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#10 - haaaxderp (06/08/2012) [-]
That's one of the many different Autism Awareness symbols.

Only pic I had that's related to Autism.
If anyone has any questions about Autism, ask me, I have a severly autistic and mentally retarded older brother.
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#74 to #10 - faridthebang **User deleted account** has deleted their comment [-]
#190 to #74 - paradoxfag (06/08/2012) [-]
Why did you direct that to the poster who clearly just said he isn't the one with autism?

Who's the real mentally challenged one.
#161 to #74 - anonymous (06/08/2012) [-]
What a douche. Grow up.
User avatar #82 to #74 - pokemonstheshiz (06/08/2012) [-]
I don't think you know what autism is...
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#202 to #82 - faridthebang **User deleted account** has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #203 to #202 - pokemonstheshiz (06/09/2012) [-]
just think about things before you post them, or you'll find yourself in the red thumb sea
#41 to #10 - pandadiablo (06/08/2012) [-]
Are autistic people good at math or remembering specific things?
#59 to #41 - paradoxfag (06/08/2012) [-]
I actually have autism, so I can answer questions too I suppose.   
   
It depends on the type of autism. It varies. There's high-functioning autism, also known as Aspergers Syndrome (The variant I have) and is defined by having a higher IQ.   
   
Personally speaking, yes, I am good at maths, but only in a core form. I'd run rings around anyone in adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing and tbh, anything else that I've learned to do in maths (generally speaking). But I struggle greatly with more open ended equations, I take into account every single possibility, I can't see the simple bigger picture. This impairs me greatly and prevents me from keeping up with your average class honestly speaking.    
   
At remembering specific things? Well, I can't speak for every autistic, but my memory is rather bad. Short term and long-term. I have ADD as well, attention deficit. This means I rarely take in everything someone says, and it's difficult for me to pay full attention so it's rarely contained in my head. If you called out 5 numbers and 5 letters in a totally random order, I could recite em back to you alphabetically and numerically with ease. But if i'm not concentrating on it, chances are i'll forget it.   
   
May I extend this already long-winded post to emphasise my variety of autism is on a completely different playing field to the posters brother above me. He has a severely impaired form of autism including many language, learning and social difficulties. My variant does not include language impairments nor would my symptoms be as harsh.   
   
There's your tl;dr for today guys, any questions you know who'll get there in a round-a-bout fashion! (Y) Now here's a gif that's almost as long.
I actually have autism, so I can answer questions too I suppose.

It depends on the type of autism. It varies. There's high-functioning autism, also known as Aspergers Syndrome (The variant I have) and is defined by having a higher IQ.

Personally speaking, yes, I am good at maths, but only in a core form. I'd run rings around anyone in adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing and tbh, anything else that I've learned to do in maths (generally speaking). But I struggle greatly with more open ended equations, I take into account every single possibility, I can't see the simple bigger picture. This impairs me greatly and prevents me from keeping up with your average class honestly speaking.

At remembering specific things? Well, I can't speak for every autistic, but my memory is rather bad. Short term and long-term. I have ADD as well, attention deficit. This means I rarely take in everything someone says, and it's difficult for me to pay full attention so it's rarely contained in my head. If you called out 5 numbers and 5 letters in a totally random order, I could recite em back to you alphabetically and numerically with ease. But if i'm not concentrating on it, chances are i'll forget it.

May I extend this already long-winded post to emphasise my variety of autism is on a completely different playing field to the posters brother above me. He has a severely impaired form of autism including many language, learning and social difficulties. My variant does not include language impairments nor would my symptoms be as harsh.

There's your tl;dr for today guys, any questions you know who'll get there in a round-a-bout fashion! (Y) Now here's a gif that's almost as long.
User avatar #114 to #59 - kjeks (06/08/2012) [-]
Just curious, how about your emotions? Are you oversensitive or not sensitive at all? Emotionally oblivious? Anything like that?
#193 to #114 - paradoxfag (06/08/2012) [-]
I'm just going to clear this up first, so I can explain things easier. Autism, is usually highly debilitating in many aspects, and includes many impairing effects.
Aspergers (which IS autism, but merely a FORM of autism) would be considered a mild strain of straight-up autism, as the symptoms aren't as glaringly obvious.

Ok, so emotions. I can't speak great for someone with autism, but their emotions would generally be quite rampant, ranging from screaming at a simple "Hello" to not responding to anything whatsoever. They usually go in and out of moods, like a baby, perhaps, they have fits of rage and confusion and their world is quite distorted in comparison to an NT's (Neurotypical human being (Your average human) Double brackets ftw). This means that they often need a caretaker, like our dear poster above us has outlined.

In my case, with Aspergers (A much more common form of autism) my emotions can vary. There's certain triggers that send me off into a maniacal fit of rage. My only trigger really is if someone unprovokedly verbally or physically attacks me or anyone else. This seriously sets me off and is the root of all my anger. In general terms however, my emotions are quite balanced. I think where this stereotype that comes with being emotionally oblivious comes from the fact that I have severe lack of empathy. I can't see things in another persons shoes in most cases. When I see a big disaster, something insanely distressing or grotesque, I don't feel anything. Whatsoever. When my grandmother who's close to me died, I didn't feel anything and I was unsure whether I was supposed to or not. This could answer your "emotionally oblivious" question. Also, on a similar note, I can stop caring for someone in an instant, and never look back. All of these symptoms may point to me being "cold" or "heartless" but it's just the way I am really, call it what you will.

I would right more but i'm about to hit char limit. Any more questions don't be afraid guys :) (Y)
#205 to #193 - kjeks (06/10/2012) [-]
Thanks man, that explains a lot.
Thanks man, that explains a lot.
User avatar #198 to #193 - haaaxderp (06/08/2012) [-]
This is where the term "Tard Rage" comes from, because people with Autism, of all spectrums usually have some sort of thing that triggers a vast quantity of rage, amiright?
User avatar #200 to #198 - paradoxfag (06/08/2012) [-]
I've never heard that phrase before. But I guess its plausible. Im certain not every autistic has such a thing though.
#92 to #59 - pandadiablo (06/08/2012) [-]
Wow. That was actually very informative. Thanks for that.   
Here's a gif in return.
Wow. That was actually very informative. Thanks for that.
Here's a gif in return.
#37 to #10 - sahakid (06/08/2012) [-]
...I should be too young to get this reference, but I'm not
#36 to #10 - manymanymangoes (06/08/2012) [-]
... ... .. ... .. ... .. ... ..I... I have no suitable words...
#34 to #10 - redrummurder (06/08/2012) [-]
How do you make them run real fast into a wall?
User avatar #199 to #34 - haaaxderp (06/08/2012) [-]
You push them.
#30 to #10 - kitsunemochalite (06/08/2012) [-]
So I'm not even real at being imaginary?
So I'm not even real at being imaginary?
#25 to #10 - jjholt (06/08/2012) [-]
My question:
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