The curtains were blue. The curtains represent the color of the author's ball sack because of the sexual frustration he is having. a book about blue Balls
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[ 57 comments ]
> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
#8 - kievaughnb
Reply +81 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
#42 to #8 - potatotrousers
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
you won all my internets
#24 - howaboutnsfw
Reply +22 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
But why did he make the author's side of the venn diagram blue? And why the teacher's side red? Lets take a moment to discuss this, class.
#23 - majormoron
Reply +20 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
Comment Picture
#46 to #23 - sheperdofthestars
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
Comment Picture
#14 - poopygoldfart
Reply +17 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
Story time
>be 17
>german lesson (I live in germany)
>we're just dealing with kafka the process and reached approx. the middle of the book
>teacher: who's good at drawing?
>everyone in class goes like: anon is !
>************.jpeg
>have to draw a picture for every chapter we've dealt with so far and summ up the most important stuff in only one picture
>didntread.jpeg
>do so and just randomly pick and draw scenes from it
>fast foward 4 days
>nervous as **** teacher wants to show pictures to class
> teacher spends an hour saying what I wanted to express with the picture and extracting every little ******* detail on the pic (color of things, which perspective I used, size of things)
>"right anon?"
>mfw ....
User avatar #18 to #14 - mightypower
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
I just finished reading Kafka in Uni and now I have a 3000 word essay on it due Wednesday. Ich bin glücklich
#43 to #18 - poopygoldfart
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
That's pretty cool for you son ... I got 99 Problems but Kafka ain't one
That's pretty cool for you son ... I got 99 Problems but Kafka ain't one
User avatar #59 to #43 - mightypower
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
Thanks bro
User avatar #38 to #14 - BubsyB
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
I always have that with art, draw random **** that I think would be cool to draw and teacher yammers about the emotions of it and the abstract factor and I just sit there nodding my head thinking she's ******* insane.
User avatar #12 - thedarkestrogue
Reply +14 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
I am writer. I can confirm this.
#15 to #12 - anon id: b972d5a2
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
Well then you're probably not a very good one.
User avatar #32 to #15 - thedarkestrogue
Reply +12 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
Never said I was.
#54 - anon id: bada6879
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
What the author meant: The curtains were ******* blue.
#55 to #54 - faroeseguy
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
is this like the youtube mentality, where you repeat what was in the content?
User avatar #20 - dapape
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
If the author went out of their way to describe curtains I'm sure the English teacher is onto something.
User avatar #30 to #20 - mylazy
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
I am writing a book now, and I can personally attest to the fact that half the descriptions I write are just so that the person can visualize what he is reading. Granted it has taken me half a year to get 4,000 words written, so I obviously am not very good at this.
User avatar #13 - randomserb
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
What the author meant doesn't really matter all that much as long as your own interpretation satisfies you.
#2 - aweswes
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
Nope.

Why would the author write that the curtains were blue for no real reason? If he's giving information about the setting so that readers can better picture what's going on, then I'll agree with you. However, it's such a specific detail that it has to mean more than just the literal, otherwise it's a worthless sentence.

Don't believe me? Read any - and I mean any - authors' criticism of their own work. There's reason for such detail.
#3 to #2 - anon id: 03f2f615
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
fasle
#58 - Wumbologist
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(05/04/2013) [-]
Ok, I've seen this picture a lot, and I've been in a high school English class, so I definitely know where this post is coming from, but in poetry and literature, the author never just writes "fluff," or just a needless detail without a reason behind it. Colors are especially important to symbolism, especially such colors as red and blue, which respectively represent passion and calm. So, yes, while sometimes English teachers can dive a bit much into a work of literature, the author doesn't tell you things about the setting just for ***** and giggles.   
   
funny gif so I don't get thumbed down for having an opinion
Ok, I've seen this picture a lot, and I've been in a high school English class, so I definitely know where this post is coming from, but in poetry and literature, the author never just writes "fluff," or just a needless detail without a reason behind it. Colors are especially important to symbolism, especially such colors as red and blue, which respectively represent passion and calm. So, yes, while sometimes English teachers can dive a bit much into a work of literature, the author doesn't tell you things about the setting just for ***** and giggles.

funny gif so I don't get thumbed down for having an opinion