that he responed to so many different stimuli is probably due to his young age). you can often remove them by exposure therapy. But even after you've successfully treated a phobia you can still get a fear-response from the same stimuli in a different context, or a similar stimuli, which is called stimulus discrimination. They showed a good example of that during the seminar I attended. The volounteer would blink every time they played the 2000 hz tone, as well as tones with a pitch close to that (I think the interval was like 1000-6000 hz or something). But if they played a 500 hz tone it wouldn't trigger the blinking. Suddenly submerging an animal is a very different type of stimulus compared to just giving them a bath.
User avatar #92 to #88 - sciencexplain
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
I think maybe a lot of that which you have written is a bit excessive and unneeded for your point. It's not the act of giving a bath but the initial submersion of the animal into water. Consider it as the 'Boiling Frog' experiment (Which I actually disproved using previous works). Basically, sudden submersion for any animal causes rapid reflex response, but putting them in without the water and allowing them to adjust in their own form makes it much easier. Drop a cat in freezing/boiling water, it freaks out and reacts. The same will happen with rabbits.

It's just that cats are a poor comparison, because they become hostile when reflex actions are triggered, but rabbits don't tend to behave the same way.
User avatar #93 to #92 - adak
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Fair enough, I sort of drifted away from my point. What I was getting at was that I don't think a sudden submersion Just for clarification, how sudden are we actually talking here? and what would normally happen during a bath is comparable. They are vastly different kinds of stimuli and therefore any prior conditioning wouldn't work which is why i brought up discrimination . Same with extreme temperatures. And it's also very different scenarios. If your animal is used to bathing you should be able to put them straight into water, as long as you do it slowly, since they would most likely relate it to prior conditioning which is why I brought up generelisation . But still, you have a fair point in that I got a little carried away. And I'm not really sure what triggered me to write such a long response to begin with.

And while cats and rabbits have different reflex actions in many contexts, surely both of them would respond with some kind of flight-reflex when dropped in very cold/hot water?

Just curious, what's your profession? I've gathered that it's something in the field of science but that is a pretty broad group

User avatar #94 to #93 - sciencexplain
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(04/10/2014) [-]
Forensic Sciences. Biology and reflexes/nerves and stuff sometimes fall under my category, but not that often.

And all animals have some sort of flight reflex depending on their intellectual standpoint. Both rabbits AND cats definitely are capable of having it.
User avatar #95 to #94 - adak
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(04/10/2014) [-]
Cool stuff! More in a general field or specialized? Can't say I've got a very good grip on what subdivisions there are, but it covers quite a broad range of subjects right? I've had some contact with pathology through school, not so much the forensic side of it though, it seems very interesting.

I'm currently studying neurology, but we've not gotten that deep into the more complex functions yet. It's an interesting subject though. Feels like the deeper you get into it the more you understand, but you also realize how little we actually know.

God that last line sounds pretentious.
User avatar #96 to #95 - sciencexplain
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
My specialty field of Forensics is ballistics and gun/bullet behaviour. I also study poisonous chemicals, secretive ingestion and slight criminology alongside criminal techniques. I'm like Dexter, but I don't trial my theories on people.
User avatar #90 to #88 - adak
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(04/10/2014) [-]
****, I sort of messed up one of the sentences towards the end. Just to clarify: reacting to similar stimuli without it being conditioned is stimulus generalisation and being able to discern between different stimuli with some similarities is stimulus discrimination.

User avatar #46 to #17 - sinonyx
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Bunny takes a shower  [ORIGINAL VIDEO]

it rolls over... pretty sure it's not paralyzed
User avatar #78 to #46 - adak
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Jesus christ, the comments on that one.

I don't get how you can go on about rabbits being paralyzed and completely unable to move when on their backs in the comments of a video where a rabbit rolls over without any apparent problem as soon as it gets annoyed. Searched around for any good source that this was dangerous, and the only thing I found outside of forum posts and yahoo answers was the thing mrmystery mentioned You have to make sure it doesn't kick if it gets stressed out , which wouldn't happen if the rabbit was relaxed and used to lying on it's back. I will admit that I couldn't be bothered to do any extensive searching, so if anyone has a good source on this feel free to correct me.
User avatar #81 to #78 - mrmystery
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
I'm not BSing with you, man. My friend Tim saw another Vet Tech hold a rabbit like this before getting its claws or teeth filed, can't remember which. But It kicked , and that whole spine snap thing happened. The reason He told me about it was because he came into my studio one day and just said

"So a routine nail trimming for a little girls bunny rabbit became a forced emergency euthanasia" And the story went on from there. So it's not like he was making it up.
User avatar #82 to #81 - adak
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
I might have phrased it a bit clumsily, but I was agreeing with you. What I want a source on is if just lying a rabbit on it's back, without it kicking or any other sudden trauma, might potentially kill it or give it permanent nerve damage, which is what some people are saying in the comments of the youtube video. Some of them are also saying that all rabbits get paralyzed when you put them on their backs, some explaining it as a stress-reflex, some that it is actually the nerves getting pinched. I might accept the stress-reflex explanation And a rabbit that was put on it's back from when it was small would learn that it wasn't dangerous and would be able to relax, at least if it trusted the people doing it , but an animal that got paralyzed if it rolled onto it's back wouldn't live long in the wild.
User avatar #85 to #82 - mrmystery
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Oh hey, no biggie. As for the laying on the back paralyzing it? I'm not sure. Nature does some pretty ******* stupid things in general.

I mean, if all crabs have a frigging latch you can just flip up in order to easily decapitate / instakill them ... nature can't have flawless logic.
User avatar #86 to #85 - instakill
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
yeah, crabs don't like me very much either way though
User avatar #87 to #86 - mrmystery
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Crabs can be jerks, yeah.
#89 to #85 - adak
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Yeah, but overall their shell gives them an evolutionary advantage. Most of their natural enemies don't have the necessary dexterety to do what humans do with their shells, except maybe octopi? Not that I've got rock solid knowledge about the life of crabs though.   
   
I have a hard time seeing any evolutionary advantage to getting physically paralyzed when you get on your back. As a stress-reflex it makes some sense, playing dead and all that, but if you realize it's not going to work it's still a better bet to just leg it. Also they stretch their backs pretty far when they run and it would be a pretty stupid design if both legs suddenly got paralyzed mid run if they stretched a just a little bit to far. Admittedly hilarious, but still incredibly stupid.
Yeah, but overall their shell gives them an evolutionary advantage. Most of their natural enemies don't have the necessary dexterety to do what humans do with their shells, except maybe octopi? Not that I've got rock solid knowledge about the life of crabs though.

I have a hard time seeing any evolutionary advantage to getting physically paralyzed when you get on your back. As a stress-reflex it makes some sense, playing dead and all that, but if you realize it's not going to work it's still a better bet to just leg it. Also they stretch their backs pretty far when they run and it would be a pretty stupid design if both legs suddenly got paralyzed mid run if they stretched a just a little bit to far. Admittedly hilarious, but still incredibly stupid.
#19 to #17 - herosoldier
Reply +14 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
PET HIM YOU SICK ****
PET HIM YOU SICK ****
#23 - chazta
Reply +18 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Reminded me of Overgrowth
Reminded me of Overgrowth
User avatar #27 to #23 - darkeyedangel
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
looks epic is it on steam?

User avatar #31 to #27 - vbeck
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
yes, but it is far from completion
#62 to #31 - holmborn
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
what is it called?
User avatar #64 to #62 - broswagonist
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Refer to the first comment in this.
User avatar #63 to #62 - kinginthenorth
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
User avatar #41 to #23 - smashingtonic
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
You can cross-map a dude with a thrown spear in this game
#44 to #23 - grimmwaters
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Comment Picture
User avatar #39 - pulluspardus
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
don't bunnies die when you take them to bath?
I had one that died this way....
#40 to #39 - pulluspardus
0 123456789123345869
has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #42 to #39 - APURPLEPYTHON
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
That's all small land mammals. They don't die if you just bathe them. They usually cant lift their heads out of the water far enough (they suck in water) and their lungs get water in them, because they aren't used to bathing, causing pneumonia. Then they die.
User avatar #53 to #39 - madlh
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
You have to make sure their ears stay dry. Their ears are one of the only ways they can control their body temperature, so if they get wet, they might get hypothermia and die.
User avatar #71 to #53 - adak
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
I don't really buy that. Maybe if you continuosly sprayed their ears with cold water for a prolonged time and kept it in a cold room. If an animal that lives in relatively open terrain, often in cold countries, died by getting its ears wet I can't see how they would survive in nature. You don't see a bunch of rabbits and hares dropping dead every time it rains. Maybe the heavily domesticised breeds can't handle it though.
#58 to #39 - thesticklebricks
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(04/10/2014) [-]
User avatar #69 to #58 - alstorp
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
oooooooo
User avatar #45 to #39 - sinonyx
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
you're supposed to keep their heads above the water..
#70 to #39 - luckybomb
Reply +8 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Hare today, gone tomorrow...
User avatar #43 to #39 - hellomynameisbill
Reply +13 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
did you put it in a ******* washing machine?
#14 - Kayz
Reply +11 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
It's a bunny in a bath!
It's a bunny in a bath!
#29 - weirddark
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
I have never seen a wet rabbit before
I have never seen a wet rabbit before
#13 - youborn
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
**youborn rolled image** Do what you must, I have already won
#16 to #13 - ilikepatatas
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
roll is related
#67 - dafogman
Reply +6 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
Comment Picture
User avatar #91 to #67 - adak
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/10/2014) [-]
I had never even contemplated if hedgehogs float. Now I know. And knowing is half the battle.