JUST SAY IT. .. It's kind of unfair that there are 4 , and only 2 crackers to speak their case.
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JUST SAY IT

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Views: 36230
Favorited: 61
Submitted: 08/27/2013
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Comments(152):

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User avatar #6 - grandtheftkoala **User deleted account** (08/27/2013) [+] (7 replies)
It's kind of unfair that there are 4 ******* , and only 2 crackers to speak their case.
User avatar #9 - mymiddleleg (08/27/2013) [+] (9 replies)
Black people are racist *****
#20 - yiffcario ONLINE (08/27/2013) [+] (20 replies)
Words are words.
Get the **** over it.
You're gonna let a word upset you, you're ******* retarded.
#11 - mikepetru ONLINE (08/27/2013) [+] (1 reply)
Well it's obvious which word CNN thinks is worse.  Hooray for unbiased media.
Well it's obvious which word CNN thinks is worse. Hooray for unbiased media.
#60 - warrenzthehero (08/28/2013) [+] (27 replies)
Guys. Guys.   
Guys.   
   
"Cracker" in this context does not refer to the food cracker.   
However, contrary to popular opinion, neither does it mean the crack of a whip used by plantation overseers.   
   
The term "cracker" was in use during the Elizabethan era to describe braggarts. The original root of this is the Middle English word 'crack' meaning "entertaining conversation" (one may be said to "crack" a joke); this term and the Gaelicized spelling "craic" are still in use in Northern England, Ireland, and Scotland. It is documented in William Shakespeare's "King John" (1595):   
What cracker is this ... that deafes our ears    
With this abundance of superfluous breath?"   
   
By the 1760s the English, both at ohme and in the American Colonies, applied the term "cracker" to Scots-Irish and English American settlers of the remote southern back country, as noted in a passage from a letter to the Earl of Dartmouth:    
"I should explain to your lordship what is meant by crackers; a name they have got from being great boasters; they are a lawless set of Rascals on the frontiers of Virginia, Maryland, the Carolinas, and Georgia, who often change their places of abode."   
The word was later associated with the cowboys of Georgia and Florida, many of them descendants of those early frontiersmen.   
   
   
They weren't wealthy enough to even own slaves, so it can't refer to them cracking whips. That's a misremembering of the term by people who made up an explanation to fit their situation (Gosh, that's never happened before). Also, the song "Jimmy Crack Corn" sort of did the same thing.
Guys. Guys.
Guys.

"Cracker" in this context does not refer to the food cracker.
However, contrary to popular opinion, neither does it mean the crack of a whip used by plantation overseers.

The term "cracker" was in use during the Elizabethan era to describe braggarts. The original root of this is the Middle English word 'crack' meaning "entertaining conversation" (one may be said to "crack" a joke); this term and the Gaelicized spelling "craic" are still in use in Northern England, Ireland, and Scotland. It is documented in William Shakespeare's "King John" (1595):
What cracker is this ... that deafes our ears
With this abundance of superfluous breath?"

By the 1760s the English, both at ohme and in the American Colonies, applied the term "cracker" to Scots-Irish and English American settlers of the remote southern back country, as noted in a passage from a letter to the Earl of Dartmouth:
"I should explain to your lordship what is meant by crackers; a name they have got from being great boasters; they are a lawless set of Rascals on the frontiers of Virginia, Maryland, the Carolinas, and Georgia, who often change their places of abode."
The word was later associated with the cowboys of Georgia and Florida, many of them descendants of those early frontiersmen.


They weren't wealthy enough to even own slaves, so it can't refer to them cracking whips. That's a misremembering of the term by people who made up an explanation to fit their situation (Gosh, that's never happened before). Also, the song "Jimmy Crack Corn" sort of did the same thing.
User avatar #5 - lordlucifer (08/27/2013) [-]
I think a better question is who cares.
User avatar #13 - Darianvincent ONLINE (08/27/2013) [+] (2 replies)
Offended by the "N word"
User avatar #72 - jokeface (08/28/2013) [+] (12 replies)
Whenever I'm driving and I see a "Flagger Ahead" sign, I get uncomfortable, because flagger sounds like a derogatory word for a black homosexual.
#73 - nickkix (08/28/2013) [+] (1 reply)
this is a middle school english class debate topic, not a newsworthy story
#70 - eleanortook (08/28/2013) [+] (2 replies)
Comment Picture
#74 to #70 - rmoran (08/28/2013) [-]
gifforants.jpg
gifforants.jpg
#59 - newall (08/28/2013) [-]
neither.   
   
They're both just words.   
   
if you take offence to one of them, fine, that's your problem if you're using the word in an offensive manner, then fair enough. if, for example, you're singing along to a song, and you sing the word "						*****					", you're not a racist. if you call a friend "my 						*****					" you're not a racist, the word isn't racist. the word is a word. it has the meaning you intend it to have.   
if you, for example, say "GIT OFF MAH LAWN, YA DAMN 						*******					." you're probably using it in an offensive manner, and as a result, anyone hearing it has the right to feel offended, however, this does not mean they have the right to make this person stop saying these words, it's not his problem you're offended by them (his ignorance being overlooked, in this situation)   
   
   
   
TLDR: if you mean a word to have a negative connotation, it will do, no matter the word. If it's not meant offensively, then it's just a word. get over it.
neither.

They're both just words.

if you take offence to one of them, fine, that's your problem if you're using the word in an offensive manner, then fair enough. if, for example, you're singing along to a song, and you sing the word " ***** ", you're not a racist. if you call a friend "my ***** " you're not a racist, the word isn't racist. the word is a word. it has the meaning you intend it to have.
if you, for example, say "GIT OFF MAH LAWN, YA DAMN ******* ." you're probably using it in an offensive manner, and as a result, anyone hearing it has the right to feel offended, however, this does not mean they have the right to make this person stop saying these words, it's not his problem you're offended by them (his ignorance being overlooked, in this situation)



TLDR: if you mean a word to have a negative connotation, it will do, no matter the word. If it's not meant offensively, then it's just a word. get over it.
User avatar #87 - mrsockz (08/28/2013) [+] (5 replies)
They are both racist terms.
One is not any worse than the other.
If something is racist its just that, its racist. Racism doesn't ******* scale its all equally bad.
User avatar #41 - splosh (08/28/2013) [+] (4 replies)
For those of you who don't know this:

Cracker isn't referring to a delicious snack.
It's referring to the crack of the whip.

Not picking sides or anything, just throwing it out there for you guys.
User avatar #30 - foamytesquirrel (08/27/2013) [+] (3 replies)
I'm going to do something I've never done before. I'm going to try to be smart. Here goes.
****** originally meant lazy, or good for nothing, as I recall. ****** is an insult, but shouldn't be used only to black people. It should be used as it was defined. I'm *********** .
I wouldn't consider myself "good-for-nothing," but I certainly am lazy.
User avatar #54 to #30 - thelastamerican (08/28/2013) [-]
It's actually just refering to the Spanish word Negro. It means black.
#125 - lillquist (08/28/2013) [-]
plus there's 4 ******* and 2 crackers
User avatar #55 - thezyzogg (08/28/2013) [+] (1 reply)
Ninjas vs Crackers?
Nanny's vs Crackers?
Necrophilia vs Crackers?
What in the world could the 'N' stand for?
I'm so confused.
User avatar #17 - rabaneristo (08/27/2013) [-]
Censoring a word kinda feels like last century.
#12 - ROTFLcopter **User deleted account** (08/27/2013) [+] (1 reply)
Honestly, what white person has ever been seriously offended by the word cracker?
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