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What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
User avatar #2 - crazyhindu (02/06/2013) [-]
this doesn't exactly make much sense since america was one of the later countries to get rid of slavery, i mean half of the world was done with it and we were still finding ways to **** up a black persons life
User avatar #55 to #2 - admiralen ONLINE (02/06/2013) [-]
missisippi got rid of slavery 1994, progress
User avatar #19 to #2 - garvielxloken (02/06/2013) [-]
We may have had it a lot later than other countries, but considering how short of a time we'd been a country, I think we did a pretty damn good job getting rid of it.
#15 to #2 - bigmanblue (02/06/2013) [-]
it does make sense because its america that finds racism in every comment related to blacks
seriously iv had conversations people (black or white) which in any european country would be fine but in america they are sudenly racist
#3 to #2 - xxxsonic fanxxx (02/06/2013) [-]
If I may be "that" guy. This isn't exactly true. The entire world was dealing with racism, and Europe and many parts of the world to this day still have significant trouble with it. The difference was, our former slaves were living with us, whereas most slaves of the European nations were in their colonies. And places like South Africa still had segregation up until the 1990s. Slavery in Africa continued up until the 20th century. In Oceania up until the 1860s (and the US was still very much divided on slavery, but ended external slave trade the same time as the British in 1808), and many European colonies also kept slaves after the US had abolished it.

We weren't really behind anyone, but we were also a very diverse country, and we actually managed to find harmony faster than most other countries.

The pursuit of African-Americans, embodies precisely what the US stands for. The fight for liberty and equality, and they most certainly have achieved that.
User avatar #11 to #3 - beerterror (02/06/2013) [-]
Yeah, but you're missing one point. Racism isn't now about negroes, who are mostly peaceful and educated people (In europe at least). Racism in Europe is about, or should be about muslims, who recently started to pose a threat to European culture. When leftist governments do nothing but encourage them, they are trying to impose sharia law, decompose everything that our Greco-Germanic past has passed on to us.

And this, my friend is the tragedy of modern age - what in the 30' appeared to be an ideology of genocide and crime, nowadays is a symptom of common sense and will to defend your culture.
User avatar #16 to #11 - NiceMelons (02/06/2013) [-]
The loud minority define the majority, and it worries me that you really believe this about Islam. (If you do, I hope you don't)
User avatar #17 to #16 - beerterror (02/06/2013) [-]
Don't thousands protest? Are those killings, the murals and protest signs fake? I don't think so. Majority of Middle East and what comes from there is mentally in Middle Ages and I'll be gladly proven wrong... But I doubt that. Some days ago, about a week maybe, there was a short film on BBC youtube account showing Muslim militia, hooded, strolling around in some big city, perhaps even London, posing threats to short-skirted girl who was not a whore, but just waiting for her boyfriend, and the other scene showed them taking and pouring out a beer from a guy in the park. How do you call that my friend?
User avatar #18 to #17 - NiceMelons (02/06/2013) [-]
Once again, a minority. There are millions of people who practise Islam and it is a small minority of fundamentalists (the very meaning of the word in the Islamic context is the imposition of Islamic law, at least in part) command the largest proportion of media coverage. Islam is broad, and massively misrepresented, that's all I'm saying, and it worries me that people will throw their opinions behind matters that they really don't know much about. I don't claim to be an expert, but I know that Islam stands, on the most basic level, for peace and humility (inb4 "Islam is peace, submit or die, etc.) and for that reason I refuse to condemn all Muslims for practising their faith. /rant
User avatar #27 to #18 - xzynth (02/06/2013) [-]
Agree with both, but want to add some aspects to this discussion.
1. The quran contains a line which says the following "If the majority in a country is muslim, then the muslims are allowed to make the country muslim." Or atleast something similar, if I'm misquoting terribly wrong please correct me.
2. I can absolutely understand a certain dissaproval of a religion if members of the religion comes to your country, and even if its only a minority, tries to force their culture upon you, as I believe "beerterror" pointed out.

I don't hate muslim, no. I don't hate islam. But i don't want to live in a muslim country, and I dont appricate the "few" poeple who makes our streets unsafe.
User avatar #30 to #27 - NiceMelons (02/06/2013) [-]
Fair enough, and I honestly understand where you're coming from. I just have issues when people extrapolate problems that are in a minority to the majority. For example, attempts to force Muslim culture, indeed, as you correctly pointed out, this is in the Qu'ran, but it is not followed by every Muslim. This seems obvious, and I'm not suggesting you believe that it is, it's just that some people (particularly from where I used to live) really do. My father, for example, is the kind of man who will assume that every Muslim has a bomb strapped to them, he may as well be the Texan guy from Borat.
User avatar #34 to #30 - xzynth (02/06/2013) [-]
first things first, Thanks for keeping this "debate" clean. You are really being quite tolerant upon our attacks on "Islam". This thread could easly become a flamewar where we would be yelling faggot and stupid insults after each other, but this thread is relativly "clean".

second, I'm sorry, I did infact generalize Islam when I mentioned the quote. I guess i forgot to be precise.

and third, i would like to present a thoery of mine on this subject: "that the reason the minority is such wastly presented, is not only because of the medias evil grip on our fear, but aswell the Islam is the second biggest religion in the world, which means teh minority of Islam will be quite a few people.
User avatar #35 to #34 - NiceMelons (02/06/2013) [-]
Thank you too, and please don't apologise, I didn't mean to sound aggressive. And of course you're right, it is a sizeable minority, but due to Islam being a widely practised religion, there are a huge proportion of people who are non-fundamentalist too. But certainly yes, the media is not a singular factor, though I would argue that media sensationalism is of pretty pivotal significance.
User avatar #22 to #18 - beerterror (02/06/2013) [-]
I don't attack Islam, please understand, just as I don't attack Christianity, Buddhism or Slavic Paganism. I don't care if you think Plato or Aristotle was right about patterns, you know? I attack people. They can be minority - but doesn't that minority happen to cause much evil, and is looking forward for doing more? They don't have to do it right away: Muslim majority in one little Danish town canceled Christmas celebration and imposed fines on people who put christmas trees on their porches.
It's Kulturkampf all again, only people seem to don't care anymore, or they are scared. And one more thing - how are stoning women for being raped going with your thesis about Islam being all flowers and **** ? Such things are quite frequent in media, and I'm sure most of them go unheard of by the public.
User avatar #26 to #22 - NiceMelons (02/06/2013) [-]
OK, I understand, it's just when you use the phrase "racism should be about muslims" you can understand why I'd get the impression you were against Islam in general.
Also, of course stoning is a disgusting practise, but it is important to mention that it isn't mentioned in the Qur'an, so is arguably not an Islamic practise, it is, once again, a fundamentalist issue. However, it is present in the Hadith, yet it you examine it (which I must confess I have not, since my student days) you see it in the context of other religions,often employed after questioning on what the usual practise would be. I just think it's really important not to shelve Islam and Muslims in general as a result of extreme news stories.

Also, it's quite amusing how you say you don't attack Islam, then go on to attack Islam (with good reason, but we've been over the issues around that previously).
User avatar #32 to #26 - beerterror (02/06/2013) [-]
Yeah, I might sound a bit hypocritical - I indeed consider Islam, along with Judaism, the most archaic religion. And also - Middle Eastern muslim world, since the Arabic domination ended, and Turks took over, has practically not one philosopher, scientist, writer. Can you explain it to me otherwise, than just by pointing that that terrain, with harsh climate, experience almost none of the benefits of the modern technology. And the only governments who really try to set the living standards higher, were either overthrown by sharia regimes, or, like in Turkey, are military regimes who are, sadly, the only way to keep the fundamentalist chaos in order.

The same happens as happened in Europe during Middle Ages, everything is controlled by religious beliefs, if it doesn't go well with them, or if it can impose a threat of people thinking outside the box - then burn it. But Europe endured it thousand years ago, when Islam was busy with saving the Greek heritage from destruction, the sole deed we should be grateful for. But, as I said before - they regressed unimaginably, back to way of thinking we usually associate with the Holy Inquisitors, or some other popular culture tropes.
User avatar #33 to #32 - NiceMelons (02/06/2013) [-]
OK, you have your opinion, and it does have foundation, which is genuinely refreshing. I must confess that I cannot reasonably account for issues in the Middle East as I am not an expert and, as such, cannot speak with any authority (the husband's the expert on Islam, China's more my area). However, I'd just like to something to think about; is religion arguably not on the rise again here? I was reading a book recently in which the author said it was inconceivable that Americans would allow any integration between religion and politics. This was written in 1984, so obviously American priorities were different. But has there not been a backtrack? For example, and I know this is an extreme case, you would very rarely hear an MP in the Commons say "This country is a Christian country" shortly before embarking on political rhetoric. Now, I know that this is not common for every politician and that this is an extreme case, but the point is that it is religion, not Islam, Judaism or any specific one, that causes reaction. Be careful before you assume that the West is advanced and secular when I can assure you it is not. (For anyone about to ask; well why is it technologically more advanced? Industrial Revolution, Capitalism as the new religion, that's my argument. But as I say, China's more my area).
User avatar #10 to #3 - trojanmannn (02/06/2013) [-]
Little known fact, 90% of the slaves from the international slave trade went to places other than America.
User avatar #4 to #3 - crazyhindu (02/06/2013) [-]
i think i can accept defeat on this one
User avatar #29 to #4 - xzynth (02/06/2013) [-]
"A gentleman will admit defeat when he is defeated"
User avatar #6 to #4 - saddestofbreads (02/06/2013) [-]
A civilized conversation on Funnyjunk? A thumb for the both of you!
User avatar #39 to #6 - crazyhindu (02/06/2013) [-]
lol most of my conversations tend to be civilized i hate going into an all out flame war unless i am bored
#8 to #6 - frohling (02/06/2013) [-]
none's a faggot?? guess i'll thumb
none's a faggot?? guess i'll thumb
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