I'm going to fill you up. . DON' T MOVE. er I' ll " you full of Mi, lead. Ir. antimony. Msot, silver. 200 parts per nickel. trace amounts , and ether beetter th
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I'm going to fill you up

DON' T MOVE. er I' ll " you full of Mi, lead.
Ir. antimony. Msot, silver. 200 parts per
nickel. trace amounts , and ether
beetter their respective limits!
Wait a minute!
Are these values
ts, - CERTIFIED?!
Analytical Chemists in the Wild West
...
+1148
Views: 44593
Favorited: 60
Submitted: 05/21/2013
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#1 - tellybear (05/22/2013) [+] (2 replies)
User avatar #3 - holler (05/22/2013) [+] (4 replies)
johnny was a chemists son
but johnny is no more
what johnny thought was H20
was H2SO4
#2 - duskmane (05/22/2013) [-]
Comment Picture
#8 - bubbleisacat ONLINE (05/22/2013) [-]
Related
#6 - archiehicox (05/22/2013) [+] (2 replies)
Gorramit just shoot the guy!
Gorramit just shoot the guy!
#10 to #6 - crazyoljew (05/22/2013) [-]
How dare you disrespect Nathan Fillion
How dare you disrespect Nathan Fillion
User avatar #7 - rufless (05/22/2013) [-]
and the punch line for this would be:

-You'll hafta find out
#16 - dashgamer (05/22/2013) [-]
Die! Die! Die!   
A word, of course, whose etymology originates from the Anglo-Saxon Middle English term Deien. Considering the Saxon's Germanic origins, it is quite obvious that deien, an archaic verb for expiring, was then abbreviated to die with the gradual omission of the -en conjugations for verbs as the Middle Ages progressed in England after the Norman invasion that initially brought Saxon culture to the isles.
Die! Die! Die!
A word, of course, whose etymology originates from the Anglo-Saxon Middle English term Deien. Considering the Saxon's Germanic origins, it is quite obvious that deien, an archaic verb for expiring, was then abbreviated to die with the gradual omission of the -en conjugations for verbs as the Middle Ages progressed in England after the Norman invasion that initially brought Saxon culture to the isles.
#9 - xxxsonic fanxxx (05/22/2013) [-]
This isn't even funny for a chemistry joke and the amount of thumbs is a ridiculous. I shall bathe in the sea of red thumbs.
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