LOL it's very true. .. This is correct. Schrödinger's Cat is actually Schrödinger's metaphor for why he thought the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics is a joke. This is e
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LOL it's very true

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Submitted: 01/26/2013
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User avatar #38 - pseudobob **User deleted account** (01/27/2013) [-]
My interpretation is it's a metaphor for quantum probability, in that you can't be certain the cat is dead or alive until you look inside (because, the way I heard it, it's a soundproofed, opaque box, and the geiger counter controls something that kills the cat directly.) Similar to how electrons behave as waves when not observed, but as particles when observed.
User avatar #34 - weejer (01/27/2013) [-]
basically, the cat is considered alive, if you base your answer on the condition of the cat the last time you saw it. but if you look in the box, you find the cat is dead. until then, the cat is considered alive, but you know its dead.

that doesnt sound right
User avatar #33 - malhaloc (01/27/2013) [-]
The way I understood it when I first heard it was we don't know if the cat is alive or dead, so we say both until we know for sure.
#31 - anonymous (01/27/2013) [-]
I do not know what you would think to happen in this little experiment exept for a dead cat. This is not a paradox, and there are certianly simpler ways to kill a cat.

However, it would be interesting to see what someone who saw the box after-the-fact with no prior knowlage the previous circumstances would make of the contraption; a poisoned cat next to a broken pile of glass near a nugget of Radium with a gieger counter connected to a hammer, all in a little box.



User avatar #25 - winsauceiswin (01/27/2013) [-]
i always thought that this paradox was an example of the heisenberg uncertainty principle....oh well lol.
User avatar #22 - digits (01/27/2013) [-]
What?
#21 - weinerdick (01/27/2013) [-]
Is it really that hard to give credit?
Every time I see anything from www.smbc-comics.com/ I NEVER see credit.
User avatar #27 to #21 - nevrit (01/27/2013) [-]
You should really give credit to OneyNG for that picture
User avatar #35 to #27 - weinerdick (01/27/2013) [-]
I'm not posting content for thumbs, nor am I trying to take credit for it, smart ass
User avatar #36 to #35 - nevrit (01/27/2013) [-]
No **** , at least you got the part about being a smartass.
#14 - bananajoe (01/27/2013) [-]
I kinda hate that the big bang theory made this so famous

now everyone and his mother is running arround like the guy in the bottom picture
#19 to #14 - anonymous (01/27/2013) [-]
I feel the same, except with the quote about the meaning of insanity and Far Cry.
0
#6 - whitemager **User deleted account** has deleted their comment [-]
#9 to #6 - batleth (01/27/2013) [-]
and if you think that's absurd, well, that was Schronger's point. He was comparing this scenario of a cat being both alive and dead with the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics which states that quantum particles exist in all their possible states simultaneously, until they are observed. (when they're observed the superposition collapses and the object is forced into one of the states of its wave function)
#10 to #9 - batleth (01/27/2013) [-]
*Scrodinger's
goddammit
#7 to #6 - batleth (01/27/2013) [-]
There is a 50% chance that the radiation will be emitted. However, even if it is emitted, it does not directly harm the cat (it's only a small amount) but it does set off the hammer that breaks the glass releasing the poison.
So there is a 50% chance that the cat is alive, 50% chance that it's dead. Until someone opens the box and sees what happened, the two states are superimposed, making the cat both alive and dead at the same time.
#4 - theblockhead (01/26/2013) [-]
i would like to understand this, but there are alot of weird terms in that. can someone explain in simple words please?
#5 to #4 - TheFreak (01/26/2013) [-]
There is a cat in a box with a vial of poison that may be broken at any moment. Until the box is opened, we will not know if the cat is dead or alive, so we may theoretically assume the cat to be both dead and alive.   
   
<The cat they tried to put in the box
There is a cat in a box with a vial of poison that may be broken at any moment. Until the box is opened, we will not know if the cat is dead or alive, so we may theoretically assume the cat to be both dead and alive.

<The cat they tried to put in the box
#24 to #5 - anonymous (01/27/2013) [-]
i understand that the thing I don't understand is why it's useful to know that. Is it quantum mechanics or what's the point of being able to say it's both alive and dead
User avatar #28 to #24 - seniorpokeman (01/27/2013) [-]
It was used to insult the Copenhagen Interpretation. I don't fully grasp what the Copenhagen Interpretation is, but what I think it is is basically saying "we need to focus on the probabilities of what could possibly be instead of data, because there are chances of getting something completely different than what we should with the data we interpret." Schrödinger, an Austrian physicist, though this was ******* retarded, and created the idea of a cat in a box that could be killed at any time. Reading the data while using the methods that the Copenhagen Interpretation called for, he concluded that the cat inside the box was both living and dead. An answer that is obviously false, but, while using the Copenhagen Interpretation, the answer you'l get.

tl;dr: Schrödinger thought that the people using something called the Copenhagen method were retarded, and made an experiment using their method for problem solving that would obviously give him an incorrect answer, hoping that people would agree that the CI was idiotic.
#32 to #28 - anonymous (01/27/2013) [-]
Schrodinger used something else besides the cat to accomplish his purpose, but I heard when he was asked about it he was drunk and came up with this whole cat idea which kind of explained it. He was pretty embarrased i think
User avatar #37 to #32 - seniorpokeman (01/27/2013) [-]
I'd be proud if I were him. He created an experiment that could collapse the foundation of a physics interpretation used by dozens of impressive physicists while ******* hammered. If that's not impressive, I don't know what is.
#8 to #5 - anonymous (01/27/2013) [-]
Because of uncertainty inherent in the system itself, until a measurement is made, the radioactive material will simultaneously emit and not emit radiation. Meaning the cat both has been killed and hasn't. It is only force to be one or the other once a measurement is made.
User avatar #2 - usernamesaredumb (01/26/2013) [-]
This is correct. Schrödinger's Cat is actually Schrödinger's metaphor for why he thought the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics is a joke. This is easily found in the first paragraph of it's Wikipedia article, but nobody reads that **** , they just want to equate cats with science and feel smug while they sip their Starbucks and watch the post they made about it on fagbook.
User avatar #23 to #2 - infamoustrapper ONLINE (01/27/2013) [-]
but...in schools (or atleast when they taught it to me) they taught it the bottom way....is my life a lie? if i cant trust school then what do i believe in....
User avatar #3 to #2 - stultum (01/26/2013) [-]
the big fun is that it is now often used to explain the copenhagen explanation.
User avatar #1 - techketzer (01/26/2013) [-]
People, read this.
Stop making a joke of serious science.
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