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#160 - silverhellion
Reply +3
(06/17/2013) [-]
anyone else think top panel looks like a younger christopher walken?
#79 - fennoswede
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
WHat? DNA has a 521 year half-life, the sculpture is meaningless!
#88 to #79 - schneidend
Reply +2
(06/17/2013) [-]
Wouldn't being frozen and pressurized in a giant container help extend that?
#90 to #88 - fennoswede
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
no the molecules are instable even if they are coated in ice
#92 to #90 - schneidend
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
But weren't we able to clone mammoth tissue from frozen mammoth bodies? They aren't being preserved in a special housing designed by engineers.
#97 to #92 - kristovsky
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
temperature of the atoms doesn't affect their stability, the reason that only frozen DNA from mammoths has survived is because otherwise bacteria eats all of the flesh.
#106 to #97 - schneidend
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
Right, but those samples remained more or less viable after longer than 1042 years, assuming a 521 year half-life is accurate.
#108 to #106 - kristovsky
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
I am not a genetics expert and take no side in this argument. I was merely explaining that temperature is more or less irrelevant concerning the half life of the DNA
#109 to #108 - schneidend
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
Right-o. Thanks for the info.
#112 to #109 - kristovsky
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
Your welcome.
#127 to #108 - yomamabetrippin
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
1    2    3    SCIENCE BITCH
1 2 3 SCIENCE BITCH
#98 to #97 - schneidend
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has deleted their comment [-]
#101 to #98 - kristovsky
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has deleted their comment [-]
#94 to #92 - fennoswede
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
yes but the dna have a half-life different cellcores have a difference in DNA corruption

like using 10 puzzle boxes that's missing parts, you can combine the 10 boxes to one complete kit and if it ***** up you have the closely related elephant
#99 to #94 - schneidend
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
That would be why multiple samples from multiple donors are going in the sculpture, then.
#102 to #99 - fennoswede
Reply +2
(06/17/2013) [-]
yeah but corruption wold still occur and this **** is advanced! i think the more logic thing is to preserve dna by using computers
#104 to #102 - schneidend
Reply +2
(06/17/2013) [-]
Even if the DNA doesn't hold up, it is still a project with cultural and artistic aspects. It's a giant time capsule, so it can store other things. Also, a computer database has plenty of weaknesses, too. Physical destruction by warfare or the elements, accessibility (it's not at the bottom of the ocean, after all), electromagnetic pulses, and the need for constant maintenance.
#105 to #104 - fennoswede
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
yeah i cant argue about that, a mighty interesting discussion we had there!
#111 to #105 - schneidend
Reply +2
(06/17/2013) [-]
Agreed. I hadn't considered that DNA might not last forever. I learned something today.
#67 - IAmManbearpig
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
wouldn't the iron structure, ya know, rust away to nothing fairly quickly?
#72 to #67 - infinitereaper
Reply +2
(06/17/2013) [-]
Don't know but he put it in the Mariana Trench.

Ain't nobody got time for that.

It's never coming out of there and is lost forever.
#73 to #72 - IAmManbearpig
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
scientists be crazy
#21 - helenwheels
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
Anyone know the name of that documentary?
#25 to #21 - lolfire
Reply +2
(06/17/2013) [-]
The homeless one ?

Reversals of fortune.
#86 to #25 - longcock
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
Is it any good?
#87 to #86 - lolfire
Reply +2
(06/17/2013) [-]
Meh, the guy just buys an apartment, an expensive car, buys his friends a few cars, gets engaged, spends all the money, loses everything, rinse and repeat.
#131 - potatophucker
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
As soon as I saw the scalp I was like: "**** yeah, Kurt cobain!"
#130 - azinfoo
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
Why couldn't this guys just wear a blindfold... Or shine a powerful laser in his eyes... or even ******* gouge his eyes out if he wanted to?

There seems to be many other options better than suicide.
#151 to #130 - lordpancake
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
You just can't unsee some ****, man.
#121 - Fgner
Reply -2
(06/17/2013) [-]
> Keeping a record of DNA samples of all the animals we can for future preservation and recreation... But putting it in the most inaccessible place on the ******* planet. And it's a massive trench - even if someone THOUGHT to look there, statistically speaking, they wouldn't find it.

> Source? That sounds retarded. I doubt a 14 year old kid's dream is to kill himself. Anyone can say anyone said anything at anytime, it doesn't make it true. Unless you have evidence, don't bother.

> That's actually true.

> So is this. But then again, cheetahs have a 95% infant mortality rate, and demales are often rare. This mother simply has personality traits and a good physical condition allowing her to keep cubs alive for longer. But 10% means nothing, especially if there are only 50 adults. She's only 7, so it can't be that many. Let's say she's had 9 cubs every year for 5 years - that's 45 cubs. Now let's be generous and give her a 10% mortality rate - so she's had ~40 cubs. Like I said, not near as impressive when the statistics are removed. Although still impressive.

> Again, source? Why did it take him 2 years to get terrified and confused? I highly doubt he'd kill himself. In fact, I've seen blind and deaf people get their sight/sound back - they cry tears of joy. They love this new amazing thing they've never had. It's a natural part of existance - and while the beginning might be a little weird to transition since often the missing sense's brain allocation will instead be used to increase perspective abilities of other senses (like advanced echolocation for deaf people), they always snap into a normal place. And they get used to it within a few months (but never lose the appreciation). Designing software for chips to give hearing/sight impaired people is my job... I would know.

> Haven't got a clue, too lazy to Google, and out of characters.
#125 to #121 - floofy
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
1. unless it was attached to a cable and winch   
   
2. were you sheltered when you were 14? kids say some messed up stuff.   
   
3. 10 percent is still 10 percent.   
   
4.  how do you know how people act? i dont much believe this myself either though.   
   
5. no, that pretty much happened. Not quite how they say it though.
1. unless it was attached to a cable and winch

2. were you sheltered when you were 14? kids say some messed up stuff.

3. 10 percent is still 10 percent.

4. how do you know how people act? i dont much believe this myself either though.

5. no, that pretty much happened. Not quite how they say it though.
#137 to #125 - Fgner
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
1) Or we could just store it, you know, in an underground bunker of some sort. Far more controlled, far more secure.
2) No, but on average kids don't plan on killing themselves when they grow up. So it can be assumed that it's false. And I can't help but notice you didn't even addres the second half: This is just going off their word.
3) That's not the point. I was pointing out the problem with statistics. Liek I said - "not near as impressive when statistics are removed. Although still impressive." I addressed that 10% is still a lot.
4) *ahem* THIS IS MY JOB. Did you read that last sentence, I make the software for optical or auditory chips that interact with the brain. Not all that many people are getting prototypes at this point - I see their reactions. I get news on how they're doing quite often. It's part of the job and one of the reasons why I love doing it so.
5) I don't know what you're talking about here. But if you mean the guy: "He died two years after his operation due to a prolonged period of ill health, with no specific cause of death noted." He died of being a human being. He didn't kill himself.
Also his confusion didn't come from the fact he could see - it came from things like abstract art that he couldn't understand, the fact that he was so old that his brain couldn't adjust itself to properly use sight, the fact that suddenly after 52 years of blindness and his brain repurposing the imaging portion of his brain to became a tool of echolocation, memory, and fine motor control/sensory was forced back into imaging isn't exactly "good" for you.
It was noted that when he was working or overwhelmed, he simply closed his eyes and he felt better.
#138 to #137 - floofy
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
well storing it in the trench is cheaper and more secure. plus the extreme cold would keep it nice and crispy fresh.

btw im not down thumbing you queer no need to be all aggressive
#140 to #138 - Fgner
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
1) It's a huge project to begin with. Gimping out on the container would be like buying a Ferrari and then holding back on white-wall tires to save $50.
2) Extreme cold would cause the destruction of cirtually all the cells being stored. Cells are what contains DNA. The project would be better of simply extracting DNA and storing it in it's purest form in a solvent with a virtually 0K freezing point.
3) I'm not being aggressive? I get thumbed down plenty, buddy. It's not a big deal. I usually never even thumb myself (I'm sorry, everyone). It seems everyone hates all of us. Even SirSheepy.
#142 to #140 - SirSheepy
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
but I 3> u bby
#155 to #142 - Fgner
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
floofy doesn't understand.
#141 to #140 - floofy
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
well i guess this is what a high school education gets you. I'm talented in the sciences but they didnt teach me ****. glad im going to college this fall....

but i think the main benefit of the trench is to keep anyone from accessing it. At least someone preventing corruption or attack
#153 to #141 - Fgner
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
The only way to prevent access would not to have a harness, anchor it to the bottom, then have the location stored in a high-security zone... Skip the middle man, make the entire operation simpler - store the contents of the container in a high-security zone with environment control, easy access when needed/necessary, capable of expansion, etc.
#136 to #125 - SirSheepy
Reply -1
(06/17/2013) [-]
Don't be silly, he obviously hasn't hit 14 yet/.
#100 - mayoroftownsville
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
Ashoka was a bloodthirsty warlord who massacred non-Buddhists by the thousands.
#115 to #100 - teranin
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
reminds me of something
reminds me of something
#91 - CaptainWaffles
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
Why would you put an IRON sculpture into sea water? That's just asking for instant oxidation.
#64 - EdwardNigma ONLINE
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
The first one, I have several questions about.
Why? Why do it if you don't expect something so bad to happen that you'll need it?
Second, how will you get it back out?
And finally, won't the iron rust and thus make this futile?
#23 - lilRican
Reply -1
(06/17/2013) [-]
Wait can someone go in-depth with the first one?   
   
How would that bring endangered species back to life exactly?   
   
I might be reading it wrong as well
Wait can someone go in-depth with the first one?

How would that bring endangered species back to life exactly?

I might be reading it wrong as well
#26 to #23 - anon
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
Do some research on stem cells.
#27 to #23 - postmortem
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
Propably cloning or something like that in the future ,
#19 - marticuss
Reply +1
(06/17/2013) [-]
Anyone have any sauce on the third one???
#181 - tazerjmarks
Reply 0
(06/19/2013) [-]
<--- Face by: Thomas J Baker
#162 - lotengo
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has deleted their comment [-]
#84 - anon
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
Brad Pitt -> Kurt Cobain Biography. Just compare the pictures.
#14 - anothereposter **User deleted account**
0
has deleted their comment [-]
#6 - anon
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
ruled India form
#5 - joshofsouls
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]


www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xE54zD5hsk
That first one kinda scares me for some reason...
#4 - therealtjthemedic
Reply 0
(06/17/2013) [-]
First one....
i think that was an SCP