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What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
#352 - xxxsonic fanxxx (06/26/2014) [+] (2 replies)
It's a shame weaboos will deny this and instead think Japan is just like in anime .
User avatar #66 - perform (06/19/2014) [+] (8 replies)
On the topic of formalities, you'll often see the Japanese address each other by their last name and then a suffix.

Suffixes:
-san: This is the more commonly used one among two strangers, usually following their last name and on occasion, their first name. This is the equivalent of Mister, Miss or Misses

-kun: This is used more among respected peers and follows their last or first name depending on how familiar they are and preferences. It's not as formal as strangers, but not as familiar as best buddies. Think of the relationship as a mutual friend who you've talked to on several occasions.

-chan: This usually follows the last or first name, once again based on preferences and/or familiarity. This is used when the recipient of the message is supposed to be cuter or wanting attention. For example, you'd use this on somebody's 6 year old sister. This is seldom used on males.

-sama: This is used to address someone very high up only following their last name. This is often used in hierarchies where there is a distinguishable leader who demands a lot of respect and praise from his/her peers.

-lack of prefix: This is reserved only for very personal and familiar friends/people. On occasion, it would be the last name, but very commonly their first name. This would mainly be used by your best friends, familly and/or coworkers.
#289 - xxxsonic fanxxx (06/19/2014) [+] (2 replies)
Don't want to be that guy, but it's irritating me.

It's not "They can speak English very good", it's "They can speak English very well.
#246 - tharoon (06/19/2014) [+] (3 replies)
I am from Japan and we love Americans.
Thank you again masters for giving us two gifts from the sky. A-bombs you ばか
We are still breathing the sweet air from them.
Sometimes it hurts.

真珠湾を祝う
User avatar #102 - independantnight (06/19/2014) [+] (2 replies)
Since your next compilation seems to be geared towards food, could you shed some light on this for me?
In the U.S. Sushi has become very popular in recent years, but as always it has become very 'Americanized', and we see a lot of variations. Here Rolls are the most popular Sushi, and often what people think of first upon hearing the word, (the Posterchild if you will).
I happen to know that Nigiri, (I don't know the Japanese characters) is 'proper' traditional Sushi, originating in Edo and whatnot, and what I would like to know is if rolls hold a similar significance in Japan as they do in the Americas?
Also, I have read that Sushi actually refers specifically to the rice, is this how the word is used in Japan regularly?
User avatar #106 to #102 - bizengaust (06/19/2014) [-]
I'll totally be addressing this in my next comp : ).
#58 - worldofwarcraftdog ONLINE (06/19/2014) [-]
i like this
#50 - xxxsonic fanxxx (06/19/2014) [+] (2 replies)
9) They can speak English very good.
*well
User avatar #254 - olias (06/19/2014) [+] (1 reply)
I grew up in northern Japan. This makes me happy. Especially the one about anime. I get a little irritated at weaboos who think they will be able to just jet off to Japan and be accepted with open arms.


Nope, you'd be a weird weaboo over there too.
#207 - freegzuz (06/19/2014) [+] (2 replies)
>op
#187 - lxaje (06/19/2014) [+] (8 replies)
Okay, so as this is a comp. about Japan, I feel this might be a good place to vent my feelings about the place.
I've been living here for close to a year now as a high school exchange student, and I've found a lot of things about the culture that really "rustles my jimmies", so to speak. Mind you, a majority of these things apply to high school and the younger generation, so you older がいじん's might not have had the same experiences.
1) They live for work/ school.
- I mean they seriously have no interests outside of their workplace or schoolgrounds. Way to often have I suggested going to a cafe or heading for the shopping districts to some of my classmates, but it's almost always met with either, "sorry, have club activities", "sorry, EC activities today" or "sorry, have homework". And some of you are probably thinking "well hey, good thing they've got something they like doing, instead of ending up on the internet like us" but a lot of them get forced into clubs they don't like due to peer pressure. Anyone who's not in a club is seen as a deliquent student, and usually ends up as an outcast altogether.
(cont. in another comment, this'll be long)
#176 - copycopy ONLINE (06/19/2014) [-]
Comment Picture
#148 - owemiegawd (06/19/2014) [+] (5 replies)
Bizengaust, i plan on moving to Kyoto in the following year, and im curious as to how much it costs to live their? and how hard is it to get a job? is there homesteads there where i can rent just a room but have access to a kitchen/bathroom?
Bizengaust, i plan on moving to Kyoto in the following year, and im curious as to how much it costs to live their? and how hard is it to get a job? is there homesteads there where i can rent just a room but have access to a kitchen/bathroom?
User avatar #115 - superanonymouspers ONLINE (06/19/2014) [+] (2 replies)
I want to thank you again for putting up this comp, as I said in the last comp, I've been very interested in learning about the japanese culture. I've been very curious to visit/live there for quite some time.

Here's a question, ever since learning about the japanese hornet, I've been... well, TERRIFIED of it. How common are they?
User avatar #97 - zomaru ONLINE (06/19/2014) [+] (1 reply)
I had a theory that that Otako came from how restrictive Japanese families might be compared to modern day. How they hold such a tight leash as to what is considered normal, that when someone escapes those bonds they go balls deep.
Might be kind of what you are describing. But that's just the observations of what I have seen of Japanese culture. Differing from American in that such a wide range of things are accepted as normal.
#297 - ironsoul ONLINE (06/19/2014) [+] (5 replies)
Got any advice for somebody who just wants to visit the country for a little bit? Not moving there or anything, I just think it would be cool to visit. I don't speak the language.
Got any advice for somebody who just wants to visit the country for a little bit? Not moving there or anything, I just think it would be cool to visit. I don't speak the language.
#240 - steppenwolfvg (06/19/2014) [-]
"They would rather die than bring shame or dishonor to famiry."

But what's with the weird commercials and TV shows?
User avatar #213 - megatrollinator (06/19/2014) [-]
The Japanese word for Surrender is 降伏 (Kōfuku)
#205 - xxxsonic fanxxx (06/19/2014) [-]
A few interesting things though:

- They are not very polite against gays.
- Outside the (big) cities on the countrysides, most of them do not like foreigners living there close to them.
- Lots of them actually think that every western or american girls are obsessed by sex.
#204 - pitifulsoul (06/19/2014) [-]
I had a Japanese girlfriend (who grew up in Japan). To make it better, she was a rising model studying to become a seiyuu (VA, or voice actor). Apparently people go to take college classes for that... I knew they took voice acting seriously, but it's still a bit surprising... A lot of the stuff from these comps are generally the same responses she gave me when I asked her about stereotypes. We were planning on getting married, and her parents were very supportive of us, but... She died from the flu very shortly after that
User avatar #80 - VincentKing ONLINE (06/19/2014) [+] (6 replies)
I forgot all about part 1, and now it looks like it was deleted
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