gets me every time. to real.... My grandpa suffered from Alzheimer' s in his later years. ft never really affected me, since it seemed like the "funny" kind of  sad
Upload
Login or register

gets me every time

Click to block a category:GamingPoliticsNewsComicsAnimeOther
Tags: sad
My grandpa suffered from Alzheimer' s in his later years. ft never really affected me, since it seemed like the "funny" kind of Alzheimer' s. A lot of "Oh, Grandpa!" moments, like when he can' t
remember how to tie his shoes, or how to use the microwave.
After a while, though, it started getting worse. He couldn' t recognize my voice otter the phone, for example. But there was one moment that made me realize how far gone my grandfather
was.
He picked up a framed picture of him and my grandmother, who had passed away four years prior. He stared at it blankly, and I lightheartedly asked, "You like that picture, eh, Grandpa?"
He paused before replying: "Anon... who are these people?"
I froze. My grandfather couldn' t remember what his wife of years looked like. He couldn' t remember what HE looked like.
I said, "Grandpa, that' s you and Grandma. Don' t you remember?"
Again, he paused. And then he began to cry, and said, choking on , "No, Anon, no, I don' t. I don' t remember! I can' t remember! Why can' t I remember?"
ts the Alzheimer' s, Grandpa. You' re losing your memories, a-"
Alzheimer' s, I don' t care! I lived a life, I worked hard, I existed! I should know it, shouldn' t I?"
There was a long pause before he muttered: "Anon... I' m scared."
I don' t want to die."
We cried for hours.
...
+395
Views: 21765 Submitted: 05/19/2014
Hide Comments
Leave a comment Refresh Comments (60)
[ 60 comments ]
Anonymous comments allowed.
asd
#6 - batsbak
Reply +77 123456789123345869
(05/19/2014) [-]
Normally I'm quite immune to feel stories. But this one got to me, possibly because I too have a grandpa that is on the verge of leaving us.
#20 to #6 - KnowinglyUnknown
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
My grandfather passed last summer. It is rough. If I have any advice to give, it is to be there to at least say goodbye, regardless of what physical/mental state he is in.    
   
Not getting the chance to say goodbye is my biggest regret to this day.
My grandfather passed last summer. It is rough. If I have any advice to give, it is to be there to at least say goodbye, regardless of what physical/mental state he is in.

Not getting the chance to say goodbye is my biggest regret to this day.
User avatar #8 - Ombra
Reply +17 123456789123345869
(05/19/2014) [-]
At least he was cognitive. My grandmother's Alzheimers has progressed to full blown, late stage dementia. She remembers very little, and she can barely speak any english. I have to learn French just so I know that I have to change my grandmothers diaper. I cry about it everyday.
User avatar #32 to #8 - uncledick
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
I'm really sorry about that, I only have one grandparent left. Although, he is relatively healthy, I am scared for him to die because he is 84 years old. I also had a grandmother who spoke French and English, she was French-Canadian and had an accent. Is your grandmother also French?
User avatar #57 to #32 - Ombra
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
Yeah, she's French-Canadian. She's from a village outside of Quebec. What about yours?
User avatar #58 to #57 - uncledick
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
I believe she was from Quebec also. My grandfather was from Ontario but he died before I was born. My grandmother who spoke French died in November of 2012 from a stroke.
User avatar #59 to #58 - Ombra
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
Damn that sucks, man. I'm real sorry to hear that.
User avatar #60 to #59 - uncledick
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/21/2014) [-]
Thanks, the sad thing is, she needed to die. She was born 1917 and was 95 when she passed away. She was loving and nice but her mind was off her whole life, especially as she got older. She thought my dad owned a golf course and that my aunt owned a trailer park and we were hiding money from her.
#19 to #8 - ihateemo
Reply +9 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
don't hit someone with your "atleast" ****.

Don't try and gain sympathy from others because your grandmother is suffering as well. I am sorry man I really am sorry about your grandmother but it is so ******* disrespectful of you to try and make your situation sound worse by comparing it and even worse using the sarcastic tone of "atleast".

if someone had come up to you and said "atleast you knew your grandmother" how would you feel? Don't be disrespectful.

Again i truly am sorry about your grandmothers health.

User avatar #56 to #19 - Ombra
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
I'm not trying to "steal attention" dude. My ******* grandmother is going to die no matter what sympathy anyone gives to me, and when she dies, she won't know who any of us are. She won't remember the Halloween costumes she used to make us, she won't remember all the times she used to slip us money so we could go out with our friends after school. She won't remember my name, or anybody else. I would ******* KILL for her to be cognitive. The above story isn't even OP's story, it's a post from /b/. I understand your point, and if it was OP's story, I would have made my post comparative. Idk if this is true for OP as well, but I was just sharing my story.

And sympathy is going to giver her her smile back, so you can keep it.
User avatar #2 - ToastRider
Reply +15 123456789123345869
(05/19/2014) [-]
My grandma died of alzheimer's .
once , my dad (her son) and my mom took her to the hospital for a check up
my grandma asked my mom who is the guy she came with and wheres her son...

also , on the day she died , a few hours beforehand, she got herself back , she talked to my dad ,asking him what can she do in this world without memories, she cant even recognize money , she cant even go to the bathroom by herself. she said noone deserves to live like this. after my dad and my mom calmed her down ,she went to sleep, and died.
User avatar #3 to #2 - shadowkingdr
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(05/19/2014) [-]
how exactly do you die of Alzheimer's?
User avatar #5 to #3 - mayhemlogic
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(05/19/2014) [-]
An individual with the disease usually loses function of their body over time as it advances. Not a lot is known of the reason for this though
#41 to #3 - anon id: 6aae1bc7
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
Maybe a heart attack from the depression that the disease brings?
#31 - boxofwonderz
Reply +9 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
My great-grandma was funny when she got alzheimers. She was 90 the day she died, but up until that point she was fine. She was just VERY forgetful. So what we would do is sit down and tell her a joke. Wait ten minutes and tell it again. She would laugh like she had never heard it. We could sit there for hours and do that, both of us enjoying it. She also would try to teach us curse words in Italian for some reason. Only bad part was she would always ask what our age was.   
   
Also she thought computers where amazing (if only she could see them now)
My great-grandma was funny when she got alzheimers. She was 90 the day she died, but up until that point she was fine. She was just VERY forgetful. So what we would do is sit down and tell her a joke. Wait ten minutes and tell it again. She would laugh like she had never heard it. We could sit there for hours and do that, both of us enjoying it. She also would try to teach us curse words in Italian for some reason. Only bad part was she would always ask what our age was.

Also she thought computers where amazing (if only she could see them now)
User avatar #47 to #31 - nativninja
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
'if only she could see them now' actually hit me hard. my grandma also was fascinated by the Nintendo DS, so I can relate.
#16 - unicornattacks
Reply +9 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
#22 - dovakiin
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
My grandpa also had Alzheimer's. He only recognized me out of my siblings because I looked so much like my dad, his son.
My grandpa also had Alzheimer's. He only recognized me out of my siblings because I looked so much like my dad, his son.
User avatar #23 - mechgeek
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
My grandfather was the greatest man I knew, he could fill an entire room with just his personality. I could probably fill this entire site section with fond memories I have from him from childhood, and fill this entire website with stories I've read from other people - and all of them are amazing and happy. But I'll keep this short.
He was an astonishingly intelligent and talkative man, he had a photographic memory and would tell you an interesting story about any subject or topic you could think of. But after he had his stroke he barely talked, would barely answer questions and he just became this lesser version of himself, but with slight echos still there. Those stories became mumbles, his personality became feeble, his memory turned to forgetfulness. But if you looked into his eyes you could see that he would try so hard to be him, it's like he was stuck in a cage trying to get out.
He was also one of the people to help write lord of the rings 'The Inklings', he helped come up with elvish, was taught by tolkien at university, could speak elvish and was friends with everyone in that group. He was very dear friends with the other inklings and has diaries and memoirs talking about all of them with so much fondness. In the nursing home he'd still get letters. And one day he got a letter, read it and was stunned with silence - he couldn't utter a word and was shaking, as if this piece of paper was keeping him afloat in the middle of an ocean. Of course my gran and aunt asked him what it was, and he was just about to answer 'It's the inklings, they're having a reunion at the old pub - they want me there.' it was the closest thing that anyone had seen of him being himself since the stroke. He wanted so badly to see them, but because of his condition none of the medical staff would go with him because it was too much of a risk.
He never got to see any of the inklings, he died months afterwards.
User avatar #38 to #23 - supercookieduster
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
damn that's sad. same thing happened to my grandpa. he didn't know my name after the stroke
#51 - xrangerx
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
Comment Picture
#30 - itsmewaffle
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(05/20/2014) [-]
Thanks OP.
#7 - thesweetscientist
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(05/19/2014) [-]
God ******* damn it...