its a math joke. i hope you get it.. mfw i cant do this math its a math joke i hope you get it mfw cant do this
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> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
#1 - thebeastlyhound
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(01/26/2013) [-]
mfw i cant do this math
mfw i cant do this math
#2 to #1 - dunadan
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(01/26/2013) [-]
let me help you. The little mark --> ' <-- means "differentiated". (sorry if its spelled wrong... English is not my first language)
User avatar #7 - supersimpsonman
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(01/27/2013) [-]
I can't math, stop making me math.

But seriously, don't bring Calc into my Calc wasting time.
#8 - anon id: 8f6a2820
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/06/2013) [-]
i read that as
optimus minute



User avatar #3 - stultum
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(01/26/2013) [-]
so the original optimius must have been:

1/2 optimus^2+c.

anyone any idea what the c could be? or is it 0?
User avatar #4 to #3 - anonymoose
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(01/27/2013) [-]
c can be any number.
#5 to #3 - datargumme
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(01/27/2013) [-]
A constant alone is allways 0 when diffrentiated.
Since when you diffrentiate you find how (steep?) the tangent of the equation is.
Pic related, it is how you diffrentiate.
User avatar #6 to #5 - stultum
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(01/27/2013) [-]
lol, I know how to differentiate. I was talking about the primitive of optimus prime'.

that 's why I ask what the constant of optimus prime could be- you can't know from the differentiated formula. OPTIMUS PRIME would be even more uncertain.