Question. reuploaded due to it being cut off the first time Made this because my comments were thumbed down when I said "the hammer" and explained why
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Question

reuploaded due to it being cut off the first time

Made this because my comments were thumbed down when I said "the hammer" and explained why

+1
Views: 3006
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Submitted: 01/19/2013
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+2
#10 - zmbz **User deleted account** has deleted their comment [+] (12 replies)
#45 - princessharry (01/21/2013) [+] (5 replies)
Simple thought experiment here for you. Only equations you need are F = GMm/r^2 and a = F/m

Two spheres alone in the universe, both mass of 2 kg, 1 m apart
In another parallel universe, both have a mass of 4 kg, 1 m apart

In which universe would the spheres take less time to collide due to the force of gravity between them?

Id say it would be the more massive spheres because the force between them is larger and things with larger gravity attract other things more strongly right? ... until I do the maths.

Assume G=1 because its common to both equations so doesn't actually matter.

universe 1 F=(1x2x2)/1^2 = 4 then use a = f/m so 4/2 = 2 m/s^2
universe 2 F=(1x4x4)/1^2 = 8 then use a = f/m so 8/4 = 2 m/s^2

even if both bodies are free to move, still hit each other at same time, just to prove a point, blow the mass of the spheres to that of a star: 2x10^30

F=(1 x 2x10^30 x 2x10^30)/1^2 = 4x10^60 then a=f/m so 4x10^60/ 2x10^30 = 2 m/s^2.

Intuition can be a bitch sometimes.

#7 - ClicheUsername (01/20/2013) [+] (18 replies)
Have you ever even taken physics?

Gravity works the same on all objects, regardless of the mass of the object. No object has more gravity than another and gravity is an acceleration, not a force.

And you cant say that the hammer has a greater acceleration of gravity because that is constant, it may have a larger force of gravity, but that is based off of the acceleration of gravity and the mass of the object.


It boils down to the acceleration of gravity acts on all objects the same so the hammer and feather would hit the surface of the moon at the same time because there is no air resistance causing the feather to sway back and forth. The air resistance is based off the composition of each object and the surface area.

Try dropping a flat sheet of paper and a crumbled sheet of paper in a ball. Same mass and the same acceleration of gravity working on each, but the air resistance working on the flat sheet of paper causes it to sway and hit the ground after the crumbled piece.
#27 to #21 - ClicheUsername (01/20/2013) [-]
But...it is still wrong. Your theory has the Earth or Moon moving towards objects faster than others. Youre basically saying that the Earth will move faster towards a 10 kg object dropped in the US compared to a 5 kg object in Russia and even slower towards a 2 kg object in Australia.

Now, does that make any sense what so ever?
User avatar #1 - bahbumfuck (01/19/2013) [-]
TL;DR version: Hammers are heavy
#58 - Womens Study Major (02/23/2013) [-]
This is correct but the difference is tiny. For the sake of not confusing people you would generally say that they land at the same time because it demonstrates the principle that gravity increases according to mass but mass requires more force to accelerate so acceleration is constant without friction.
#42 - Rellikthebrit (01/21/2013) [+] (1 reply)
Wow 						****					 storm below. but forgive me if i am wrong. but the force on the hammer and the mood and the feather are figured out from the equation F=GMm/r^2 if i can remember my A-Level maths correctly. F also equals Ma. but that means that the force requires an acceleration. and acceleration is not proportional to velocity if u=0. As acceleration is provided by the mass of the moon.If it were you would be talking about momentum. and that is not proportional to a. therefore can we assume that if they are dropped from the same height. and there is no air resistance the will fall at the same speed. I might be wrong but that's my understanding of it.
Wow **** storm below. but forgive me if i am wrong. but the force on the hammer and the mood and the feather are figured out from the equation F=GMm/r^2 if i can remember my A-Level maths correctly. F also equals Ma. but that means that the force requires an acceleration. and acceleration is not proportional to velocity if u=0. As acceleration is provided by the mass of the moon.If it were you would be talking about momentum. and that is not proportional to a. therefore can we assume that if they are dropped from the same height. and there is no air resistance the will fall at the same speed. I might be wrong but that's my understanding of it.
#33 - nommybaby (01/21/2013) [+] (3 replies)
allow me to direct your attention to the video proving you wrong. the hammer and feather hit the surface at the same time.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=5C5_dOEyAfk
#9 - aleomonoia (01/20/2013) [+] (1 reply)
If it's a vaccume they will fall the same time. if it's not the hammer will fall first because the feather will slow down from the air. Btw didn't read it becuase it's too long and you didn't even gave a potato
#8 - anticitezenone (01/20/2013) [-]
I didn't read that

but that sounds cool.
#2 - MrHare (01/20/2013) [+] (3 replies)
"The hammer has a higher gravity than the feather"







No.
#51 - qwerteh (01/22/2013) [+] (2 replies)
The hammer and feather situation is completely situational, and since you're taking into account that the moon is a free body, you are forced to also take into account that the moon is not a flat surface and is in fact curved. This means that if you drop two objects side by side then one will obviously hit the ground first, because it is closer to the surface. To counteract this say that the objects are dropped from exact opposite points on the moon, and say the moon is a uniform object to make things easy. This means that the first part of what you said is true, the moon will have an ever so slight acceleration towards the hammer. BUT the hammer also exerts a force on the feather which is on the other side of the planet, and that additional acceleration that the hammer applies to the feather is just enough so that they are falling towards the moon (taking the moon as the point of reference) at exactly the same rate, meaning that they will in fact hit the ground and exactly the same time, since after all this is a vacuum and air resistance is not a factor.

Nice try though.

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