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What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
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#277 - bitchesloveleavess **User deleted account** has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #279 to #277 - sphinxe (01/30/2013) [-]
Nope, it's true.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704113504575263994195318772.html
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#280 to #279 - bitchesloveleavess **User deleted account** has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #283 to #280 - sphinxe (01/30/2013) [-]
That's true, but after some digging I found: "Four years after the publication of the paper, other researchers' results had still failed to reproduce Wakefield's findings or confirm his hypothesis of a relation between childhood gastrointestinal disorders and autism."

It's like the guy who said subliminal messages work, he made a load of his research up to prove his point.
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#286 to #283 - bitchesloveleavess **User deleted account** has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #288 to #286 - sphinxe (01/30/2013) [-]
Yeah, it actually caused a huge health scare in the UK. It's even in science text books and everything.

Normally when scientists produce statements like that there are people who run the same test, so there are some people at fault that it caused such a scare. Normally with such a sweeping statement there would be those who would examine the correlation before it was released - but somehow it sipped through.

I think also with looking into the effects of vaccines, reports like the correlation between the vaccine and autism should be seriously scrutinized in future.
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