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#83 - EventHorizon (08/22/2013) [-]
To those of you who claim this statement makes no sense, you need to expand your minds to the finer details:   
   
The time periods between fossil deposit layers can represent millions upon millions of years. In that amount of time, absolutely everything changes: temperature, atmospheric gas levels, atmospheric pressure, biomes, and all of this is compounded by natural selection. If a SINGLE fossil was found out of order, the composition of the fossil would be its downfall, because we can determine a vast number of these variables from the fossil record, i.e. for a simple example the size of dinosaurs is a largely a result of the high levels of oxygen and CO2 in the atmosphere. This is what Dawkins is getting at; if a fossil was found out of place, it would completely stand out in the variables it would reveal about the world in which it died.
To those of you who claim this statement makes no sense, you need to expand your minds to the finer details:

The time periods between fossil deposit layers can represent millions upon millions of years. In that amount of time, absolutely everything changes: temperature, atmospheric gas levels, atmospheric pressure, biomes, and all of this is compounded by natural selection. If a SINGLE fossil was found out of order, the composition of the fossil would be its downfall, because we can determine a vast number of these variables from the fossil record, i.e. for a simple example the size of dinosaurs is a largely a result of the high levels of oxygen and CO2 in the atmosphere. This is what Dawkins is getting at; if a fossil was found out of place, it would completely stand out in the variables it would reveal about the world in which it died.
#169 to #83 - psychrophile (08/22/2013) [-]
I actually think you're over-complicating this quite a bit. The key point is that new forms arise over time. This means that, if evolution is true, certain forms must not have existed before a certain point in time. It is a simple and elegant argument, but it does have some problems, not the least of which is determining what that "certain point in time" should reasonably be. It is by no means impossible to do so, but it is difficult. That's why one of the best illustrations of the argument is a bit hyperbolic: the bunny fossil from Cambrian strata.
User avatar #284 to #169 - EventHorizon (08/22/2013) [-]
That was why I said "compounded by natural selection". Perhaps I should have clarified by adding "the chronology of".
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