LOL it's very true. .. This is correct. Schrödinger's Cat is actually Schrödinger's metaphor for why he thought the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics is a joke. This is e
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User avatar #2 - usernamesaredumb (01/26/2013) [+] (2 replies)
This is correct. Schrödinger's Cat is actually Schrödinger's metaphor for why he thought the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics is a joke. This is easily found in the first paragraph of it's Wikipedia article, but nobody reads that **** , they just want to equate cats with science and feel smug while they sip their Starbucks and watch the post they made about it on fagbook.
#4 - theblockhead (01/26/2013) [+] (6 replies)
i would like to understand this, but there are alot of weird terms in that. can someone explain in simple words please?
#5 to #4 - TheFreak (01/26/2013) [-]
There is a cat in a box with a vial of poison that may be broken at any moment. Until the box is opened, we will not know if the cat is dead or alive, so we may theoretically assume the cat to be both dead and alive.   
   
<The cat they tried to put in the box
There is a cat in a box with a vial of poison that may be broken at any moment. Until the box is opened, we will not know if the cat is dead or alive, so we may theoretically assume the cat to be both dead and alive.

<The cat they tried to put in the box
User avatar #1 - techketzer (01/26/2013) [-]
People, read this.
Stop making a joke of serious science.
#14 - bananajoe (01/27/2013) [+] (1 reply)
I kinda hate that the big bang theory made this so famous

now everyone and his mother is running arround like the guy in the bottom picture
#21 - weinerdick (01/27/2013) [+] (3 replies)
Is it really that hard to give credit?
Every time I see anything from www.smbc-comics.com/ I NEVER see credit.
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#6 - whitemager **User deleted account** has deleted their comment [+] (8 replies)
#7 to #6 - batleth (01/27/2013) [-]
There is a 50% chance that the radiation will be emitted. However, even if it is emitted, it does not directly harm the cat (it's only a small amount) but it does set off the hammer that breaks the glass releasing the poison.
So there is a 50% chance that the cat is alive, 50% chance that it's dead. Until someone opens the box and sees what happened, the two states are superimposed, making the cat both alive and dead at the same time.
User avatar #38 - pseudobob **User deleted account** (01/27/2013) [-]
My interpretation is it's a metaphor for quantum probability, in that you can't be certain the cat is dead or alive until you look inside (because, the way I heard it, it's a soundproofed, opaque box, and the geiger counter controls something that kills the cat directly.) Similar to how electrons behave as waves when not observed, but as particles when observed.
User avatar #34 - weejer (01/27/2013) [-]
basically, the cat is considered alive, if you base your answer on the condition of the cat the last time you saw it. but if you look in the box, you find the cat is dead. until then, the cat is considered alive, but you know its dead.

that doesnt sound right
User avatar #33 - malhaloc ONLINE (01/27/2013) [-]
The way I understood it when I first heard it was we don't know if the cat is alive or dead, so we say both until we know for sure.
#31 - fefe (01/27/2013) [-]
I do not know what you would think to happen in this little experiment exept for a dead cat. This is not a paradox, and there are certianly simpler ways to kill a cat.

However, it would be interesting to see what someone who saw the box after-the-fact with no prior knowlage the previous circumstances would make of the contraption; a poisoned cat next to a broken pile of glass near a nugget of Radium with a gieger counter connected to a hammer, all in a little box.



User avatar #25 - winsauceiswin (01/27/2013) [-]
i always thought that this paradox was an example of the heisenberg uncertainty principle....oh well lol.
User avatar #22 - digits (01/27/2013) [-]
What?
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