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#41 - gobnick
Reply +2
(05/23/2013) [-]
this never made sense to me. as far as i know, all influence on physics is even lower in space. thus wouldn't that mean that his initial throw, if uninhibited, would travel on for as long as it has a clear vector? and if it did indeed encounter an obstacle, wouldn't the effect of the baseball bouncing be just the same? in fact, wouldn't this mean that the rebound itself (after reducing speed from impact of course) would mirror that of the trajectory of the initial throw? a constant speed in one vector as long as it's uninhibited?
(basically i'm saying, it doesn't make sense to me that the ball slowed down nearly that much)
#134 to #41 - Korosia
Reply 0
(05/23/2013) [-]
An object only rebounds with the same momentum (ie, speed) if the collision is perfectly elastic. As far as I'm aware (I'm from England so I don't know much about baseballs), baseballs are pretty hard - that is, they don't bounce very well. On Earth, if you throw a tennis ball or a rubber bouncy ball at a wall, it will bounce back into your hands. But I imagine a baseball would just hit the wall and stop - like if you threw an apple at a wall or something. In space, once it's hit the wall most of it's energy has gone, but it can't fall downwards so it will just slowly drift back to you.
#143 to #134 - gobnick
Reply 0
(05/23/2013) [-]
actually a baseball has many layers of yarn and string before a rubber ball core, they actually bounce decently, and in this scene archer was trying to do what Steve McQueen did in the movie The Great Escape, when he was thrown in the "cooler" (the detention cell in a pow camp), his character would bring a baseball and mitt and bounce the ball off the wall as his entertainment or as something to pass the time
#52 to #41 - MuffinMan
Reply +1
(05/23/2013) [-]
"All influence on physics is even lower in space"?
#54 to #52 - gobnick
Reply 0
(05/23/2013) [-]
sorry, earthbound influence i should say, or earthbound physics somewhat for that matter too
#51 to #41 - rangerofthesea
Reply +1
(05/23/2013) [-]
the materials generally used inside of a spaceship is a plastic type of support...because any metal that doesnt have oxygen will spot weld to other metal...so maybe the thing has some elasticity and soaked up some of the momentum yes?
#45 to #41 - rdowg
Reply -1
(05/23/2013) [-]
well that would be in the vaccume of space, not just in zero g, since there is air inside of the room to cause friction, and maybe the wall absorbed some impact   
and if you don't agree   
you're in   
   
the dangerrrr zoooonnneeee
well that would be in the vaccume of space, not just in zero g, since there is air inside of the room to cause friction, and maybe the wall absorbed some impact
and if you don't agree
you're in

the dangerrrr zoooonnneeee
#47 to #45 - Zarke
Reply +2
(05/23/2013) [-]
If the air was thick enough to slow down a ball that much, I have a feeling a slow ball is the least of his concerns.
#46 to #45 - gobnick
Reply +3
(05/23/2013) [-]
"Lana....Lana!....LANA!.....LANAAAA!!!!"
"WHAT!?"
"hehe, danger zone"
#64 to #46 - gamerfan
Reply +6
(05/23/2013) [-]
here take this
here take this
#93 to #64 - gobnick
Reply 0
(05/23/2013) [-]
thank you sir, and frankly i'm surprised i got it pretty much exactly right in the quoting