Problems.. Life can be rough. more at . THIS IS 'lailii) man was EEO was in ear an! toonhole toon cartoon comic webcomic gag problems first world wonderful dream dream
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> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
#1 - anon id: d675178e
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/22/2013) [-]
#13 to #1 - imashitbricks
-4 123456789123345869
has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #18 to #13 - KazumaKyu
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Half filled before the iron ball/ping pong ball are introduced. The water level rises because mass is displaced, much like how dropping ice cubes into a drink makes it look like there's suddenly more liquid in the glass.
User avatar #4 to #1 - dafuckisthisshit
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
i think it stays unchanged
User avatar #2 to #1 - mayormilkman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/22/2013) [-]
I'm afraid we need to use...MATH
In all honesty, I don't really feel like looking at my old physics notes now.
User avatar #3 to #1 - robotekk
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/22/2013) [-]
The ping pong ball side drops I believe
User avatar #42 to #1 - zzforrest
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Up to the left, the ping-pong end would float. The iron ball isn't attached in any way, so it doesn't affect the weight in the beaker. The ping-pong, however, is attached to the bottom of the beaker meaning the force of it floating up would cause the beaker to go up, which would tip the scale.
#45 to #1 - buzambo
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
****************************!!!

I made an account just to educate you fools on this ****. If you acutally had a scale and measured a beaker with water AND THEN added a SUBMERGED object (steel ball) you will notice that the value on the scale increased. Additionally if you DROPPED a steel ball in the beaker you will also notice another increase in mass.

To explain this, lets look at pressure. Pressure is force/mass BUT it can also be density*gravity*height AND SINCE THE HEIGHT OF THE WATER CHANGES SO DOES THE PRESSURE thus the force increases because the area doesn't change.

Knowing that the only variable to change the force exerted by the beaker is the height of the liquid AND SINCE the volume of the ping pong ball and steel ball are the same they each displace the SAME AMMOUNT OF WATER thus THE SAME AMOUNT OF MASS.

but wait... the ping pong ball is attached to the beaker... jesus christ people lets assume it doesn't affect the ****. This exercise is meant to test your knowledge of pressure and since i didn't see of that anywhere I had to say something.
#46 to #45 - buzambo
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Plus the ping pong ball is actually relieving some weight from the beaker, not making it heavier. If you tie a balloon to a scale you'll see the value goes to the negative.

Stay in school kids.
#105 to #1 - anon id: 9b0df0fe
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/29/2013) [-]
The correct answer depends on the difference between ping-pong ball mass and mass of water of the same volume as the ball. Total weight on the left is g*(mass of ping-pong ball + mass of water + mass of the beaker), and total weight on the right is g*(mass of water + mass of water displaced by the ball + mass of the beaker). Assuming the ping-pong ball is light (and any real ball is light enough), the balance will tip to the right.
User avatar #10 to #1 - insaneguy
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
it tips to the left.
steel ball is taking up space but imparting no force on scale, so it doesn't matter.
since the beakers are the same as well as the amount of water, the only force left is the ping pong ball.
the beaker on the left is a closed system, so the ball's buoyancy has no effect on the total weight of the beaker.

it comes down to this: is the beaker with a ping pong ball (and string) heavier than the identical beaker without a ball?

answer: yes.
#24 to #10 - soloman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
It imparts force because of buoyancy.
User avatar #97 to #24 - zuflux
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/24/2013) [-]
No, it does not. It's like not gonna have any effect, because it's like trying to lift the ocean floor by putting lots of air balloons tethered to the ocean floor.

To affect the scale it needs to affect the scales from an external device, like pressing up against the bottom of the beaker from under the tipping scale.
#102 to #97 - soloman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/25/2013) [-]
The buoyancy is downward on the beaker. It's not lifting it, it's pushing it down.
User avatar #103 to #102 - zuflux
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/25/2013) [-]
But then it's not called buoyancy. It's simply the fact that the ball weigh's something.
#104 to #103 - soloman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/26/2013) [-]
Well the ball is exerting its weight on the water because the water is pushing up on it due to buoyancy. Equal and opposite reaction.
User avatar #48 to #1 - zuflux
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
The Steel ball is suspended from an organ outside the mechanisms influence, and therefore does not affect the tipping at all.

The ping-pong ball is tethered to the bottom of the beaker by a string, but is filled with air. However, it is not above water, which makes that moot in any case, since being tethered to the container of water itself makes it unlikely that it can lift the very thing holding the water. (See troll-physics - Lifting the world with hot air balloons.) and therefore simply increases the mass and weight of that beaker, causing it to tip to the left.
User avatar #94 to #48 - KazumaKyu
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Thank you! I've been trying and failing to explain why the buoyancy is irrelevant since this whole *********** began.
User avatar #96 to #94 - zuflux
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/24/2013) [-]
I suppose it doesn't make itself very clear to many people at first glance.

But thinking about it for just a while makes it make sense, in the end.

You're welcome, though.
User avatar #55 to #1 - straightbusta
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
I love how ONE POST from an anon did all this.

Don't ever change your genius ways, FJ.
#85 to #1 - kaisermike
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Anon, you deserve the Knight's Cross with Oak leaves XD
Anon, you deserve the Knight's Cross with Oak leaves XD
#23 to #1 - soloman
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Here's the simplest way to look at it. A free body diagram of the containers, water, and balls together. The string in the left system is internal, and doesn't affect external forces at all. The only force omitted is the normal force of the scale, which is what will be the measurement.

The weights of the water and container are the same, so you can ignore those. What ends up mattering is the weights of the balls, which is heavier to the right, and the tension on the right system. The buoyant force wouldn't be nearly enough to support the ball, as steel would sink. Therefore, the ball is mostly supported by the tension. Since they are displacing the same amount of water, their buoyant forces are the same. So if they are at the same height, the tension on the right has to be exactly enough to counter the difference in weight of the steel ball. Therefor, it will remain balanced.
#25 to #23 - soloman
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Wait, why is this even HERE?!

(This comment not his post, I mean. Completely irrelevant. Ah well. SCIENCE!)
User avatar #11 to #1 - Tazdingo
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
****, all these people posting elaborate answers.



I was just going to say "left".
User avatar #6 to #1 - KazumaKyu
Reply +143 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
This problem is really quite simple, once you remove all the extraneous information.
1. The iron ball does not transfer weight to the scale itself, being suspended from above, and is thus completely extraneous.

Only possible options are tipping left and continued equilibrium.

2. The buoyancy of the ping pong ball in no way impedes its mass. If you drop a ping pong ball into a beaker full of water, is it heavier than an identical beaker without a ping pong ball? Of course it is, beaker + water + ball > beaker + water. Why would this change just because the ball is tethered to the bottom of the beaker?

Conclusion: the ping pong ball increases the overall mass of the beaker on the left, and the scale tips accordingly.
User avatar #26 to #6 - myfourthaccount
Reply +42 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
you guys are doing anon's homework and not even realizing it lol
User avatar #62 to #26 - thinegame
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
this is an old one
User avatar #29 to #6 - Maadmann
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
But then also wouldn't the buoyant force of the ping pong ball equalize the force due to the weight of the ball? since it is pulling upwards on the bottom of the beaker?
User avatar #33 to #29 - KazumaKyu
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
I keep arguing this point, and the worst thing is that I totally get where all you guys are coming from. I actually thought the same thing when I first saw the problem, and it took me a few minutes before I realized how foolish I was being.

The bottom line is that a submersed object's buoyancy cannot be transferred to the object containing the liquid in which said buoyant object is immersed. This is true only so long as it remains a closed system, of course. It would be a completely different story if we were measuring the mass the beaker on the left if the entire beaker were itself submerged in water. The ping pong ball cannot buoy the beaker because the beaker is not itself immersed in a substance with a higher density than the air within the ping pong ball.
#40 to #33 - ylegrand
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
the ping pong ball would cause the scales to tip right if it were filled with helium or other lighter than air gasses.
User avatar #34 to #33 - Maadmann
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Gotcha. I feel that.
#36 to #33 - anon id: 5c98a9d5
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
A floating object does not transfer mass but "transfers" force. The force with which the liquid pushes the ball upwards is equal to the additional force with which the liquid presses down on the thing containing the liquid (additional with respect to the case when no ball is in the container) . This is because of action and reaction - the ball is pushed up, so it pushed the liquid down with the same force. If it wouldn't be so, if the liquid would not push on its container, there would be a net resulting force downwards for the liquid => the liquid would move.

The forces on the container on the left: its weight + the weight of the water + the force with which the water pushes the ball upwards - the tension force in the string, which is equal to the previous force minus the ping pong's weight - reaction force of the scale. On the right side there's no tension. The total force difference is weight-of-ping-pong-ball - (Volume of ball) * (density of water)
#38 to #36 - anon id: 5c98a9d5
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Cont: To make you see that the suspended ball DOES influence the right hand side, analyze the metal ball and its suspension system: since it is submerged, there is a force acting on it upwards, therefore the suspension system sees a force equal to the weight of the ball minus the buoyancy force from the liquid. But the ball still has its normal weight. Therefore, only part of the ball is pulled up by the suspension system; the other part is held up by the container. This force is equal to the volume of the ball times the density of the liquid, and is the difference between a container with only water in it and one with a ball. However, since on the other side the difference is only a ping-pong ball weight, and since the ping pong ball floats and has the same volume, it certainly has a smaller weight.

The scale tips to the right.
User avatar #80 to #38 - babyanalraper
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
So to make this understandable If I understand you correctly that is
right side weight = water including the volume of the ball
left side weight = water including the volume of the ball - difference between ball's density and water's density.

Is that correct?
#81 to #80 - anon id: 5c98a9d5
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
i'm a bit afraid to answer someone with your username jk
left side weight = water weight + weight of ping pong ball
right side weight = water weight + virtual weight of a water ball with the same size as the metal ball (and thus as the ping pong ball)
and since the water ball is heavier than the ping pong ball (this is why it floats), the scale tips to the right
User avatar #83 to #81 - babyanalraper
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(11/23/2013) [-]
It says baby, not anonymous, right? Then again, age is but a number...
Right. Isn't weight of water + weight of ball = weight of water with ball sphere - difference between weight of ball and weight of ball of water though?
#86 to #83 - anon id: 5c98a9d5
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Hmm, yes, I guess so, although it is a bit imprecisely stated in the first comment.
Wleft = (Vwater+Vball) * Rowater * g - Vball * (Rowater - Ro_ball) * g

Ro = greek letter, used for density (that's how I learnt it, don't kill me for it)
User avatar #90 to #86 - babyanalraper
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
I guess Smiley to show that I'm not sarcastic or anything Spoiler to hide smiley because FJ hates smileys despite their usefulness in informal communication
That's the p, right?
User avatar #72 to #29 - pokemonstheshiz
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
The buoyant force is going to be equal to the force of gravity plus the force exerted by the string. They will remain in equilibrium, and not change the system.
#57 to #6 - imnotkickthecat
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
#70 to #57 - hektoroftroy
Reply +10 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Did I do it right?
#59 to #57 - tanabata
Reply +6 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Did I do this right?
#87 to #57 - lamarisagoodname
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
GG
#88 to #87 - lamarisagoodname
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
I... I'm such an idiot
I... I'm such an idiot
#107 to #57 - anon id: ff158331
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(08/12/2014) [-]
User avatar #30 to #6 - bonerjam
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
wth i thought this was some kind of deep metaphor of this content
#74 to #6 - chubbies
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Wouldn't the force of the steel ball down offset the balancing beam to the right, though? I'unno, 10th grade science here.
User avatar #99 to #74 - zuflux
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/24/2013) [-]
Nope. Ball of steel is not affecting the scale because it's suspended from an external device.

The ping-pong ball however, is tethered to the glass itself, and therefore introduces weight, however little that may be.

The air inside that ball does nothing to affect this, as it would be like trying to lift the planet by tethering helium balloons (A **** ton of them) then expecting the planet to 'go upwards'. It's a different situation, but the result is the same.
User avatar #56 to #6 - srskate
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Gotta disagree. the string doesn't bear the full weight of the steel ball

I'll explain later, I gotta nap. Basically you are ignoring the buoyant force on the steel ball which is equal to density*volume displaced*g
User avatar #54 to #6 - wardd
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
The buoyant force acting on the steel ball will induce a reaction force newtons thrid law , the steel ball pushes the water down, with the gravitational force of the displaced water. Because water is heavier than the ping pong ball, the scale will tip right.

trust me i'm a physicist
User avatar #31 to #6 - freakyorange
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Yup. My thoughts exactly.

The **** is an extraneous?
User avatar #32 to #31 - KazumaKyu
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
ex·tra·ne·ous
ikˈstrānēəs/Submit
adjective
1.
irrelevant or unrelated to the subject being dealt with.
"one is obliged to wade through many pages of extraneous material"
synonyms: irrelevant, immaterial, beside the point, unrelated, unconnected, inapposite, inapplicable, superfluous More
#108 to #6 - anon id: f0bfe5ff
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/04/2015) [-]
Lovely explanation of a "really quite simple" problem when you remove all the 'extraneous details', but the reality is that your explanation doesn't agree with experiment.

Richard Feynman told me something about that, and I'm going to go with him given he actually achieved something in physics.

It tips to the right.

#76 to #6 - iviagic
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User avatar #91 to #76 - KazumaKyu
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
... I never said there would be equilibrium. I said it would tip left, which agrees with what you said.

Yes the string would add weight, but I felt it was unnecessary to mention this since it wouldn't alter the conclusion.
#92 to #91 - iviagic
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User avatar #98 to #92 - zuflux
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/24/2013) [-]
The ping-pong ball (And string if you must go to such extents of small variables) does introduce weight. The Iron ball does not, as it's suspended from an independent device.

The mass of the ball in itself is more than enough to tip the scale.
#100 to #98 - iviagic
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User avatar #101 to #100 - zuflux
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/24/2013) [-]
It does have weight, but it has no effect on the state of tipping.

Why? It's suspended from a crane, in no way attached to the scales.
Both balls are suspended at the same height, therefore displacement of water is equal at top and bottom. Would a glass of water be heavier to lift if you held an iron ball by a string down into the water as you lifted it? Granted it doesn't touch the bottom of the glass, at which point it will have an effect, as it's directly in contact with the container of water.
User avatar #93 to #92 - KazumaKyu
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
... why are you misunderstanding simple english? We are agreeing with one another on the outcome. There are THREE possible conclusions:

A. Tip Left
B. Maintain Equilibrium
C. Tip Right

The ping pong ball alone makes the scale tip left, meaning the answer is A. Now add in the mass of the string.

The answer... is still A.
#95 to #93 - iviagic
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#66 to #6 - anon id: 6370de20
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
actually its wrong
User avatar #52 to #6 - olesc
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Im not a scientist or anything, but wouldnt the ping pong ball kind of pull the scale and the other side would tip
#43 to #6 - anon id: b69fd3d1
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Nope. If you would atually suspend an object in a beaker of water that was on top of a weight scale you would see that the mass does change. Pressure is force/area but it can also be density*height*gravity and since the water level increased the height increased, thus, mass is transfered to the scale.

Since both ping pong ball and steel ball take up the same space they both actually cause the same increase in mass so boom. BOOOOOOOM. GO BACK TO SCHOOL SUCKA!!!
#16 to #6 - anon id: e5aed8f0
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Wouldn't tip all the way though i'd think, the steel ball would hit the bottom and it would just sit askew, provided there's no spillage anyway. Though that's hardly relevant i suppose, it'd still tip left.
#12 to #6 - anon id: aff8770b
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Assuming that both balls have equal surface area and that both cups are equally filled, then the water that each ball displaces would be the same. The air inside a ping-pong ball is less dense than water and therefore both cups, despite being equally filled, have different total masses. The air less dense air inside the ping-pong ball means that for equal volume, the cup with the ping-pong ball weighs less than the the other cup which has only water contributing to it's weight.
User avatar #15 to #12 - KazumaKyu
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Displacement of mass does not increase it.
User avatar #39 to #6 - huttero
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
actually I think that the force made by the poin pong ball (wich floats, so if its held by a string below it would make force to go up) wil make it tip to the right.
#41 to #39 - collegedood
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
**collegedood rolled a random image posted in comment #9 at I'm your biggest fan **
let us say the beakers are completely empty and set them on the scale. they would equal. then add a ping pong ball to the left one. the left one is now heavier. add the same volume of water to both sides. the side with the ping pong ball still has more mass (even though the ball is lighter than the water below it, it is still heavier than the atmosphere above it)
#7 to #6 - pointer
Reply -5 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
I think what the bouyant force of the ping pong ball would be greater than the weigth of the ball, so that:
FLeft=Fwater+Fping-pong weigth-Fping-pong buoyancy

FRigth=Fwater
Fwater<Fping-pong

F
Left<FRigth[small]

Hope i didn't **** up something with paint
User avatar #9 to #7 - KazumaKyu
Reply +10 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
... The buoyancy of the ball has no affect whatsoever. You are implying that the upward force generated by an object's buoyancy can be somehow transferred to the container the buoyant object is floating in.

Look, it was in my explanation above--if you've got a beaker of water with a ping pong ball floating in it, it will be heavier than a similar beaker filled with a similar amount of water that doesn't have a ping pong ball floating in it. The fact that the ball is tethered to the bottom of the beaker is unimportant, and is only there to confuse you with extraneous data. The whole scale isn't submerged, so the fact that the ping pong ball has buoyancy is completely irrelevant.

If the entire setup were under water, then I would agree that the ping pong ball's buoyancy would outstrip its mass, but since it isn't it's unnecessary information that cannot be factored in if you want to come to a conclusion that isn't wrong.

You have to stop and think about what exactly the ping pong ball is straining against. If we were measuring the mass of an object submerged in water that had a ping pong ball tied to it, I would completely agree that the ball's buoyancy would create the illusion that the object was suddenly composed of less mass. But because the object whose mass is being measured (the beaker) is not also submerged in a substance with greater density than the air within the ping pong ball, the ball's buoyancy cannot be taken into account.

How about this, let's scale it up: let's say you're tethered to the bottom of an aquarium, and you've got a lungful of air. Because of that lungful of air, your body has a certain buoyancy. Claiming that the ping pong ball would effectively lessen the mass of the beaker is exactly the same as saying an aquarium would be lighter if you were tied to its floor.
#17 to #9 - soloman
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Actually he's right, but wrong. The buoyant force and tension would affect the container, but in opposite directions of how he drew them. Newtons second law. The force has to have a reaction, and for the buoyancy this is the water, and for the tension it's the bottom of the container. Both of which will affect the reading of the scale.

The reason the container would get heavier with a ping pong ball floating in it, as you mentioned in your first comment, is because the reaction in the water to the buoyant force of the ball.

So you're both right, you more so than he, but he has a point, even if it was redundant.
User avatar #19 to #17 - KazumaKyu
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
The beaker on the left is a closed system, and thus the buoyancy in no way exerts force on the scale itself, making it unimportant in the determining of the beaker's mass.
#20 to #19 - soloman
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
It's not closed, it's exerting a normal force on the scale, which is where the measurement comes from.
User avatar #21 to #20 - KazumaKyu
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Yes, it is closed. The force generated by buoyancy is only relative to the water around it and does not exert itself upon anything outside of that system. Because the scale itself is not also submerged, the left beaker is a closed system.
#22 to #21 - soloman
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
The force is exerted on the water, which in turn the water must exert on something else to remain at 0 net force. So the force is exerted on the water, which is exerted on the container, which is then exerted on the scale. If there's external forces, it's not a closed system. The water can't just apply forces to the ball without affecting anything else.
#8 to #7 - pointer
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
And i **** up the final statement.
****
#14 - pappathethird
Reply +96 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
#27 - soopergrover
Reply +48 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
I see man ass.
I see man ass.
User avatar #5 - hoponthefeelstrain
Reply +19 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
I think having the people who washed your car steal your change is ****** up, no matter how nice your car is. You just don't take things that don't belong to you. That's first grade 101.
#47 - falconxmard
Reply +9 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
**falconxmard rolled a random comment #32 posted by deathrinder at MFW leaving the womb ** :
#75 to #47 - urbancohort
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#51 - MrDeadiron
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
That she was white.
User avatar #44 - thebestpieever
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Holy ****, someone who actually gets the first world problems meme. That is so rare.
#79 - tragicrhapsody
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Comment Picture
User avatar #61 - wrocky
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
in all fairness.. I would be pissed off if someone stole my car change when I get it cleaned.. big or small I'm pretty particular when it comes to something being stolen.. it says a lot about the person
User avatar #35 - anonefgthree
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
**** the first and 4th panels are just like my sister
User avatar #37 to #35 - toadkillerdog
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/23/2013) [-]
Mine used to do that, but then I made sure to take a bunch of pictures whenever I went hunting, so whenever she complains about something not being organic or low calorie enough I just whip em out and start to tell her about all the ticks and the **** that falls out as I was carving it up. She shuts up.
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