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> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
#12 - stickdick
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
User avatar #88 to #12 - gurtol
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
you're* dumbass
User avatar #13 to #12 - donutcaptin
Reply -4 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
but you dont point out "drink driving"...
User avatar #15 to #13 - holeymoley
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
because "drink driving" is an actual phrase
User avatar #37 to #15 - donutcaptin
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Drink driving would apply to UK, Australia and New Zealand.

As it implies intent, as opposed to actually being drunk.

You can have a couple of standard alcoholic drinks over a given hour and not be clinically "drunk " as such.

So drink driving leaves things a little more open to explanantion, drunk driving should mean that you were drunk behind the wheel of a car. Which is past tense.

Moral to this story is if you were caught drunk driving, then you have to be drunk, to use the phrase.

As opposed to drink driving, meaning anybody who has had a couple of beers and then gets behind the wheel, technically is or has been drink driving, regardless if they were affected by the alcohol or not.

Which is why most 1st world countries out there have an averaged one size fits all driver blood alcohol measurement road law, of a maximum amount of alcohol that can be tolerated, before it impairs a drivers judgement.

0.5 is the Australian set limit. Which roughly equates to 2 stand alcohollic drinks per hour, all night long with an hour break before you decide to get behind the wheel again..
User avatar #16 to #15 - donutcaptin
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
i think you are refering to drinking and driving or drunk driving.
User avatar #17 to #16 - holeymoley
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
User avatar #36 to #17 - donutcaptin
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Drink driving would apply to UK, Australia and New Zealand.

As it implies intent, as opposed to actually being drunk.

You can have a couple of standard alcoholic drinks over a given hour and not be clinically "drunk " as such.

So drink driving leaves things a little more open to explanantion, drunk driving should mean that you were drunk behind the wheel of a car. Which is past tense.

Moral to this story is if you were caught drunk driving, then you have to be drunk, to use the phrase.

As opposed to drink driving, meaning anybody who has had a couple of beers and then gets behind the wheel, technically is or has been drink driving, regardless if they were affected by the alcohol or not.

Which is why most 1st world countries out there have an averaged one size fits all driver blood alcohol measurement road law, of a maximum amount of alcohol that can be tolerated, before it impairs a drivers judgement.

0.5 is the Australian set limit. Which roughly equates to 2 stand alcohollic drinks per hour, all night long with an hour break before you decide to get behind the wheel again...
User avatar #18 to #17 - donutcaptin
Reply -4 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
oh maybe in the uk where grammar is subpar
User avatar #19 to #18 - holeymoley
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
you got proved wrong so you insult my country

real smooth.
User avatar #35 to #19 - donutcaptin
Reply -4 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Drink driving would apply to UK, Australia and New Zealand.

As it implies intent, as opposed to actually being drunk.

You can have a couple of standard alcoholic drinks over a given hour and not be clinically "drunk " as such.

So drink driving leaves things a little more open to explanantion, drunk driving should mean that you were drunk behind the wheel of a car. Which is past tense.

Moral to this story is if you were caught drunk driving, then you have to be drunk, to use the phrase.

As opposed to drink driving, meaning anybody who has had a couple of beers and then gets behind the wheel, technically is or has been drink driving, regardless if they were affected by the alcohol or not.

Which is why most 1st world countries out there have an averaged one size fits all driver blood alcohol measurement road law, of a maximum amount of alcohol that can be tolerated, before it impairs a drivers judgement.

0.5 is the Australian set limit. Which roughly equates to 2 stand alcohollic drinks per hour, all night long with an hour break before you decide to get behind the wheel again.
User avatar #21 to #19 - donutcaptin
Reply -4 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
whatever you say. drink drive isnt proper grammar. by saying drink drive you are implying drinking then driving. so u can use whatever excuse you want
#28 to #21 - sunnyday
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
>whatever you say. drink drive isnt proper grammar.
> so u can use whatever excuse you want
> isnt proper grammar.
>u
>oh maybe in the uk where grammar is subpar
>u

This *****.
User avatar #42 to #28 - donutcaptin
Reply -4 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
User avatar #34 to #28 - donutcaptin
Reply -4 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Drink driving would apply to UK, Australia and New Zealand.

As it implies intent, as opposed to actually being drunk.

You can have a couple of standard alcoholic drinks over a given hour and not be clinically "drunk " as such.

So drink driving leaves things a little more open to explanantion, drunk driving should mean that you were drunk behind the wheel of a car. Which is past tense.

Moral to this story is if you were caught drunk driving, then you have to be drunk, to use the phrase.

As opposed to drink driving, meaning anybody who has had a couple of beers and then gets behind the wheel, technically is or has been drink driving, regardless if they were affected by the alcohol or not.

Which is why most 1st world countries out there have an averaged one size fits all driver blood alcohol measurement road law, of a maximum amount of alcohol that can be tolerated, before it impairs a drivers judgement.

0.5 is the Australian set limit. Which roughly equates to 2 stand alcohollic drinks per hour, all night long with an hour break before you decide to get behind the wheel again.
User avatar #50 to #34 - sunnyday
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
See? Typing in full grammar, while complaining about Grammar, isn't that hard.

Though both terms are usable. As you just proved, both are proper grammar. It contradicts what you were initially saying.
#53 to #50 - fuckedbyapony
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Hardly counts when he copied and pasted it
This guys just doing a good job at proving himself to be an idiot and hypocrite
#29 to #28 - fuckedbyapony
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
>donutcaptin
User avatar #43 to #29 - donutcaptin
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
#48 to #43 - fuckedbyapony
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
More evidence against yourself?
#39 to #29 - donutcaptin
-2 123456789123345869
has deleted their comment [-]
#46 to #39 - fuckedbyapony
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Someone chose it, although i'm unsure of how you managed to misread it
User avatar #49 to #46 - donutcaptin
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
it was for emphasis. look at your ******* username you ******* faggot
User avatar #59 to #49 - sunnyday
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Now you're name calling?

Seems you've lost. I'll take my leave now.
#51 to #49 - fuckedbyapony
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Like i just said, i didn't chose it..
#52 to #51 - fuckedbyapony
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
choose* you hypocritical grammar faggot
User avatar #55 to #52 - sunnyday
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
You sir, have a good sense of humour.
#57 to #55 - fuckedbyapony
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Why thank you!
User avatar #54 to #52 - holeymoley
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
d-did you just shout at yourself?
#56 to #54 - fuckedbyapony
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
I don't even know, these early mornings are getting to me
User avatar #58 to #56 - holeymoley
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
oh god, im convulsing in my chair
User avatar #38 to #29 - donutcaptin
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Drink driving would apply to UK, Australia and New Zealand.

As it implies intent, as opposed to actually being drunk.

You can have a couple of standard alcoholic drinks over a given hour and not be clinically "drunk " as such.

So drink driving leaves things a little more open to explanantion, drunk driving should mean that you were drunk behind the wheel of a car. Which is past tense.

Moral to this story is if you were caught drunk driving, then you have to be drunk, to use the phrase.

As opposed to drink driving, meaning anybody who has had a couple of beers and then gets behind the wheel, technically is or has been drink driving, regardless if they were affected by the alcohol or not.

Which is why most 1st world countries out there have an averaged one size fits all driver blood alcohol measurement road law, of a maximum amount of alcohol that can be tolerated, before it impairs a drivers judgement.

0.5 is the Australian set limit. Which roughly equates to 2 stand alcohollic drinks per hour, all night long with an hour break before you decide to get behind the wheel again....
#41 to #38 - fuckedbyapony
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
So really you've just quoted a paragraph proving yourself wrong?
User avatar #44 to #41 - donutcaptin
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(07/24/2013) [-]
#23 to #21 - fuckedbyapony
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
'by saying drink drive you are implying drinking then driving'
Well that's exactly what 'drunk driving' is...
User avatar #40 to #23 - donutcaptin
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Drink driving would apply to UK, Australia and New Zealand.

As it implies intent, as opposed to actually being drunk.

You can have a couple of standard alcoholic drinks over a given hour and not be clinically "drunk " as such.

So drink driving leaves things a little more open to explanantion, drunk driving should mean that you were drunk behind the wheel of a car. Which is past tense.

Moral to this story is if you were caught drunk driving, then you have to be drunk, to use the phrase.

As opposed to drink driving, meaning anybody who has had a couple of beers and then gets behind the wheel, technically is or has been drink driving, regardless if they were affected by the alcohol or not.

Which is why most 1st world countries out there have an averaged one size fits all driver blood alcohol measurement road law, of a maximum amount of alcohol that can be tolerated, before it impairs a drivers judgement.

0.5 is the Australian set limit.. Which roughly equates to 2 stand alcohollic drinks per hour, all night long with an hour break before you decide to get behind the wheel again.
#24 to #23 - donutcaptin
Reply -4 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
so why not just say drunk driving which is proper grammar than **** brain
User avatar #31 to #24 - sunnyday
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
>Than
>Proper grammar

Again, this *****
User avatar #45 to #31 - donutcaptin
Reply -4 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
#27 to #24 - fuckedbyapony
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
Do i look like i made the ******* traffic laws?   
   
   
   
   
p.s you have terrible grammar for someone complaining about it
Do i look like i made the ******* traffic laws?




p.s you have terrible grammar for someone complaining about it
User avatar #47 to #27 - donutcaptin
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
User avatar #26 to #24 - holeymoley
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
because we had the language before you.
#33 to #26 - donutcaptin
Reply -4 123456789123345869
(07/24/2013) [-]
thats cute. do u remember that one time when you got your ass handed to you by a bunch of true patriots? well u did.