Et Tu Brutus?. When does the ride end?.. Brute it's vocative, not nominative never
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> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
#15 - mitdwit
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(03/25/2013) [-]
#49 to #15 - redtheninja
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#56 to #49 - skateabuga
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User avatar #21 to #15 - aproudpatriot
Reply +34 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
when Julius Caesar was being assassinated, it's rumored that he noticed one of his assassins was his best friend, brutus, so he said "et tu, brute?" which is latin for "you too, brutus?"
#24 to #21 - mitdwit
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(03/25/2013) [-]
User avatar #60 to #21 - wiredguy
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(03/25/2013) [-]
It's not rumoured, in fact there's absolutely no evidence to say it ever happened, It's just what Shakespeare wrote for his last words.
As far as we know, it's completely fictional.
User avatar #32 to #21 - pikachupokemon
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(03/25/2013) [-]
wasn't brutus his son?
User avatar #36 to #32 - revorce
Reply +12 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
Adopted son.
#64 to #21 - animepsycchosecond
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has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #5 - wiredguy
Reply +58 123456789123345869
(03/24/2013) [-]
Brute*

it's vocative, not nominative
User avatar #6 to #5 - clarksonius
Reply -27 123456789123345869
(03/24/2013) [-]
Brutus is the guy who Ceasar saw as his best friend, ''et tu Brutus?'' was what he said after everybody including Brutus betrayed him.



*******.
User avatar #7 to #6 - wiredguy
Reply +16 123456789123345869
(03/24/2013) [-]
Latin noun endings change to fit their purpose
the name "Brutus" is given in English in it's nominative form
when spoken to directly, nouns take the vocative ending
which, for the second declension, is -e

*******.
User avatar #8 to #7 - clarksonius
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(03/24/2013) [-]
You seem to be right sir, excuse me. =]
#58 to #8 - anon id: df46d806
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(03/25/2013) [-]
Excuses himself politely while acknowledging greater knowledge, gets red thumbed to hell. Nice one.
User avatar #69 to #58 - babyanalraper
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(03/25/2013) [-]
He did act like a jerk in the first post though.
#9 to #6 - Theyneverknow
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(03/24/2013) [-]
Clevar
Clevar
User avatar #23 to #6 - lateday
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
Latin nouns decline depending on the grammatical role. Brutus is the nominative form. Being a subject. But Brute is its vocative form, when it is being addressed.
#20 to #6 - historicalgirl
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(03/25/2013) [-]
In the play by Shakespeare, which is where this phrase is from, it's written as Brute.
#13 to #5 - anon id: 89c4e8f3
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(03/25/2013) [-]
who ******* cares?
User avatar #61 to #5 - greensoap
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
also it was "tu quoque brute"
User avatar #62 to #61 - wiredguy
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
Not in the play by Shakespeare it wasn't, it was indeed "et tu, Brute?".
Some people think he spoke a Greek sentence, which would have been that in Latin, only with "my child" (or "fili mi") on the end as well, which is where some speculation about Brutus being Caesar's son comes from.

Though the view of the historian whose works this information came from said himself that Caesar was silent as he died, all quotes were claims of others he merely mentioned.
Though, of course, because of the way generals/emperors/et cetera were treated and thought of, we can't be sure of very much information at all.
User avatar #71 to #5 - mrqoqlobo
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(03/25/2013) [-]
Etiam tu, mi fili Brute?
#17 - mizzycupcakes
Reply -29 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
#18 to #17 - admiralshepard
Reply +33 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
I . . . it's Shakespeare . . . . you know, "Julius Caesar"? . . . "Et tu Brute?"
I . . . it's Shakespeare . . . . you know, "Julius Caesar"? . . . "Et tu Brute?"
#38 to #18 - dovakinbronie
Reply -11 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
i don't think it was shakespeare
"Et tu Brute?" was the last thing Caesar said after he got stabed in the back
i guess it means like " and you brutus?"
(pic not realeted)
User avatar #41 to #38 - messerauditore
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
He said that in Shakespeare's play...
User avatar #42 to #41 - dovakinbronie
Reply -12 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
yes
but he also said it in real life when he died
User avatar #43 to #42 - messerauditore
Reply -6 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
Thumbs me down for still being right... wow.
User avatar #45 to #43 - dovakinbronie
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(03/25/2013) [-]
you knnow what
i am sorry for being rude i should accept that you are tryn' to help me learn
and for that i just want to say : Thank you!
#44 to #43 - dovakinbronie
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#57 to #44 - allion
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
messerauditore and dovakinbronie

Caesar did not say that in real life. Shakespeare made that line in his play.
User avatar #97 to #57 - messerauditore
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(03/25/2013) [-]
Please, humor me. I'd like to know why.
#104 to #97 - allion
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(03/26/2013) [-]
you seem upset
you seem upset
User avatar #103 to #97 - allion
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(03/26/2013) [-]
whoops hm I'm not sure why
User avatar #96 to #57 - messerauditore
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
Thats exactly what I said. Why the **** am I getting red thumbs for it?
User avatar #70 to #38 - ragnarfag
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(03/25/2013) [-]
"Also you, brutus?"
But the quote is from the shakespeare's play.
User avatar #54 - bobvonbobby
Reply +14 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
How do Mexicans cut their pizza?
User avatar #55 to #54 - bobvonbobby
Reply +30 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
With Little Caesars.
#63 to #55 - kickboxingbanana
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
Actually, i use a the pizza cutter. :) but that was funny have a gif!
Actually, i use a the pizza cutter. :) but that was funny have a gif!
User avatar #65 to #63 - kickboxingbanana
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(03/25/2013) [-]
you see no a in my sentence!
#10 - morkoelorko
Reply +25 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
Et tu feelus?
#16 to #10 - xpurpledragonx
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
Take this.
User avatar #30 to #16 - nyangiraffe
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(03/25/2013) [-]
Feelus just sounds too close to phallus
#27 - zekeon
Reply +20 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
mfw people not getting it
mfw people not getting it
#33 to #27 - anon id: 98fc9371
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(03/25/2013) [-]
********* Darksouls?
#34 to #27 - abaraxus
Reply +9 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
Comment Picture
User avatar #11 - soulstealerr
Reply +20 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
Didn't I kill this guy in Fallout NV?
#72 to #11 - anon id: 0b3478bf
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(03/25/2013) [-]
According to my version he died when I was giving him surgery [Charisma 7]
#12 to #11 - cameronisepic
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(03/25/2013) [-]
Fallout joke, thumb for you.
#67 - thewizsam
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(03/25/2013) [-]
User avatar #76 to #67 - anthonyh
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(03/25/2013) [-]
In the play "Julius Caesar", Caesar's "friend" Brutus kills stabs him and Caesar says "Et Tu Brute?", which is where the title of the post came from.
#82 to #76 - anon id: f2245a0d
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(03/25/2013) [-]
Caesar and Brutus were great friends, but Brutus had strong feelings about upholding the will of the people and doing what's in their best interest, a group of Brutus' friends managed to trick him into thinking that Caesar was going to become a powerful dictator and bring misery to the people so he was in on the plot to kill Caesar. the words "Et tu Brute" were Caesars last words as Brutus stabbed him and has now become a way to convey a feeling of betrayal towards one you consider to be your friend.
User avatar #80 to #76 - yusay
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(03/25/2013) [-]
Wasn't Brutus still Caesar's friend? He was the only conspirator to truly believe that killing Caesar was for the good of the people and not advancing his own goals, and did it to protect his friend from becoming a tyrant. Just what I can remember from it.
#85 to #80 - anon id: f2245a0d
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(03/25/2013) [-]
that's exactly it, but the line is meant to convey a feeling of betrayal of someone you consider to be your friend.
User avatar #84 to #80 - neutralgray
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(03/25/2013) [-]
Pretty much. The play also tells you, though, that despite Brutus being an honorable man, he has a pretty ****** judge of character.
User avatar #87 to #84 - yusay
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(03/25/2013) [-]
I don't think the play had to tell anyone that, it was really obvious that he was a ****** judge of character.
#28 - jimthesquirrelking
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(03/25/2013) [-]
#68 - therealredhood
Reply +10 123456789123345869
(03/25/2013) [-]
I never read the play and I got it.
I never read the play and I got it.