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User avatar #69 - zzforrest (07/31/2013) [-]
The stereotypical heart shape actually came from a famous painting of a woman's ass.
#72 to #69 - lolfire (07/31/2013) [-]
The first known depiction of a heart as a symbol of romantic love dates to the 1250s. It occurs in a miniature decorating a capital S in a manuscript of the French Roman de la poire (National Library FR MS. 2086, plate 12). In the miniature, a kneeling lover offers his heart to a damsel. The heart resembles a pine-cone (held "upside-down", the point facing upward), in accord with medieval anatomical descriptions   
   
The "scalloped" shape of the now-familiar heart symbol, with a dent in its base, first arises in the early 14th century, at first only lightly dented, as in the miniatures in Francesco Barberino's Documenti d'amore (before 1320); a slightly later example with a more pronounced dent is found in a manuscript from the Cistercian monastery in Brussels (MS 4459–70, fol 192v. Royal Library of Belgium). The convention of showing a dent at the base of the heart thus spread at about the same time as the convention of showing the heart with its point downward.[4] The modern indented red heart has been used on playing cards since the late 15th century.[5]
The first known depiction of a heart as a symbol of romantic love dates to the 1250s. It occurs in a miniature decorating a capital S in a manuscript of the French Roman de la poire (National Library FR MS. 2086, plate 12). In the miniature, a kneeling lover offers his heart to a damsel. The heart resembles a pine-cone (held "upside-down", the point facing upward), in accord with medieval anatomical descriptions

The "scalloped" shape of the now-familiar heart symbol, with a dent in its base, first arises in the early 14th century, at first only lightly dented, as in the miniatures in Francesco Barberino's Documenti d'amore (before 1320); a slightly later example with a more pronounced dent is found in a manuscript from the Cistercian monastery in Brussels (MS 4459–70, fol 192v. Royal Library of Belgium). The convention of showing a dent at the base of the heart thus spread at about the same time as the convention of showing the heart with its point downward.[4] The modern indented red heart has been used on playing cards since the late 15th century.[5]
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