germans. . What I I was getting after buying , german shepherd: ttet! trr-! terrifying killing machine This cute sen sf a bitch!. >son of a bitch germans What I was getting after buying german shepherd: ttet! trr-! terrifying killing machine This cute sen sf a bitch! >son of bitch
Upload
Login or register
Hide Comments
Leave a comment Refresh Comments (64)
[ 64 comments ]
> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
#9 - pebar
Reply +74 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
>son of a bitch
#24 to #9 - lotengo [OP]
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Why not
#10 - azraelthemage
Reply +34 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Actually, a German shepard can be both if you raise them right. They'll be the most loyal friend you'll have, but god have mercy on anyone who threatens you in front of them. For they will not.
#38 - thechosentroll
Reply +13 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
People assume that larger dogs like pitbulls or german shepherds are pretty aggressive. This is complete ********. Frankly, I have no idea why, but a dogs' size and aggressiveness seem to be inversely proportional - the smaller it is, the more it wants to murder everything that moves. That's why a san bernard would never attack you unless you piss it off, while a poodle will try to rip out your kneecaps on sight. In reality, german shepherds are pushovers. That's one of the reasons they're used as police dogs - they'll never attack someone unless commanded to, since it's not in their nature. Same with pitbulls and most guard dogs - they're chosen, since they'd never attack their owners, but if they think you're a threat to their masters, they'll use your buttcheeks as dental floss.
#63 to #38 - meatygoodness
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
I remember back when I lived in Singapore there was this walled property with a big round window in the side out to the street. Every time I walked down there, this enormous german shepherd  would stick it's head out the window and bark at me until I ran away. But when I didn't run and let him smell my hand he turned out to be the biggest and softest lug you could hope to meet. Loved that dog
I remember back when I lived in Singapore there was this walled property with a big round window in the side out to the street. Every time I walked down there, this enormous german shepherd would stick it's head out the window and bark at me until I ran away. But when I didn't run and let him smell my hand he turned out to be the biggest and softest lug you could hope to meet. Loved that dog
User avatar #43 to #38 - Dember
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
You're absolutely right. Unfortunately, it's not necessarily the size of the dog, but quite literally how it is raised and treated by the people it lives with.

If a large dog were to growl or show teeth at someone, it would be corrected - because anyone in their right mind would realize that a 90 pound german shepherd, rottweiler, doberman or similar, should not be allowed to do this.

Unfortunately, when a chihuahua, dachshund, shih tzu or any other small breed does the exact same thing, most dismiss it because the dog is "harmless" or because "that's just how little dogs are." The actual term for it is "small dog syndrome".

It's really not fair to let them get away with it; it's the reason so many get put to sleep after they finally wind up dumped at shelters for bad behavior, when in reality the poor things were simply never taught any better.

In conclusion, ALL dogs deserve to be trained well, regardless of how big they are.
User avatar #46 to #43 - gigglesthegreat
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
******* amen to that... Girlfriend has two rat terriers that are agressive, annoying and loud. They don't permit much sleep or any kind of order in the house. "that's just how they are"... As a previous room-mate of a Tom Rose graduate, I learned that any bad behaviour is generally caused by either dismissing or lack of discouraging the animal to be more domesticated. In short, lots of people buy a pet that don't care to teach it even basic obedience in order to keep it from being chaotic.
#51 to #46 - Dember
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Speaking of people who get a "cool" pet without any form of proper research or preparation, my favorite animal falls victim to that probably more than any other - wolfdogs.
They are amazing creatures in their own right, but "true" wolfdogs (most actually have little to no wolf in them, just husky, malamute or shepherd mixes), genuine wolfdogs really have a lot of special needs and requirements. Most people just aren't willing to put that much time or effort into conforming their lives to provide one with a proper home or environment, and the animal inevitably suffers as a result.
I've wanted one for over ten years, and only recently have I felt that I am finally ready to take the next step and finally add a true "high-content" to my family - or maybe "pack" would be a better term.
These are the parents-to-be whom I will be getting a pup from soon, in case anyone would like to see. I'm pretty excited.
User avatar #54 to #51 - gigglesthegreat
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Those are two beautiful creatures! Wishing you luck and love for the new addition to the pack.
#56 to #54 - Dember
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Thank you~
I'm sure it will be a very rewarding experience, and well worth the wait.

I have been fortunate enough to handle and work with the "ambassadors" at a wolf and wolfdog rescue center before during educational fundraisers, but they have all passed away over the years.

I would love nothing more than to work with my future pup so that I can take him to places like schools and help teach others about them - you wouldn't believe just how many many myths and misconceptions there are about these animals.

Imagine the bad reputation of pit bulls, and multiply it by about ten; combined with the very troublesome issue that no one can tell a husky from a malamute, from a german shepherd from a wolfdog or even a pure wolf. : /
#48 to #46 - Dember
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Well said. I have several dogs (the four pictured here, plus two other lazy old farts who slept through the photoshoot...), ranging from 5 pounds to 90 pounds.
They're all equally friendly and lovable - because I wouldn't let them get away with nasty, unwanted behaviors like begging/stealing food, pulling on the leash or hogging the furniture - much less something potentially very dangerous (to others and to them) like growling at people.

I understand that some dogs are more difficult than others, but seriously people, hire a professional trainer if you need one; don't go letting your dog bite someone - you could end up getting sued, and worse, your dog could be confiscated and put down for being aggressive.
It's just not right.
User avatar #50 to #48 - gigglesthegreat
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
For the life of me I can't understand how it's legal to own an animal like that and NOT get it trained or learn to train it yourself. It's wrong. That would be along the same lines as not permitting a child to go to school, and then when they can't do math saying "they're brain damaged." We have an old lady in my apartment that has a mini-pincher that lunges and bites at people (anyone, mind you) and she reasons it as "she just doesn't like men". For having had the dog from being a pup, it's not been around any kind of mistreatment. That excuse doesn't fly.
User avatar #55 to #50 - Dember
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
That's another common excuse I can't stand - "Oh, s/he was abused!"
No. Nine times out of ten, that's not the case - poor training and socialization can mess up a dog far worse and for far longer than even severe physical abuse can.

I've worked with plenty of rescues who genuinely have been abused, confirmed by actual evidence: chipped/broken teeth, fractured ribs, scars, etc.
A dog who has been beaten might be shy, fearful, it might take a while to warm up to people, it might even wet itself if startled; but dogs "live in the now" and don't dwell on things that happened to them in the past. They can and will get over it if you give them the chance.

But being prone to growling, snapping or biting? That is NOT necessarily a sign of abuse or mistreatment - unless you consider "mistreating" to be failure to expose a puppy to new environments and people and teach them how to behave in those circumstances; which it kind of is, because it will hinder the animal for the rest of its life.
Even if you get a dog as an adult and they're already like that, it's never too late to start working with them.

I'm always kind of saddened when I'm at someone's house and they have to go lock their dog in another room because it's liable to attack people...I know good and well that, at some point, they're going to slip up and that dog is going to hurt someone, and probably pay the price with its life. : /

The only problem I have with my dogs is that they'll climb right on your lap if you let them, and they're pretty big and fluffy so most don't really appreciate it much. xP
User avatar #47 to #46 - gigglesthegreat
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
*encouraging
User avatar #58 to #43 - aldothenazi
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Its stupid the way it is I agree. In my opinion, you should never correct a big dog when its growling or showing teeth, its simply warning you that it doesnt want you to do what you are doing, and I'd rather have it give me a warning than just straight ahead rip my throat.
#60 to #58 - Dember
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
You don't teach the dog not to give warning signs - you teach the dog that it is not acceptable to be aggressive toward humans - essentially "don't bite the hand that feeds". There is a difference, but a professional trainer could probably explain it better than I can.

In any case, it is important for a dog to understand that it is not appropriate to snap or bite; you don't want to be the person who goes to pick up an object your dog has stolen and get your hand broken from a nasty bite; nor do you want an unsuspecting child to get too close to their treat and end up mauled because the dog doesn't understand that humans are the boss and it should not attack them over what they have given it.

I have a 90 pound husky mix and I can give him a steak bone (his favorite), then lean down and kiss him in the face. He just stops gnawing on it long enough to give me kisses with that full-body wag and goes back to his treat. He trusts that I won't take it from him, but he would let me if I wanted to.
Of course he will growl to warn another dog who tries to steal it, but he just hunches over it and tenses up to keep a good grip and still won't bite; I don't give them a chance to be a real nuisance to him about it before I scold them and send them back to their own treat. That's how it should be - it could spare him a death sentence and us a lawsuit, so it's definitely in the animal's best interest as well.
User avatar #61 to #60 - aldothenazi
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Yeah, but I meant in some situation where someone is angering the dog without knowing and in that case its good it gives a growling as warning, but I know some trainers try to train them never to growl or show teeth, in which case it skips the warning and goes straight to attack.
#64 to #61 - Dember
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
That really has more to do with understanding canine body language more so than anything else. I can always tell if mine are uncomfortable or on edge, their body language is unmistakable to me and I would intervene if someone else was making them feel that way.

For example, my boy doesn't really like hugs - he won't get mad about them, but to a dog, hugs can mimic dominance-mounting and that's a very threatening action.
I could hug him all I want, but I can tell he doesn't care for it so out of respect to him, I don't. Ironically, he loves being picked up and carried around on his back like when he was a puppy, though. I love 'im.
#7 - firuswolf
Reply +13 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
I like to pile **** on top of my German shepherd.
#8 to #7 - firuswolf
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
User avatar #18 to #8 - roflnaut
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Looks like he was getting hyped for his role in Ghosts.
#16 to #8 - anon id: 8fa034a3
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
He remembered to Rex, my German Shepherd. Was the most son of a bitch friend I ever had.
#19 - vladhellsing
Reply +6 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
I'd LOVE to have a black German shepherd.
#27 to #19 - alphagex
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
The term you are looking for is Groenendael i had one his name was tommy he was the smartest kidnesst and loyal dog ever
User avatar #28 to #27 - vladhellsing
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
That's a different breed, more commonly known as a Belgian shepherd. German shepherds can have black fur due to high melanin.
User avatar #49 to #28 - gigglesthegreat
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Actually there ARE black coated German shepherds. In the breeding world it's seen as a "defect" if you take the term as such. From what I know it's a recessive gene that is not so much rare as it is undesirable for most pure-bread shepherd owners. Personally I don't care, as my last best friend as a black german. Called him the derp-shepherd for his antics.
User avatar #52 to #49 - vladhellsing
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
That's what I just said, I was pointing out that the Groenendael is a different breed to German shepherds.
User avatar #53 to #52 - gigglesthegreat
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
ahh, gotcha
#29 to #28 - alphagex
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
You got the answer to everything don't you? and i learn something new today also how come that dog has red eye?
#30 to #29 - vladhellsing
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Because it's actually Alucard's hellhound RUN AWAY!
User avatar #31 to #30 - alphagex
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Oh god not this **** again please, i use to love hellsing but now i hate it with passion due to the sole and only fact that i once showed this to my ex gf and she role play as alucard worship hellsing like form of fanatic cultish and i just had it

please no more hellsing roleplaying i had my dose of that, i prefer your smart side

but seriously tho is it a picture thingy that turn the eye red?
User avatar #32 to #31 - vladhellsing
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Beats me. I've seen dogs with 'red' eyes before but on closer inspection they're actually a sort of burgundy/brown shade. The one in the picture at the top could just be a result of the lighting.
User avatar #33 to #32 - alphagex
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
i have random question who build the pyramids and how... i got feeling u know the answer for that for some reason
User avatar #34 to #33 - vladhellsing
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Klingons with sonic screwdrivers. Duh.
#35 to #34 - alphagex
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Shtap it vlud heavensing iam sirious
#37 to #35 - vladhellsing
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Hello Sirius, I'm Altair.
Bonus points if you get it.
#39 to #37 - alphagex
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
I rek u m8 for mocking me and not answeruing my ke-wash-tion   
   
 yeah altair is the protagonist from ass creed, but seriously u got any idea how the pyramids where build?
I rek u m8 for mocking me and not answeruing my ke-wash-tion

yeah altair is the protagonist from ass creed, but seriously u got any idea how the pyramids where build?
User avatar #40 to #39 - vladhellsing
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Sirius & Altair are actually stars in the night sky, the image was just to throw you off. Sirius is the brightest star in the night sky, in the Canis Major constellation, while Altair is the 12th brightest, in the Aquila constellation. No points for you.

I'm not a historian, archaeologist or engineer so I don't know how the pyramids were built. However, given how clever the Egyptians were and the relatively simple process of stacking one brick upon another, it seems like something they could and evidently have accomplished.
#41 to #40 - alphagex
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
Thank you for your answeres as always have this awesome arch-vile gif i just found
Thank you for your answeres as always have this awesome arch-vile gif i just found
#6 - chuffberry
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
my uncle has a german shepherd police dog and i have such respect for that mofo. he falls asleep on my lap and lets me rub his belly for hours, but i know for a fact that this dog has killed a person. pic related his name is Ranger
User avatar #59 - djjeroenski
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
every male dog is actually a son of a bitch
User avatar #65 to #59 - mattyjay
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
i was about to be all rude and smug and say, hurr erkshually, ebery dog is son of bitch

now i feel both dumb and ashamed...
User avatar #17 - OsamaBinLadenz
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/15/2014) [-]
People think the same thing about pitbulls. My pitbull loves anyone who doesn't threaten people she likes.
#3 - suikerpapa
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/14/2014) [-]
Comment Picture
User avatar #1 - crazyolitis
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/14/2014) [-]
...What normal person would buy a dog if he'd think it would be almost rabid in its behaviour?
User avatar #2 to #1 - lotengo [OP]
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/14/2014) [-]
Germans
#4 to #2 - anon id: 9a81cbb6
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/14/2014) [-]
>normal person
>germans

See what you did there?