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What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
#367 - gorogorosama (07/04/2014) [+] (2 replies)
I have two questions:   
1) If a a stranger does "kochi" or " shoving fingers deep into your posterior thing" to a woman and she is married, does her husband have to defend her honor?  Challenging him to a duel or punishing him in a certain manner.    
2) What does my username mean?  I heard it in some new TMNT episode  when Michelangelo  pretends he's a superhero. It is suppose to mean "master of thunders or w/e. It could've been mistranslated Thanks!
I have two questions:
1) If a a stranger does "kochi" or " shoving fingers deep into your posterior thing" to a woman and she is married, does her husband have to defend her honor? Challenging him to a duel or punishing him in a certain manner.
2) What does my username mean? I heard it in some new TMNT episode when Michelangelo pretends he's a superhero. It is suppose to mean "master of thunders or w/e. It could've been mistranslated Thanks!
User avatar #368 to #367 - vatra (07/04/2014) [-]
Gorogoro is essentially onomatopoeia for thunder. Sama is an honorific that essentially means higher standing. It is basically san, the standard honorific but with more respect and holding them in high regards.
User avatar #283 - bingleshmink (06/19/2014) [+] (1 reply)
I heard Japan just outlawed child pornography.
User avatar #226 - azraelthemage (06/19/2014) [+] (6 replies)
I've heard that they view the "Peace" sign a little differently than we do here in the states. Someone once told me that they view it the same way we do the "Middle Finger". Is this true? And why is that?

Another question I have is, whenever they make any work of fiction based on a foreign country (I'll use the states as an example), do they really have any idea how things work here? No seriously, in the video game "Catherine", everything about it screams "He lives in a Japanese town", but they pass it off as being set in an American city. Normally, I'd just write it off as bad localization, but that's hard to say when every characters is anything but Japanese. Do they even have a clue as to what other countries' cultures are really like?
#285 to #276 - livefromtokyo (06/19/2014) [-]
Well, the peace sign photo pose could be compared to the tradition of saying "cheese" before a photo (in the Untied States).

Saying "cheese" for a photo tends to make people smile. In Japan, the peace sign has become a visual "cheese" — a cue to the photographer that you're ready for the photo. Like saying cheese — it makes them feel more photogenic somehow.
User avatar #221 - silkisberg (06/19/2014) [+] (4 replies)
*roll image* japan
#247 to #236 - silkisberg (06/19/2014) [-]
**silkisberg rolled image** Been a while..
User avatar #210 - fjusernumberone (06/19/2014) [-]
They hold classes to teach how to bowl properly.....but they bowl very very oddly compared to the rest of the world.

Source: I work for a bowling ball manufacturing company and I've been bowling in leagues for 17 years.
User avatar #132 - exarzero (06/19/2014) [-]
Thank you.
User avatar #94 - mangostormlegend (06/19/2014) [+] (1 reply)
My geography professor went to a conference in Kyoto, and he told us that the street address systems are virtually devoid of any official order or classification. Many suburban residential streets are unnamed (being symply written as "near XXX-street"), postal codes are non-existent, and buildings are often numbered in the order in which they were built. Can you confirm/deny this, bizengaust?
User avatar #96 to #94 - bizengaust (06/19/2014) [-]
This is very true. I met my fiance, who is from Kyoto, here in Osaka when we began teaching in the same building and when we dated long enough for him to want to introduce me to his family he gave me their address in Kyoto. I cannot begin to tell you how lost I got because the address system was so complex. WIkipedia explains it a lot better than I ever could so feel free to read more about it. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_addressing_system I eventually found his family house after arriving two hours late. They forgave me and understood much to my thanks.
#17 - angelusprimus (06/18/2014) [+] (2 replies)
I asked this the last time, so I'm trying again.
Did you have problems for being russian descent? During my visits I noticed that Russians have a very bad reputation for being loud and rude and not following the rules.
User avatar #23 to #17 - bizengaust (06/18/2014) [-]
I'm sorry I meant to work this one in but it got lost in the cracks. When I first came to Japan and they saw on my application that I was Russian-American I was introduced to this stereotype. The funny thing is that in Russia people are very polite. Men carry bags for woman,people give up their seats for the elderly, woman help out around the house,ect. We are also a very stubborn people though and most Russians hate when you try to tell them what to do. I think this is where that notion was birthed from, and the fact that when we party we party loud and have fun.
As long as you respect them and their culture they will be understanding and do the same to you so I don't get treated any different then my other teachers. Except for a few awkward questions about communism but I get that anywhere.
#2 - nwbballplayer (06/18/2014) [-]
Nice comp, pretty interesting.
#340 - karvarausku ONLINE (06/19/2014) [-]
**karvarausku rolled image** 3/10
#268 - indone (06/19/2014) [-]
Japanese culture is going under thanks to their antinatalism.   
   
They'll have to breed with white's in order to form a stronger race.
Japanese culture is going under thanks to their antinatalism.

They'll have to breed with white's in order to form a stronger race.
#217 - russianexplain (06/19/2014) [+] (3 replies)
For a Russian-American, you sure know so much about Japan. Every Russian and Ukrainian I know just don't give a **** about any other country than the one they live in and where they're from.
User avatar #227 to #217 - azraelthemage (06/19/2014) [-]
OP lives there from what I can tell.
#216 - teranin ONLINE (06/19/2014) [+] (3 replies)
All 3 of the former Axis powers (Japan, Germany, Italy) federally allow ephebophilia down to age 14, 13 is legal in some areas. Now, I've also heard that in Japan you are not considered an Adult until age 20.

So... what's the deal with that, Japanese Myth Buster-chan?
#267 to #216 - racistracist ONLINE (06/19/2014) [-]
JEW!
#211 - dontknowmeatall (06/19/2014) [+] (1 reply)
How does the internet work in Japan? Is it the same as western internet? Or is it more like china? And can you torrent, or do you have tot take all your piracy from home?
#185 - crispyfever (06/19/2014) [-]
"On Saturday, Japan lost its first World Cup match with the Ivory Coast by 2-1. While that could have been a demoralizing start for most sports enthusiasts, a bunch of Japanese fans who attended the event at Arena Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil decided to respond with an unbelievably classy move: cleaning up the stadium."

mic.com/articles/91279/japan-fans-did-what-no-other-soccer-fans-would-after-their-world-cup-team-lost
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#182 - bestfoxgirl has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #179 - crispyfever (06/19/2014) [-]
日本でどこに住んでいる?
#140 - Orc (06/19/2014) [-]
**Orc rolled image** What do they call what happened at the end of WW2?
#138 - fefe (06/19/2014) [-]
I would say the while I agree with the majority of the way you've worded your different points- your anime point leaves something to be desired.
Now, I live in Tokyo, so i can't speak for the more rural areas in Japan, but from what I've seen- anime and manga characters are EVERYWHERE. Almost every company has some little character who they use as their mascot. The police station near my house (and police are something that should be taken very seriously in Japan) has statue of astro boy dressed up in a police uniform to welcome. There's a sign on the road near Yoyogi Park that reminds motorcycles to wear a helmet. It's a cartoon of death riding behind a guy saying, "you don't want to see me soon!" These are only examples of very serious matters that I would normal never think to associate cartoons- and yet in Japan- they do. In a professional cooking class(where i was the youngest person by 15 years) we made very popular themed bento boxes. (shown)

Cute characters are everywhere
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