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User avatar #4 - billybobjoeii (01/11/2013) [-]
Since the previous two comments did not do a suitable job, allow me to clarify:

Gandalf does not have Eagle summoning powers. The eagles saw a fight was going on and wanted a part in it. They then proceed to take Gandalf and gang to the Eagle's nest, where Gandalf then talks to the Eagle king to see where he will drop them off.

It is here we see another thing many people commonly think:

The King Eagle tells Gandalf that they will not take the party any further than where they end up dropping them off because it is too dangerous for them to proceed any further (hence why they don't fly Frodo over Mount Doom).

As for picking Frodo up from Mount Doom (and their fight with the Nazgul in the final battle in Return of the King), they were ordered there by their Master, the (at that time) greatest of the Valar, Manwe.
#45 to #4 - wudup (01/12/2013) [-]
Granted, Gandalf CAN call on the eagles when he needs help, as he saved their leader from poison a long time ago and they are thus willing to aid him when he needs it.
User avatar #122 to #45 - billybobjoeii (01/12/2013) [-]
If I can recall correctly, the eagles that appear in the hobbit had no previous correlation with Gandalf other than the "King Eagle" being the son of Thorondor, the first King of the Eagles.
User avatar #34 to #4 - shazmothree (01/12/2013) [-]
Valar? I'm guessing this is information from the books written by Tolkein's son
#40 to #34 - diroccodoodleedoo (01/12/2013) [-]
No, the Valar are from the Sillmarillion, the book Tolkien wrote concerning the entire history of the world of the Lord of the Rings (AKA Arda) up until the fall of Numenor (basically LOTR Atlantis). The Valar are basically the 'gods' of the world, although they are only servants of the one god, Eru Illuvatar. Characters like Gandalf, Saruman, and even Sauron and Balrogs are actually angelic beings called Maiar, which are basically subordinate Valar (read: angels). Sauron, Balrogs, and most other evil Maiar were corrupted by the rouge Valar, Morgoth, (aka Melko, Melkoth, Bauglir) who is basically the devil.    
   
If you are interested, I highly recommend reading the Sillmarillion, but caveat emptor, 						******					 denser than week old fruitcake and is basically a History textbook with only a few actual narratives in it. Although, there are a couple of great stories in it, such as the Tale of Beren and Luthien.
No, the Valar are from the Sillmarillion, the book Tolkien wrote concerning the entire history of the world of the Lord of the Rings (AKA Arda) up until the fall of Numenor (basically LOTR Atlantis). The Valar are basically the 'gods' of the world, although they are only servants of the one god, Eru Illuvatar. Characters like Gandalf, Saruman, and even Sauron and Balrogs are actually angelic beings called Maiar, which are basically subordinate Valar (read: angels). Sauron, Balrogs, and most other evil Maiar were corrupted by the rouge Valar, Morgoth, (aka Melko, Melkoth, Bauglir) who is basically the devil.

If you are interested, I highly recommend reading the Sillmarillion, but caveat emptor, ****** denser than week old fruitcake and is basically a History textbook with only a few actual narratives in it. Although, there are a couple of great stories in it, such as the Tale of Beren and Luthien.
User avatar #36 to #34 - lorddrake (01/12/2013) [-]
It's actually more of a bundle of all the small stories and mythology that Tolkien wrote over the years. His son finished the work by linking then one to another and filling the gaps. The book resulting is called the Silmarillion.

(could be wrong here)
User avatar #120 to #36 - billybobjoeii (01/12/2013) [-]
No, the Silmarillion was the first book started, and the book near completion when Tolkien died. He intended it to be the complete tale, and 95% of the book was written by him, and the other 5% was organized and completed using Tolkiens notes (sometimes he had 3 or 4 possible scenarios over the same story).

And it really isn't a history, it's just the story of the Silmarils, and the events thereafter, hence Quenta Silmarillion (the main portion of the book). The rest is just background and foreground info.
User avatar #37 to #36 - shazmothree (01/12/2013) [-]
So lets say I want to read what took place before the Hobbit in chronological order, what would I read first?
User avatar #39 to #37 - lorddrake (01/12/2013) [-]
You should read that book.
The Hobbit and The lord of the Rings are telling the story of the 3rd age.
The Silmarillion is telling the story of the 1st and 2nd ages. So yea, it's kind of the beginning. If you really like the Tolkien universe, read it.

I warn you tho, the writing is pretty different from The Hobbit or LOTR, more complex, more mythological.
And the last quarter of the book is almost un-readable, mostly talking about how this guy is the son of this guy and who gave birth to what line of warriors that lived under this one magic city, etc...
User avatar #24 to #4 - turboderp (01/12/2013) [-]
eh.. didn't he talk to some butterflies, and they went and called for the eagles? I might be wrong, that's just how I got it..
User avatar #26 to #24 - Nullifier (01/12/2013) [-]
Thats some BS they invented in the movies, there are no butterflies..
User avatar #121 to #26 - billybobjoeii (01/12/2013) [-]
Actually there were, with one minor correction; it was a moth.
User avatar #144 to #121 - Nullifier (01/12/2013) [-]
They were used more by Radagast, though, who doesn't even appear in the movies as communicating with Gwaihir.
User avatar #27 to #26 - turboderp (01/12/2013) [-]
Oh.. Well, I have only watch'd the movies so I guess I don't kno **** :s

Started reading the hobbit in christmas, but then school started and haven't have too much time reading.. Probably will do in next vacation ^^ Easter probably! :D

(I do thehobbit, then the three LOTR books if I have time)
User avatar #31 to #27 - Nullifier (01/12/2013) [-]
They're tough reads, speaking as an avid reader myself. The vocabulary is "challenging" but mostly it's just that Tolkien goes onnnnnnnn and oooooooonnnnnnnnnnnnnn about certain things
User avatar #14 to #4 - kensislayer (01/12/2013) [-]
I thought the king of he eagles owed gandalf because he saved their king from a poisoned arrow
User avatar #5 to #4 - padrerebelscumole (01/11/2013) [-]
Isn't the brown wizard the summoner of the eagles?
User avatar #6 to #5 - billybobjoeii (01/11/2013) [-]
No. No one "summons" the eagles.
User avatar #13 to #6 - satrenkotheone (01/12/2013) [-]
But I wanted to be summoner of the eagles...
User avatar #7 to #6 - padrerebelscumole (01/11/2013) [-]
When Gandalf is kept prisoner on Sarumans Castle roof the eagle was sent by the brown wizard.
#9 to #7 - devout feminist (01/11/2013) [-]
Think you are right seeing how Gandalf was "speaking" to a moth before the eagles arrived.
User avatar #12 to #9 - billybobjoeii (01/12/2013) [-]
Tolkien's world is not ours, some animals speak in that world (though not any tongue commonly known), and he is a wizard, after all. So him speaking to a moth isn't too far fetched.
#18 to #12 - applescryatnight (01/12/2013) [-]
gandalf has wizard ears too
User avatar #8 to #7 - billybobjoeii (01/11/2013) [-]
No, Gandalf captures and sends a moth to go and ask the Eagles to come rescue him. An eagle named Gwaihir ends up doing so.

It might also be fair to note Gwaihir also took Gandalf's body from Zirak-Zigil (the place where he fought and killed the Balrog).
User avatar #15 to #8 - padrerebelscumole (01/12/2013) [-]
It appears to be a You need to login to view this link to the moth doesn't exist to the books.
lotr.wikia.com/wiki/The_Moth under controversy
User avatar #123 to #15 - billybobjoeii (01/12/2013) [-]
Huh. Must not remember that portion.... UGHAKLJ:AFKLMK

READING TIME!
User avatar #10 to #8 - blarglestheclown (01/12/2013) [-]
you know your lore sir.
User avatar #11 to #10 - billybobjoeii (01/12/2013) [-]
Haha, I love Tolkien.
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