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What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
User avatar #72 - spawnconnery (07/07/2013) [-]
I was sitting in German class and these two stupid chicks were sitting there saying "Why can't everyone speak English?"
User avatar #88 to #72 - chiefrunnyjeans (07/07/2013) [-]
It actually would be nice if everyone just learned English. It's the dominant language in all global communication.
User avatar #89 to #88 - spawnconnery (07/07/2013) [-]
Nice as it would be, these bitches didn't understand why everyone speaks different languages, they weren't discussing how it would be easier if everyone learned one.
#84 to #72 - amuzen (07/07/2013) [-]
I read this and first I was like ha stupid bitches of course everyone can't just speak english because foreign languages.... are... wait why don't we all just try to learn how to speak english? I can't really see any benefit to people have a diversity of language, like I understand it takes time to learn a new language so a culture would be slow to change from their original language to the trade language...
I mean I guess some would argue chinese might be a better language for all the world to learn because it has the biggest population speaking it as a primary language but English is more readily available for people to learn world wide and is considered an easier language to pick up so... why not strive to make it so that everyone speaks English?
now lets get this straight I'm not saying why can't everyone just speak my language so I don't have to learn! what I'm saying is why can't everyone try to learn the same language so that we can all communicate world wide.

Although I digress, onto the original topic
I think that watching a ton of japanese cartoons has made it so I am better equipped to deal with foreign accents because my mom can't ever seem to understand anything they say but it makes perfect sense to me.
#90 to #84 - ordog (07/07/2013) [-]
I understand your point of view from an economic sense i.e. in a globalized world it would be more practical to have one unifying language in order to make communications between different groups easier. I used to think that made sense but I didn't take into account that language has a clear tie to a group's culture. Unifying nations under one language would gradually eliminate the cultural diversity we have. And that is not a hypothetical statement, it is actually something that is happening right now.    
A language is shaped to agree with the idiosyncrasy of the people using it. I remember an anthropology professor talking to me about how a tribe in the north pole (Sorry, I don't remember exactly where) had nearly 400 words for Snow! They had 400 words because snow is important for them. Each one of these 400 words describes what kind of snow it is. e.g. morning snow, hard snow, snow that melts easily, etc. In English we have many words for thing relating to drugs and sex (this is not a personal opinion, it is a fact).    
What i'm saying with this is that language agrees with the lifestyle of a population, and this determines their philosophical viewpoint of the world. So making one language the norm, or the common language, would just kill cultures that have been shaped by thousands of years of civilization in order to create a more economically sensible world. Some could argue that this is a good thing because the overvaluation of one's beliefs (religion, economical-political orientation, philosophical viewpoint) is the motor of war and destruction (I'm thinking of E.M Cioran, goo.gl/JsIic)  but plurality is actually the motor of development because of competition, which is the premise behind capitalism.    
I will leave this TED talk here about why having different cultures (remember cultures and languages are inextricably tied)  is so important.  [url deleted]    
   
For my lazy friends TL;DR: having one language affects cultural and economical development.
I understand your point of view from an economic sense i.e. in a globalized world it would be more practical to have one unifying language in order to make communications between different groups easier. I used to think that made sense but I didn't take into account that language has a clear tie to a group's culture. Unifying nations under one language would gradually eliminate the cultural diversity we have. And that is not a hypothetical statement, it is actually something that is happening right now.
A language is shaped to agree with the idiosyncrasy of the people using it. I remember an anthropology professor talking to me about how a tribe in the north pole (Sorry, I don't remember exactly where) had nearly 400 words for Snow! They had 400 words because snow is important for them. Each one of these 400 words describes what kind of snow it is. e.g. morning snow, hard snow, snow that melts easily, etc. In English we have many words for thing relating to drugs and sex (this is not a personal opinion, it is a fact).
What i'm saying with this is that language agrees with the lifestyle of a population, and this determines their philosophical viewpoint of the world. So making one language the norm, or the common language, would just kill cultures that have been shaped by thousands of years of civilization in order to create a more economically sensible world. Some could argue that this is a good thing because the overvaluation of one's beliefs (religion, economical-political orientation, philosophical viewpoint) is the motor of war and destruction (I'm thinking of E.M Cioran, goo.gl/JsIic) but plurality is actually the motor of development because of competition, which is the premise behind capitalism.
I will leave this TED talk here about why having different cultures (remember cultures and languages are inextricably tied) is so important. [url deleted]

For my lazy friends TL;DR: having one language affects cultural and economical development.
#95 to #90 - amuzen (07/07/2013) [-]
I understand it would effect cultural and economical development but I believe it would effect it in a positive manner because people would be able to develop as a global community with a sort of mega culture shaped by smaller kind of meta cultures.

also they didn't really have 400 different words for snow they just had prefixs similar to our adjectives that modified the meaning of the word snow so it would be like instead of saying hard snow it would be hardsnow
I do get where you're coming from though I understand it 'effects' a culture but I think the positives would outweigh the negatives by such a ridiculous degree those changes would be kind of negligible.
#96 to #95 - ordog (07/07/2013) [-]
I would agree with you if what you were talking about was having some sort of lingua franca or bridge language for practical purposes while retaining smaller languages and cultures. I believe that homogeneity is unhealthy, and it doesn't have positive effects.

Do you know the name of the tribe with the snow words? I would like to look into that more deeply.
By the way, "affect" is used as a verb. Effect is the resulting change.
#97 to #96 - amuzen (07/07/2013) [-]
I don't recall their name I learned about them in my native arts class back in middle school, since I grew up on an island that was predominately Tlingit and Haida our focus was almost entirely on those tribes.
#92 to #90 - ordog (07/07/2013) [-]
Sorry, the last URL is this one
[url deleted]
#93 to #92 - ordog (07/07/2013) [-]
Sorry again, I can't seem to post the link, Last try.
[url deleted]
#94 to #93 - ordog (07/07/2013) [-]
If anyone is still interested search Wade Davis: Dreams from endangered cultures, In TED talks.
If anyone is still interested search Wade Davis: Dreams from endangered cultures, In TED talks.
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#91 to #90 - ordog has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #86 to #84 - spawnconnery (07/07/2013) [-]
While yes I see your point, the way they were talking about it was as if they couldn't fathom why other people spoke other languages, they weren't saying it would be more logical if people spoke the same language.
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