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User avatar #4 - ilovedickbuttxd (01/22/2013) [-]
they have a point, tho..
yeah a math exam requieres some intelligence too, but also memory.
i've never understood why they want us to remember everything as correct as possible when answering a test if we'll forget most of it eventualy...
User avatar #9 to #4 - Fgner (01/22/2013) [-]
On top of that, with modern society being so massively diverse, it's impossible for us to continue the "general education" for so long. We'll need to start educational specialization sooner in our youth's lives. There will be more and more information with just as much time to cover all of it, and we just won't be able to keep up.

Thus, teaching concepts and intellectual thinking is a better use of time than teaching them specific formulas. Formulas can be easily deducted or learned if a concept is mastered, the opposite is not true. No real life job will ever require knowledge of anything but concepts. Programming is a great example. You can show someone how to write a quicksort easily, but it's totally useless if they have no idea how to write anything else. Thus, most comp sci majors only have a couple classes that focus on programming itself, and the rest talk about concepts and theories.
User avatar #23 to #9 - collegedood (01/22/2013) [-]
isnt that what china does? says:"you show promise in math in 6th grade, you become scientist" or "you dont pay attention, you graduate school early to enter general workforce". which i dont agree with since i would have become a manual laborer at the end of 8th grade. become a certified welder at the end of 12th grade. and right now im in college double majoring in engineering and math plus a minor in computer science.

long story short, i prefer the way general education is instead of specializing early on.
User avatar #94 to #23 - Fgner (01/23/2013) [-]
Who said anything about becoming like China? How did you manage to turn my comment saying we should focus on making education better by learning to specialize in fields sooner in life and making sure we teach people how to learn and how to think rather than how to memorize things that we'll never need memorized... into me promoting obviously wrong practices like China does?

My point was that there is too much knowledge out there now. General education has worked thus far, and I never said it was BAD. I just said it's not feasible for it to continue on in it's current form for long. I've seen children (no smarter or more ****** than I was at their age) do amazing things because of the resources they have at their fingertips. They learned what they wanted to do because they had the entire world in their computers to explore, and started specializing their education as much as they could for those fields. They aren't any more special or intelligent than the average kid to be honest other than being more motivated. The information age changes so much, but we seem blind to the fact that it might be able to change our system of education radically as well.
User avatar #99 to #94 - collegedood (01/23/2013) [-]
i compared what you are saying to what china is doing. they start their specialized schooling at 14 which arent mandatory. i then used myself as an example because at the age of 14 i had no idea what i wanted to do (which if my parents didnt have enough money i would get an entry level job), and i didnt find what i wanted to do after two years of college. im not saying you have the wrong idea but i cant agree with specializing children at a young age.
User avatar #101 to #99 - Fgner (01/23/2013) [-]
I'm just going off my experience, YMMV. But I knew I wanted to be a software engineer at aroung 15. At that time, most of my friends figured out what they wanted to do in life (realistically). And almost all of them have stuck to their guns about their fields. But I taught myself so much because it wasn't until my 3rd year of college that they finally start letting my pick classes associated with my major, and I still had to start at the introductory courses. Pretty much all of my know how had to be self taught because the general education system failed me completely (I got good grades, but no knowledge).
User avatar #51 to #23 - toosexyforyou (01/23/2013) [-]
What kind of engineering? I was thinking of double majoring in mechanical and aerospace or just get a masters in mechanical and come back later for aerospace.
User avatar #91 to #51 - collegedood (01/23/2013) [-]
Industrial engineering. right now that is more of a back up degree if i cant find a job with math.

mechanical is rewarding if you are passionate about it. a lot of freshman come here for mechanical then drop out because they want an engineers pay without the work.
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