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#35 - crazyolitis
Reply +5
(07/25/2013) [-]
How about this ************? Goddamnded gandhi, Gandh of war.
#29 - zomaru
Reply +5
(07/25/2013) [-]
I prefer Civ V. Just play it safe and peaceful and put all your money towards production and research. Then, when you get nukes, THE WORLD SHALL PAY!!!
#32 to #29 - minecraftlamer
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
take napoleon win on diplomacy thats my choise of style xD
#158 - infinitereaper
Reply +3
(07/25/2013) [-]
Oh boy.

>Just got the Brave New World expansion for Civ V.
>Playing Emperor Mode.
>I'm Reaper of the Infinite Empire
>Powers of ************* glorious Blood Red Poland
>Things are going well, took my first capital.
>Russia: "I cannot win but I will declare war!"
>Pedro II: "Time to declare war bitch, I'll find some way to kill you."
>Portugal Bitch: "You're dead kiddo, somehow."
>I'm like "Okay. You guys have half my game score, so I'll be fine."
>Alexander: "THE TIME TO DIE IS NOW BITCH."
>Total War
>****.
#155 - mysticpichu
Reply +3
(07/25/2013) [-]
my latest game is Indonesia on a large fractal map. the good thing for me is, I got spawned on a huge island with a **** ton of resources and two natural wonders. the rest of the civs are all on one continent. All I'm doing is building cities on other small islands, keeping would be invaders at bay with my huge navy, and watching the other civs slowely kill each other.

basically I'm winning by doing nothing.
#90 - rakaka
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
>tfw you can't play civ V and you're not good at civ IV
#92 to #90 - DeathOne
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
Heh, well, I am not very good at Civ IV either (I can resist on noble, but not strong enough to be able to achieve victory), and I played quite a lot of Civ V... and yeah, it is a fun game, tho it's very different, dumbed down, and without the DLCs, it's worse than Civ IV.
#124 to #92 - verby
Reply +3
(07/25/2013) [-]
Being able to win on Warlord means that you are in fact very god at Civ. The only way to get good enough for noble is to play a lot more games than most people care to
#148 to #124 - DeathOne
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
Tell that to my Steam friend who plays on immortal and enjoys teasing me by calling me a filthy casual.
#97 to #92 - rakaka
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
This made me feel even more because i can't even win on settler
#108 to #97 - DeathOne
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
You can't win on Settler?
Want me to teach ya a couple of things? By the time we're done, you should be able to win on Warlord, which is a step below Noble
#110 to #108 - rakaka
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
I would enjoy that. One time the russian empire was next to mine and i decided to make war with them because they looked weak and had some good land. I made preperations; moving units into their borders and around my cities. Once i declared war i lost the units in their territory and literally all the other civs declared war on me. I quit and deleted the save because of the shame.

Pic related it was the japanese empire's FW
#112 to #110 - DeathOne
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
Hehe, well, that sounds like bad luck more than bad skill...
Well, the AI relations are influenced mainly by one thing: religion. If you share a religion with the AI, he will like you a lot more. If you don't have a religion, but he does, no changes. If you adpoted a different religion, he'll hate you. So don't be a religious zealot, adopt the religion which your neighbours have!
Aside from that, I'm guessing they asked for tribute a couple of times and you always refused. This degrades their relations towards you, up until they declare war because they really want that cotton you have.
And last but not least, your units are automatically sent outside the border of the nation you declared war towards, this is made in order to prevent cheap attacks.
This is regarding what you just told me... tho I doubt ya remember much from that match.
What else can ya tell me that went wrong? Low science rates? High maintainance?
#116 to #112 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
I don't think those are the issues on the last line. My issue being that i have no ******* idea what everything is. From perserverance and many save files i can figure out little things but i sometimes end up doing something that in hindsight was rash and my young cities get razed by barbarians. usually the trouble is knowing where and when to make a city and what to do in said city. My newer cities (usually the third or fourth one) take forever to generate new buildings or units while the others had a few turns at their founding. Also muh borders. Other civs encroach upon my border cities and sometimes take them from me and i can't develop culture fast enough to make the borders big enough.
#119 to #116 - DeathOne
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
Ah yes, the enemy Civs take your borders away from you, That's always an issue.
Well, let's start with the begining: the teritorry. Where it's good to build cities, and where your city will starve to 1 population. The only places you should aim to avoid are the tundra, ice and desert tiles. Ice and desert give NO resources whatsoever, while Tundra gives only 1 food, and you can't build improvements there. How do you tell which land plots give more resources than the other? There's a couple of buttons above your minimap, enable the "show land yeld" and "show resources" one (name might vary, but you'll know em when you see em). The former shows you the resources the plot gives you (food, production and gold), while the second shows you the special resources you can build improvements on (cows, stone, corn and so on). Oh, and if there's a river, try building a city on the tile next to it. You can build farms next to rivers, and rivers also allow for more benefits which I'll tell as I go on.
... okay, where did I lose you?
#125 to #119 - verby
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
I always build in the tundra for the silver and deer. I can usually get like 8 pop with decent production if I manage my trading routes right
#135 to #125 - DeathOne
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
Yup, that's the only time when you should aim for tundra, if it's filled with luxury/strategic resources... tho I'll keep that for later.
#121 to #119 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
Still got it. didn't know about the buttons or the tiles part but i try to build next to rivers or, if there are none, the ocean
#141 to #121 - verby
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
Hey man, try to always build stonehenge and the great wall. Stonehenge is awesome because it means all your cities will auto expand after ten turns of being founded. It's also good to use your early military to conquer barbarians in order to get them experience. The key to war is patience, build your forces(my first wars are usually with 15 infantry units and 5 artillery, two groups like this and then a handful of cav) for several turns, and get them stationed on your enemy's borders. Conquer cities with access to resources you want, and then try to make the enemy your vassal if you don't want to expend the resources on conquering them totally.
Also, you don't really need a navy until you start doing intercontinental conquests
#142 to #141 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
got both of those things you said to build. but that was the save where i failed at a war victory
#143 to #142 - verby
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
Usually I just gradually get more and more vassals until everyone is my vassal and I win. Conquest victories are almost impossible though.
Oh, I forgot to mention, you can keep the enemy borders from expanding into yours by not signing open borders agreements.
Another thing you should be in the habit of is checking to see if anyone wants to trade technologies every time you research a new one(after you get paper) so you can get more tech that way. I just don't usually trade military tech.
#144 to #143 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
How do i get a vassal though? I have Civ 4 complete edition and i've never heard of getting vassals...
#147 to #144 - verby
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
Research feudalism when you go to negotiate peace there should be a "capitulation" option available. If you select it and they accept that as a peace term they will become your vassal. Be nice to them after that so they don't revolt
#133 to #121 - DeathOne
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
Well, I'll start up Civ 4 BtS to provide you with screenshots... if you are playing Civilization 4 without the Beyond the Sword expansion pack, then you're missing out on a lot. And no, the Warlords and Clonisation expansions are not required.
Another thing is the production. I'm sure that you noticed that while creating workers and settlers, the growth in your city is halted. Just good to keep in mind, especially if your city is 1 turn away from growing. The first thing you should do when starting a new game is either train a warrior if you started with a scout, or a barracks if you started with a warrior, do this until your capital reaches 2 population, then switch to worker. Why? Because you'll get a few extra hammers (production) on your barracks/warrior since you'll still train the worker within 15 turns after you started the new game because of the extra tile worked by your city (just make sure not to forget that your capital is auto-building a barracks/warrior, you might want to train something else, depending on what techs you have).
Did ya get that?
Y/N
#138 to #133 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
i got the complete edition which included the game, and the BtS, Colonization and warlords expansions. i play BtS most out of all of them because i'm not good at war, and i can't figure out colonization, and BtS is basically civ 4 but with more stuff. keep the tips coming they will definitely help me.
i got the complete edition which included the game, and the BtS, Colonization and warlords expansions. i play BtS most out of all of them because i'm not good at war, and i can't figure out colonization, and BtS is basically civ 4 but with more stuff. keep the tips coming they will definitely help me.
#145 to #138 - DeathOne
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
Alright, here's a printscreen to help ya mate. And good to know that you have the full edition.
So, I highlighted a bunch of stuff to help you. In the lower-right corner, some buttons you should know about.
The tile border display adds the checkerboard-like borders on the map, making it easier to distinguish where the tiles are (I used this to be able to show you the City plot working radius with ease, I don't play with this on as it's too ugly). But the other 3 buttons should be on at all times.
The Plot Yeld display, shows you what food//production/gold you can get from each tile, as shown with icons of bread, hammers and coins respectively in the middle of each tile.
The player score displays shows you the score each player has, above the buttons from the minimap, this allows you to see who's ahead of you, who you should be wary of, aswell as other things such as who you have a trade route with.
And last but not least, the Resource display. It shows you with big icons what resources are around you. As you can see in this printscreen, west of my city is a plot of Corn, which gives adittional food production with a farm built. To the east and south-east of my city, are gems. These give a big gold bonus with a mine built. And to the south, clams. These give more food and gold with fishing boats.
Well, gee Bill, how many tiles of land can I work around my city? That's why the city plot working radius is there, to show you how many tiles of land your city can work. In total: 20 tiles (tho the population limit is 15 if I recall). You goal, is to cover as many resources in that city radius as humanly possible, as they give bonus food, hammers and gold.
What about that Tribal Village? Well, send a unit over it, and you get a random goodie! Tech, gold, free scout, free warrior, or a map. Tho be careful, if the unit is not a scout, the tribal village might give you some barbarian warriors that will attack you on sight.
Did you get all that?
#149 to #145 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
the thing about the plot working radius. Does the radius limit the range at which you can connect resources to your city so it can benefit from them? and why does population matter? what does it do?   
   
but so far you've been a bro, thanks for the help that i couldn't find no matter where i googled
the thing about the plot working radius. Does the radius limit the range at which you can connect resources to your city so it can benefit from them? and why does population matter? what does it do?

but so far you've been a bro, thanks for the help that i couldn't find no matter where i googled
#152 to #149 - DeathOne
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
The radius affects how much your city can work (as long as it's within your borders, of course), but as long as the resource is within your borders, just build the appropiate improvement on it, connect it to your trade network (usually this means connecting it to your city with a road), and you're good to go. Having resources such as cows and gems usually give you adittional health and happiness, tho some resources like corn need a building in the city to grant it the benefit (in this case, a granary, to grant the city +1 health).
Oh, population is very very important. Each population works another plot of land around your city (or becomes a specialist, but we'll talk about that, like many other things, later). As you can see in this printscreen (enlarging, as always, helps), the white circles around my city represent the tiles the population works. Because I have two tiles, it works two plots of land, esentially doubling it's output. In the lower-left corner in a red rectangle you can see how I just switched to worker since my city reached 2 population. He will be up and running within 12 turns, and after that, it'll only take the city 4 turns to make a warrior and keep my city safe. The upper-right corner of the screen, you can see that I am on turn 8, so it may take you a little longer to get the worker up, but the early warrior in your city makes up for it.
Oh, and before I forget, what food, hammers and gold do. Food is used to grow a city, thus, giving it a larger population, and it slightly speeds up the training of units. The hammers are used to train units and construct buildings, and gold... well, it makes the world go round, doesn't it? Pay for maintainance, upgrade units, get better options from random events, and so on.
Any questions so far?
#154 to #152 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
what do you mean by "what your city can work"?

also can you elaborate a bit more on trade routes?
#159 to #154 - DeathOne
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
By "what your city can work", I mean the tiles of land the white circles can land on. As you can see in the previous printscreen (#152), on the 3rd tile east of my city, are tiles with dye resource. When my border expand and cover that tile, my city won't be able to directly work the tile, as it is out of it's city radius (as displayed in red in comment #145). But I can build an improvement on it and add it to my trade network.

And I was just getting to the trade network. The simple explanation would be all the cities and resources connected to your capital. This connection can be realised through 3 primary ways: a connection by land with roads, a connection by river and a connection by the shoreline. In the printscreen I have attached to this comment, you can see a certain important technology: Sailing. Sailing allows trade networks to be formed between cities connected by shore (in other words: all cities built next to the ocean) or a river, and thus, you don't need to build a road between them, saving you time and money on maintaining the road. What purpose does the trade network serve? Well, let's say that you have a second city next to gold. You build a mine on the gold tile, but your city doesn't have access to it, since you didn't build a road between the gold mine and the city. You build a road, and your city has access to the gold resource. But only that city. If you want your capital to also have access to gold, then it must be connected to your second city via shoreline, river or road. Another thing trading routes do is generate a little money. And last but not least, if you and another nation are connected via any trade routes (be it road, river or shoreline), you can trade!
I hope I didn't turn your brains into pasta with this one.
#160 to #159 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
no it cleared up a lot of things for me.

you really should make a guide, all the ones i've found are not very good and don't really cover things in a simple way and throw too much information at you
#161 to #160 - DeathOne
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
Hehe, thanks man, tho I'm not done yet, and I was worrying I'm throwing too much information at you already... but that's what Civ is like, so bear with it, it gets so much simpler once you understand all this stuff.   
Now, before I go on, I gotta add a little to what I've said before. Farms can only be built next to a fresh water source (either a river, oasis or a lake) until you research a tech in the medieval era, I won't go on about which techs do what because you'll find out about those as you play, but the ones you need to know like the back of your palm are the ones you can research before the classical era (Agriculture, the wheel, pottery, mining and so on).   
   
Oh, and another thing. Resources are divided into two categories: luxury, and strategical. I told you about luxury resources, corn, cows and everything that makes your people happier. Now, strategical resources are horse, copper, iron and such, they allow you to train better units. For example: you need copper or iron to train axemen and spearmen, and swordsmen can only be trained with iron. This is another reason you need to connect all your cities to your capital one way or the other: so that all the cities can train advanced units.   
   
Now, if I didn't mess your head with these adittions, shall I go on with pottery?
Hehe, thanks man, tho I'm not done yet, and I was worrying I'm throwing too much information at you already... but that's what Civ is like, so bear with it, it gets so much simpler once you understand all this stuff.
Now, before I go on, I gotta add a little to what I've said before. Farms can only be built next to a fresh water source (either a river, oasis or a lake) until you research a tech in the medieval era, I won't go on about which techs do what because you'll find out about those as you play, but the ones you need to know like the back of your palm are the ones you can research before the classical era (Agriculture, the wheel, pottery, mining and so on).

Oh, and another thing. Resources are divided into two categories: luxury, and strategical. I told you about luxury resources, corn, cows and everything that makes your people happier. Now, strategical resources are horse, copper, iron and such, they allow you to train better units. For example: you need copper or iron to train axemen and spearmen, and swordsmen can only be trained with iron. This is another reason you need to connect all your cities to your capital one way or the other: so that all the cities can train advanced units.

Now, if I didn't mess your head with these adittions, shall I go on with pottery?
#163 to #161 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
yeah yeah. you're fine with the rate of knowledge your giving. i can learn things pretty quickly and i know how Civilization basically so this isn't brand new information
#173 to #163 - DeathOne
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
You said you're having trouble with the settler difficulty, so I am trying to cover EVERYTHING about the basics of Civ 4.
EVERYTHING!

So, once you research the pottery (which requires the wheel and either fishing or agriculture), you can construct the Granary. Now, alongside the monument, the Granary is one of the essential buildings any city should have. Why? When the city grows, the granary will save 50% of the food it required to grow, so it will esentially make your cities grow at double speed.
Oh, and regarding your trade network, an easy way to figure out if a city is connected to your capital, is to look above it's name. Here, you can see 3 arrows in a circle, this means that it is connected to your capital. In this case, by shore. Horray!

Now, let me think a little, where else am I going at... oh yeah, expanding your borders! To do that, you need culture. What is culture? It's a resource who's main use is to expand your nation's borders. Cities start with 0 culture output, but buildings such as the monument and library increase it, and allow your city to expand. As mentoned in the comment above by verby (don't you think I didn't notice you!), you can build the Stonehenge and get a free monument in each and every single city you have. What else can this lovely culture do? Well, if you have a city next to another civ's city, if your city has a ridiculously high ammount of culture, it can actually make the other city join your nation! Now, isn't that lovely? Aside from that, I'm pretty sure it makes the other city a lot unhappier if it's owner goes to war with you.
Ah, yes, unhappiness. It's pretty simple: the more your city grows, the unhappier your city is. The longer you are at war, the bigger the unhappiness. And some other factors and random events, but those two are the main factors: city size, and war. Why is unhappiness so bad? For each unhappiness a city has, one population refuses to work.
I'll continue on unhappiness a little in the next comment.
#177 to #173 - rakaka
+1
(07/25/2013) [-]
looks like i can't reply to your other comment as FJ has a limit. but i got it from wal-mart (i dont know what TPB is because i'm a filthy casual) and how the **** do you get rid of those angry citizens and how do you fix things like "it's too crowded!" and other things
#174 to #173 - DeathOne
+1
(07/25/2013) [-]
Picture reciclying, ho!

So, yeah, as you can see in this pic, in the red rectangle you can see the happy/unhappy ratio. Move your mouse over for details as of why your citisens are so happy/unhappy. For every unhappiness above your happiness, a citizen refuses to work, so you have one less white circle on your map.

Any questions?

Oh, by the way, did you get the complete edition from Steam, or TPB?
#181 to #90 - DeathOne
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
>YFW so far   
Yup, FJ does that. Usually when this happens, you go to the first comment that you replied to, and restart the thread from there, from where you left off.   
   
TPB is Thepiratebay, you know, piracy and stuff. And where you get your games from doesn't make you a casual, only the game you play. And Civ4 is not for casuals, that's for sure.   
   
Well, you can't remove unhappiness. "It's too crowded" is inevitable, as that simply means that your city's population has grown too much. You generate happiness by having a religion, constructing certain buildings like temples and colloseums, by connect luxury resources to your trade network and last but not least, adopting certain civics (I'll tell you about them later). But first, I need to tell you about religions!   
Now, religion is a very important aspect of this game. I already told you about the relations with the AI, but it also gives you a little happiness. How do you get religion? Well, some techs such as meditation and polytheism grant the first one to research them a religion, aswell as a holy city for it. Aside from that, you just open up your borders with different civs and hope that they'll send missionaries to you. Founding a religion is very helpfull, if you start with the "Mysticism" technology, always research meditation first, and you'll always be the first one to found Buddhism (unless you fiddle around with the science rate, don't touch that, the excess ammount of science is carried on to your next tech, same goes for production in cities).   
In short, having a religion gives you happiness, better allies, and more terrifying enemies.   
Anything that I have failed to explain, or shall I move on to Great People?
>YFW so far
Yup, FJ does that. Usually when this happens, you go to the first comment that you replied to, and restart the thread from there, from where you left off.

TPB is Thepiratebay, you know, piracy and stuff. And where you get your games from doesn't make you a casual, only the game you play. And Civ4 is not for casuals, that's for sure.

Well, you can't remove unhappiness. "It's too crowded" is inevitable, as that simply means that your city's population has grown too much. You generate happiness by having a religion, constructing certain buildings like temples and colloseums, by connect luxury resources to your trade network and last but not least, adopting certain civics (I'll tell you about them later). But first, I need to tell you about religions!
Now, religion is a very important aspect of this game. I already told you about the relations with the AI, but it also gives you a little happiness. How do you get religion? Well, some techs such as meditation and polytheism grant the first one to research them a religion, aswell as a holy city for it. Aside from that, you just open up your borders with different civs and hope that they'll send missionaries to you. Founding a religion is very helpfull, if you start with the "Mysticism" technology, always research meditation first, and you'll always be the first one to found Buddhism (unless you fiddle around with the science rate, don't touch that, the excess ammount of science is carried on to your next tech, same goes for production in cities).
In short, having a religion gives you happiness, better allies, and more terrifying enemies.
Anything that I have failed to explain, or shall I move on to Great People?
#182 to #181 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
you can move on but one quest chin. when you adopt a religion is it just added to your list of religions or does it replace the one you have. i've been refusing demands to convert because i wanted to keep my current religion.
#185 to #182 - DeathOne
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
When you adopt a religion, it changes your main religion, but the other religions don't magically dissapear from your cities, they still exist there.
Oh, and an example of what happened to me regarding city construction. I had to build a new city, and I had these 3 spots. Now, because I don't have the plantation technology yet (and thus, I can't value the dye resources), nor did I have a direct trade route to the two red squares around the dye, I chose to build my city on the coast around stone, fish and elephants, since it is also already connected to the capital via a trade route along the shoreline (as shown with red lines).

Alright, so, Great People. Great People (GP) are generated with Great People Points (GPP). GPP is generated by wonders and specialist (specialists coming up right after this). What do they do? Well, there are several GP. The Stonehenge generates Great Prophet Points and thus, create the Great Prophet, which is the most important great person you can have if you founded a religion. Why? Only a Great Prophet can build a shrine in a holy city (instantly and for free, I might add). What does the shrine do? Well, each religion can have one shrine in it's one and only holy city (selected at random, any city that belongs to the nation which founded the religion can become the holy city), the shrine generates a lot of culture, spreads the religion, and generates one gold for each city in the world practicing the religion (and early in game, that is a lot!). What other great people are there, and what can they do? Great Engineers can rush and finish the production of any building and wonder (most of them, at least, if not, they give a generous boost). Great Artists can generate a huge culture boost in a city, Great Scientists can give you a free tech or a boost. Aside from their abilities and each of them being able to build it's own unique building, Great People can join a city as a specialist.
No space left to write, any questions?
#187 to #185 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
how would having a direct trade route to the red squares help? I mean this from your perspective, what would be different?
#193 to #187 - DeathOne
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
It would save me the time of building a road to my city, valuable time. And besides, cities built on the coast generate more gold thanks to being connected to cities from other nations along the coastline.   
   
So I'm guessing that you understood what Great People do. Alright, next up: Specialists!   
Now, there are two kind of specialists: free specialists created by assigning great people to a city (who generate their specific resource, science from great scientists for example) and by constructing wonders, and specialists which YOU assign. You can assign specialists once you build a building which allows them to be assigned (a temple allows for a priest to be assigned, a library for a scientist, and so on). These specialists generate great people points, in adittion to their bonus resource (science from scientists, gold from merchant, and so on). Oh, and one more thing: a specialist is nothing more than one population of the city assigned inside a building (in other words: it removes a white circle from the map).   
And I almost forgot. The more great people a city generates, the more great people points it needs to generate it's next great person, so try to have more cities generate great people with less great people point generation, than one huge city with a truckload of great person point generation.   
   
Now, let me think what I missed... hmm... oh, how to expand without loosing money! Well, the main issue with expanding is that you never know how much you should do it. Well, the answer is simple: start off by expanding till you have 3-5 cities (keep an eye on your science meter, don't let it drop below 70%). Now, how do you generate gold? Well, you can build the cottage improvement (and as time goes on, it generates more gold), you can build lots of cities with lots of trade routes (AKA, alongside the coast), and you can construct buildings such as markets to increase your gold output (these buildings also allow you to assign the merchant specialist in a city).   
Got it?
It would save me the time of building a road to my city, valuable time. And besides, cities built on the coast generate more gold thanks to being connected to cities from other nations along the coastline.

So I'm guessing that you understood what Great People do. Alright, next up: Specialists!
Now, there are two kind of specialists: free specialists created by assigning great people to a city (who generate their specific resource, science from great scientists for example) and by constructing wonders, and specialists which YOU assign. You can assign specialists once you build a building which allows them to be assigned (a temple allows for a priest to be assigned, a library for a scientist, and so on). These specialists generate great people points, in adittion to their bonus resource (science from scientists, gold from merchant, and so on). Oh, and one more thing: a specialist is nothing more than one population of the city assigned inside a building (in other words: it removes a white circle from the map).
And I almost forgot. The more great people a city generates, the more great people points it needs to generate it's next great person, so try to have more cities generate great people with less great people point generation, than one huge city with a truckload of great person point generation.

Now, let me think what I missed... hmm... oh, how to expand without loosing money! Well, the main issue with expanding is that you never know how much you should do it. Well, the answer is simple: start off by expanding till you have 3-5 cities (keep an eye on your science meter, don't let it drop below 70%). Now, how do you generate gold? Well, you can build the cottage improvement (and as time goes on, it generates more gold), you can build lots of cities with lots of trade routes (AKA, alongside the coast), and you can construct buildings such as markets to increase your gold output (these buildings also allow you to assign the merchant specialist in a city).
Got it?
#196 to #193 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
got it. the science meter is the little percentage in the top left corner right?
#205 to #196 - DeathOne
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
Alright, posted both comments, read em ^^
#202 to #196 - DeathOne
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
Yup.
Let me think what else.... well, there's all sort of simple stuff that you can figure out on your own (such as the fact that if a tile of land generates 5 of a resource, instead of showing a slice of bread, a hammer or a coin, it shows a whole bread, an anvile or a bag of money). I think that I told you most of the stuff that need explaining, the rest is trial and error, see what each tech does, see what buildings do, create your own playstyle, don't neglect your army, never, under ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, don't let your settler wander off outside your teritorry by himself (wild animals hunt settlers because they are programmed to, give him a military unit to escort him), don't overexpand, always take care to have enough workers for all your cities (one worker per city is usually enough), and have fun!

D'oh! I almost forgot the civics!
As you research tech, you unlock civics. You can select "Show me the big picture" in order to see what the civic you just unlocked gives you. Slavery, allows you to finish the production of a building, wonder or a unit at the cost of population. This comes in handy early in the game because your city expands until it has unhappy citizens because it has grown too much. You then use slavery to sacrifice citizens to finish a building, this generates 1 unhappiness, but the citizens eliminated already generated unhappiness, so it's really a win-win, especially since population is easily recovered. Changing civics and religion gives you anarcy (1 turn of anarchy every 2 civics, you can change 2 civics at the same time for 1 turn of anarcy, the 3rd civic gives you 2 turns of anarchy). During anarchy, you have no production whatsoever.

(continued)
#204 to #202 - DeathOne
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
(continued below)

Oh, and your cities. Each city should have 2-3 food sources (farms or fishing boats on fish/clams), aside from that, either mines or cottages, depending on what you want that city to be (your capital should be the only jack-of-all-trades city), each city should have 1-2 mines for production tho. Aside from the food and production sources, build whatever is more suitable: cottages for gold cities, or mines for production cities (army and wonder building and such).

Ah, this is the last thing, I swear! Each military unit specialises in pounding another military unit (exept the archer, he is meant to defend a city), so don't spam one unit, ever in your life, have a little variety. Catapults are special, as when they attack, in spite of their lower strenght, they do collateral damage and cause several units in a stack to take damage, this is useful when trying to take over cities. Aside from that, if they are on a tile next to a city, they can use the "bombard" option to reduce the city's defenses, do this until the city has 0% defense. Then hold right click on the city and see what your army's combat odds are. If the odds are in your favor, attack. If not, wait a turn, then send catapults one by one until they've done enough collateral damage to swing the odds in your favor (but if the city has 1-3 units, you can just attack it, a few of your units will die, but if your attack force is much larger, there is no real waste.

Now, any final questions, or shall I wish you luck on your next Civ game (and pray to God that you're still sane after all this)?
#208 to #204 - rakaka
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
nope, you covered everything. I'll go and try- OH WAIT

what victory should i go for and how do i decide on my civilization?
#224 to #208 - DeathOne
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
Welp, I need to drop off.
Goodnight, and let me know if you got any better at Civ!
#209 to #208 - DeathOne
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
You're playing on Settler, so you shouldn't have much trouble with any victory conditions, but I'd say to go for science victory all while having an ocassional war (wars are not to be won in one continous battle, you declare war, capture/pillage a city or two, then go to peace, regroup, heal, wait for the peace treaty to expire, cleanse and repeat). Why science? So you'll get to the information era, get a feel of all the techs and such. Standard speed, standard map size, Continents map.   
As for the Civilization, I really have no idea, see what each of them does, then decide what best suits your needs. Or go random like me :3   
Good luck!
You're playing on Settler, so you shouldn't have much trouble with any victory conditions, but I'd say to go for science victory all while having an ocassional war (wars are not to be won in one continous battle, you declare war, capture/pillage a city or two, then go to peace, regroup, heal, wait for the peace treaty to expire, cleanse and repeat). Why science? So you'll get to the information era, get a feel of all the techs and such. Standard speed, standard map size, Continents map.
As for the Civilization, I really have no idea, see what each of them does, then decide what best suits your needs. Or go random like me :3
Good luck!
#56 - reretzu
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
Man, I really want to play Civilization 5 more, but ever since I downloaded Gods and Kings it'll crash almost instantly, it's gotten so bad I can't even play anymore and none of the solutions I found on google help...
Man, I really want to play Civilization 5 more, but ever since I downloaded Gods and Kings it'll crash almost instantly, it's gotten so bad I can't even play anymore and none of the solutions I found on google help...
#66 to #56 - ilolyoucry
Reply +3
(07/25/2013) [-]
I am sorry for you. It is pretty fun.
#76 to #66 - reretzu
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
I know, I played it a lot before Gods and Kings, and I managed to get one game pretty far before it started crashing like wild.
#78 to #76 - ilolyoucry
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
I wonder if it is just that single save that is messing up the game?
I don't know, but it still sucks.
Hope you get it figured out soon.
#79 to #78 - reretzu
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
I've tried deleting all of my saves, game worked for slightly longer before crashing again.
But thank you regardless.
#86 to #79 - lostxprophit
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
look around on google or youtube? It could be cause you might not have enough ram or something like that...but you never know, might be something completely different
#179 - wonderlandman
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
Comment Picture
#190 to #179 - thebritishguy
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
makes sense
#164 - sittingwhale
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
>unpopular opinion time.
>I like playing Civ IV better than Civ V.
>come at me, bro.
#172 to #164 - infernis
+1
has deleted their comment [-]
#228 to #172 - sittingwhale
Reply 0
(07/26/2013) [-]
well i guess i stand corrected then.. everyone I've talked to likes V better.
#229 to #228 - pensivepangolin
Reply 0
(07/26/2013) [-]
It's kind of split half and half. From my personal experience, those who liked Civ IV better played Civ IV first. Those who liked V better played V first. I, for one, prefer Civ IV. I liked the square tiles more than the hexagonal, and I REALLY hated the fact that you couldn't stack units in V
#230 to #229 - sittingwhale
Reply 0
(07/26/2013) [-]
I really don't like how easy it is for people to hate you on civ V. in my expericence, once they denounce you its over and they'll never like you again. In IV i could beat the **** out of someone and then be friends like 100 turns later. I kind of like the new combat system and tiles though
#234 to #230 - pensivepangolin
Reply +1
(07/26/2013) [-]
That's true. I felt that in Civ V, you had to fight and be aggressive to survive at all. In Civ IV, I was able to focus on science and culture more than an army and win the game solely based on that. Sure, wars may be fun, but i also gained enjoyment by seeing myself rise above the rest of the world technologically.
#129 - sgc
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
i remember playing civ 2. i started on a randomly shaped island and totally populated it. i had all my money into taxes and luxury and very little in science. i didn't see anyone untill i sent out my first ship that could stay alive in open water, this is when i saw a ******* battle ship. turns out i was a few hundreds of years behind everyone else.

side note i can't play my civ 2 disk on current pc, anyone know where i can download a working copy or have a fix for me?
#87 - nigalthornberry
+2
has deleted their comment [-]
#62 - halor
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
i like the games but i've been having major problems recently, every time i play all the other civilizations quickly gain a huge army and proceed to start attacking me...i fend them off but then start losing money every turn
#113 to #62 - anon
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
If you can't handle it, try turning the difficulty down a notch till you improve.
#169 to #113 - halor
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
well it was on a difficulty i used to not have problems with
#61 - pwnagraphy
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
>Civ Rev
>Play as Aztecs
>Be at peace with Germany
>Pay them for defense
>Put huge amounts of money into military
>6 armies worth of tanks
>4 plane squads
>America tries to attack
>destroy all others within 20 turns
#18 - ishallsmiteyou ONLINE
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
I was playing Germany, and I had 5 cities (3 where Germany is in real life and 2 on islands north of Australia) and everyone else had at least 8 cities. Rome had all of Africa, conquered France, and took half of Denmark. MFW they declared war on me
#21 to #18 - accalia
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
Should be an easy win
#22 to #21 - ishallsmiteyou ONLINE
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
It was. I play with the end at industrial era mod (so I don't have to scrub fallout every 5 minutes). I had 60 or 70 units of oil and every city had every building, so I was pumpin out Tiger IIs like Bieber does ********.
#23 to #22 - accalia
Reply +2
(07/25/2013) [-]
I bet Ceasar was all like "**** its the hun's all over again"
#24 to #23 - ishallsmiteyou ONLINE
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
More or less. I ended up taking over half of his empire and annexing it, and even when he was down to his last city (I think it was Paris) he still wanted me to give him all of my resources to stop the war.
#25 to #24 - accalia
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
One final push and he would be off the map, though I personally prefer to raze cities rather than annex, so much more satisfying burning their cities and their civ's to the ground
#26 to #25 - ishallsmiteyou ONLINE
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
Yeah. I captured Paris (I like to think I also hung Caesar off the Eiffel Tower) and liberated Paris to give them all of their cities back.
#201 - machinimax
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
Alright ***** listen to this:

>Playing Civ 5 with a friend.
>We are in 4 teams
>Team 1: Me, him and Paccal
>Team 2: Wu, Montezuma (YEAAAH) and some other hood ass *****
>Team 3: Attila, Catherine and Alexander
>Team 4: Gustav. Just for ***** and giggles
>Team 2 and 3 are clearly about to start a war with eachother, asked us 5 times if we wanna help
>Me and my friends try to convince Wu to start a war alone so she can weaken Attila and we can take over his lands.
>"No"
>Lolwut
>5 turns later. They declare war.
>Attila starts building a chariot or something while Wu moves her troops.
>Wu's troops circle around a hill for 2 turns
>"TEAM 2 HAS DECLARED PEACE ON TEAM 3."

And that is when we realized we had set them to easy...
#210 to #201 - ninjastarthrow ONLINE
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
You set them to Canadian.
#180 - pottslande
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
I've just started playing Civ 5 with Polynesia

Attila the Hun is a bitch and Genghis Khan is my bro
#188 to #180 - rangerofthesea
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
me and khan were bros man until he betrayed me about ten turns ago...i think this game is lost because i have 3 or 4 people teamed up against me and pressing my left flank,, think the only reason i havent died yet is because germany is keeping to their own bidniss
#191 to #180 - icewraith
0
has deleted their comment [-]
#192 to #180 - Sethorein ONLINE
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
Playing as Khan is ballin'

Get to medieval era and get the horse archers. Rush in, shoot, run away. Easiest mid game victories ever.
#178 - pillowmeister
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
I, for one, support the making of this pillow.
#156 - commentorman
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
**commentorman rolled a random image posted in comment #13 at I'd cry if this happened **

What I explored
#59 - nucularwar
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
I want a game like Civilization or Age of Empires, but using Minecraft graphics and building ideas. Build my empire block by block.
#17 - guiguito
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
the opening music for that game, god that made me cum so hard.
#16 - brainstormer
Reply +1
(07/25/2013) [-]
check out the Realism Invictus mod for BtS
check out the Realism Invictus mod for BtS
#118 to #16 - thebeatlesfan
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
It seems really cool. Will this work on a not so great computer or is it gonna be way too laggy?
#123 to #118 - brainstormer
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
there is an issue with the memory and the type of ur OS. longer games (the fun ones) demand more memory and some may crash on 32bit OS. CPU power is also needed for a smoother gameplay. I've got 8GB of RAM on a 64bit OS and an i7-3740 and in the modern age it gets a bit laggy
#126 to #123 - thebeatlesfan
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
Yeah it's probably not gonna be great for me. I only have 4 GB of RAM on a 64bit OS. But I'm downloading it anyway to check it out.
#128 to #126 - brainstormer
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
just check it out, I actually enjoy the most the time before the industrialization, when new continents may be reached, it really stirs up the game
#131 to #128 - thebeatlesfan
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
I haven't played Civ in a long time. I'm hoping this will get me back into it.
#136 to #131 - brainstormer
Reply 0
(07/25/2013) [-]
most definitely, last time it got me hooked for a few months a while ago, and I'm not that into video games now =D