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User avatar #73 - dairybun (12/02/2012) [-]
It's mad to think, even though comparatively the Hiroshima bomb was small compared to later developments in warfare, it still destroyed an entire city. There was a maximum temperature at burst point of around several million degrees centigrade. A fireball of 15-meters radius formed in 0.1 milliseconds, with a temperature of 300,000 degrees centigrade, and it then expanded to its huge maximum size in one second. The top of the atomic cloud reached an altitude of 17,000 meters. The estimated pre-bomb population was 300,000 to 400,000. Because official documents were burned, the exact population is uncertain.
Deaths - With an uncertain population figure, the death toll could only be estimated. The death count reached 140,000 (plus or minus 10,000) by the end of December, 1945.
#109 to #73 - anisbanana (12/02/2012) [-]
The Tzar bomb left 3rd degree burns at more than 100km away! while the atomic bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima had an effective range of a mere 7 miles. But now physicists studied and concluded that the nuke used only .1% of its respective explosive capabilities, and could have caused far more damage. The Tzar bomb was 57 megatons (57,000,000 tons of TNT) If this was the weight of the nuke, (which would be impossible due to the fact there is only about 15.5 megatons of uranium left on earth) it could have destroyed 1/8 of china.
User avatar #137 to #109 - sterlingarcher (12/02/2012) [-]
Correct me if wrong, but the H bomb (tzar bomb) was by fusion, not fission. In fact, Hydrogen was used instead of uranium. Although, I think fission was used to detonate it, not sure. but I know the main element was hydrogen
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#176 to #137 - doomfish has deleted their comment [-]
#258 to #176 - swagbot (12/02/2012) [-]
Bro, are you ******* kidding me?

Read: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H-bomb
User avatar #548 to #258 - sterlingarcher (12/03/2012) [-]
Literally what I just said. That An H bomb is set off by Fission, but is a fusion bomb using hydrogen.
#551 to #548 - swagbot (12/03/2012) [-]
Bro, look at the reply hierarchy.

You were right (hence your +1... that was me), and Captain Dumbass (heretofore knows as 'Doomfish') proclaimed that 'i wasn't aware we knew how to harness fusion', a statement so incredibly foolish i had to bathe him in the putrescent waters of knowledge. K?
User avatar #565 to #551 - sterlingarcher (12/03/2012) [-]
Sorry, man. The lines confuse me haha
User avatar #234 to #176 - fgtometer (12/02/2012) [-]
Not in controlled reactions (for power production) but for bombs, yep. Since the '50s as far as I know. Tsar Bomba was indeed a H-bomb, detonated using a small fission bomb
User avatar #549 to #234 - sterlingarcher (12/03/2012) [-]
A fissiom bomb triggered the hydrogen to fuse together creating helium.
User avatar #554 to #549 - fgtometer (12/03/2012) [-]
Yeah, that's what I said...
User avatar #566 to #554 - sterlingarcher (12/03/2012) [-]
Sorry about that, was just confused.
#117 to #109 - lastofthedovakhiin (12/02/2012) [-]
Wouldn't you be able to create Uranium in the near future with thermonuclear-fusion? I mean I know it only happens on the sun but a mere bolt of lightning from the sky is ten times hotter than the surface of the sun. Surely we can create artificial uranium. If not, we can resort to E99!
#132 to #117 - anisbanana (12/02/2012) [-]
Oh, and doesnt the tesla coil pretty much simulate lightning? By ionizing the air, we can aim the direction of the lightning current.
User avatar #140 to #132 - lastofthedovakhiin (12/02/2012) [-]
By god, we could!
#131 to #117 - anisbanana (12/02/2012) [-]
Highly unlikely. There is no substance known to man that would be able to sustain such intense heat. Titanium melts at 1,700 C, and the surface of the sun is a mere 5000 degrees C, not that much greater, carbon melts at 3.5 thousand celcius. We only have about 230 years left of nuclear power if we continue to use power at our current rate.
User avatar #77 to #73 - copyhat (12/02/2012) [-]
The fireball can't spread itself faster than the speed of sound - about 1100 km/h depending on the air pressure.
User avatar #75 to #73 - freestyleristaken (12/02/2012) [-]
centigrade? who says that nowadays :D I thought everyone used Celsius.
User avatar #571 to #75 - mentlgen (12/19/2012) [-]
They said this:

You said centigrade? Who says that? I thought we used Celsius.
User avatar #573 to #571 - freestyleristaken (12/22/2012) [-]
What I meant was that I rarely hear people use it, funny how every1 jumped on some kind of bandwagon of ignorance. :) I am not mad at them, they can't help it.
#130 to #75 - deadinferno (12/02/2012) [-]
Oh good lord...
#116 to #75 - anisbanana (12/02/2012) [-]
I apologize for the stupid, unintelligent community of funnyjunk, apparently we are the only educated humanoids on here...
#118 to #113 - anisbanana (12/02/2012) [-]
Anders Celsius was the 18th century physicist who invented the centigrade scale. He called his temperature scale "centigrade" as he divided the interval between the boiling and freezing points of water into 100 steps(centi=hundred). In the 20th century, it was decided that the centi- prefix should be reserved for indicating 1/100 of something(eg a centimeter is 0,01 meter, a centiliter is 0,01 liter and so on). In order to avoid confusion, it was decided that the centigrade scale had to change names, and it was renamed after its inventor. In other words, the centigrade scale is simply an older name of the Celsius scale.
#110 to #75 - alstorp (12/02/2012) [-]
HAHAHAHA OOOH GOD
HAHAHAHA OOOH GOD
#119 to #110 - anisbanana (12/02/2012) [-]
Anders Celsius was the 18th century physicist who invented the centigrade scale. He called his temperature scale "centigrade" as he divided the interval between the boiling and freezing points of water into 100 steps(centi=hundred). In the 20th century, it was decided that the centi- prefix should be reserved for indicating 1/100 of something(eg a centimeter is 0,01 meter, a centiliter is 0,01 liter and so on). In order to avoid confusion, it was decided that the centigrade scale had to change names, and it was renamed after its inventor. In other words, the centigrade scale is simply an older name of the Celsius scale.
User avatar #103 to #75 - arjunz (12/02/2012) [-]
www.thefreedictionary.com/centigrade

Don't feel bad, one who holds many red thumbs. FJ users just do their best to remember the good ol' days before Martin Luther King Jr. was born.
#123 to #103 - anisbanana (12/02/2012) [-]
Anders Celsius was the 18th century physicist who invented the centigrade scale. He called his temperature scale "centigrade" as he divided the interval between the boiling and freezing points of water into 100 steps(centi=hundred). In the 20th century, it was decided that the centi- prefix should be reserved for indicating 1/100 of something(eg a centimeter is 0,01 meter, a centiliter is 0,01 liter and so on). In order to avoid confusion, it was decided that the centigrade scale had to change names, and it was renamed after its inventor. In other words, the centigrade scale is simply an older name of the Celsius scale.
User avatar #107 to #103 - arjunz (12/02/2012) [-]
Also in defense of this random stranger, it appears that they were saying that no one uses the term "centigrade" in today's world, and everyone says "Celsius" instead. It does not seem that he believed they were two different scales or other entities.
User avatar #569 to #107 - freestyleristaken (12/04/2012) [-]
this is what I meant :) I don't really care for the people who start calling people stupid instantly because they interpret something differently than the author meant it.
#100 to #75 - hxhostile (12/02/2012) [-]
Please be joking.
#135 to #100 - anisbanana (12/02/2012) [-]
In a kindly matter, please explain to me what the difference is between centigrade and celcius. All the research I have done concludes that centigrade and celcius is the same. Centigrade was the older name for celcius.
#172 to #135 - xxxsonic fanxxx (12/02/2012) [-]
Exactly, they mean the same thing.
In other words he was nitpicking, and nobody likes a nitpicker.
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#114 to #100 - anisbanana has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #122 to #114 - hxhostile (12/02/2012) [-]
The people of FJ have spoken accept your red thumb thrashing with dignity.
#126 to #122 - anisbanana (12/02/2012) [-]
You still didnt answer my ******* question. EXACTLY.
#136 to #81 - anisbanana (12/02/2012) [-]
In a kindly matter, please explain to me what the difference is between centigrade and celcius. All the research I have done concludes that centigrade and celcius is the same. Centigrade was the older name for celcius.
User avatar #556 to #136 - bitchplzzz (12/03/2012) [-]
Woah, why are all these people sooo mad? You made an easy mistake. Celcius is more exact. Centigrade is on the same temperature on 0 as celcius, but changes slowly as the number rises.
User avatar #572 to #556 - freestyleristaken (12/22/2012) [-]
They were raging at me for wondering why he said centigrade because I barely ever hear that term being used. They thought something else.
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