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User avatar #5 - Muppetz
Reply +174 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
Who knows what he's signing?
#347 to #5 - anon id: 93fe6c73
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/27/2013) [-]
I'm here to ruin this.
#243 to #5 - anon id: 2ec11b4d
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
can someone explain this? :/
#185 to #5 - davidteninch
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
Comment Picture
#98 to #5 - xpyrofire **User deleted account**
Reply +22 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
I am actually deaf and knows sign language. What he says is kinda like "What's that sound? I saw!" That young boy don't know how to sign appropriate. Often, you had to look at people's faces when they are signing. Also, sign languages are meaningless without face expressions.
User avatar #277 to #98 - zgbgydug
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
This is something that just crossed my mind.

If you don't use speech, why do you use slang such as "kinda" or "gonna"?

It's a way of lazy talking. I guess it's shorter in text form too, but doesn't it make little sense without knowing how it sounds?
#349 to #277 - xpyrofire **User deleted account**
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/27/2013) [-]
We do use slangs without knowing how they sounds. Statistically, it's hard for deaf people to learn about grammar and English rules. I went to a private school for deaf before and transferred to a public school for a better education. I just graduated at last Friday from high school. Then I had a cochlear implant surgery 2 days ago.

User avatar #270 to #98 - eattacos
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
Its all in the eyebrows, man.

When I sign with people, people who are of hearing make fun of our eyebrow movements. I even started noticing them, and its hilarious.
User avatar #86 to #5 - ilostmyoldaccount
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
it looks like cued speech, i'm deaf and use cochlear implants, i grew up with cued speech for a bit bu then got good enough with spoken english that i forgot how to sign
#125 to #86 - batwill **User deleted account**
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
Does that put your hearing on par with the rest of the hearing population? See, my girlfriend is studying to be an ASL interpreter and has very strong feelings against implants like that, mainly citing them as removing people from the deaf culture but not making them fully hearing and leaving them outsiders from both groups, as well as the potential to cause infections. Sorry to burst in questioning, I'm curious about how you feel about them.
#350 to #125 - xpyrofire **User deleted account**
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/27/2013) [-]
It's sad, really. I noticed some deaf parents wanted their children to be born deaf... Like wth? The deaf people's logic is lot different than hearing people. My parents are deaf. They have never went to a school once. They grew up in Puerto Rico with poor families who don't bother to give them education. It's hard to live with your uneducated deaf parents.

About cochlear implants, **** deaf people who are against it. Like it's my decision.

Popular reasons why deaf people are against cochlear implant:
1. ASL could probably become meaningless.
2. They are afraid of losing deaf cultures.
3. They don't want other parents' to put cochlear implants on babies.

I told my parents that just because I am getting a cochlear implant don't mean I will stop use ASL. I enjoy our deaf culture.
User avatar #134 to #125 - ilostmyoldaccount
Reply +13 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
yea, it kinda does exclude you from both worlds, but you're still fully involved in the hearing world. and the thing about infections is extremely biased, seeing that infections are a constant risk to anybody who ever had surgery, or a open wound. In my honest opinion, i hate people who believe that CI's are horrible, my parents were black mailed numerous times by many Deaf people. There is nothing wrong with not wanting it, but that doesn't mean you should force those who want a CI out of the culture completely. I have great respect for those who decide to become interpreters because thats what got me through half my life, but ask you're GF this: if a blind person was given the option to have a bionic eye that gave him the possibility of sight after being blind for almost all their life, with a risk of failure resulting in no sight gained, leaving him where he was before. I believe a good chance is that that person would say "yes." being deaf is missing one of your 5 senses, so is being blind. i don't see how Deaf culture hates Ci's. im ready for red thumbs
User avatar #142 to #134 - laughdamnyou
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
I'm a signlanguage interpreter, and I think people should choose for themselves. BUT my problem is that the doctors (at least in my country) don't give good enough information. A lot of people think they wil get the same quality of sounds like hearing, but you don't. The doctors also reccomend they don't use sign because that will "ruin" their spoken language, but studies show the opposite. CI is just a complicated hearing head, a great help for many. IMO Sry about long text...
User avatar #317 to #142 - ilostmyoldaccount
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/27/2013) [-]
yea, that is very true, although the signing thing really depends on how much it is used and if it's used to help the child learn spoken word. i didn't learn ASL growing up, but i learned Cued Speech, which is what i believe the boy is using in that video.
#143 to #134 - batwill **User deleted account**
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
I don't know if most of FJ is aware of the issue enough for red thumbs, but that was very insightful, I appreciate a new opinion. Here, have a cute gif for your trouble.
I don't know if most of FJ is aware of the issue enough for red thumbs, but that was very insightful, I appreciate a new opinion. Here, have a cute gif for your trouble.
#55 to #5 - duckstep
Reply -8 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
"DEEEEEEEEEEERP"
#45 to #5 - jakols
Reply +64 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
Something in the lines of
" (Wow,there [the pointing]), I heard the voice, come out of his mouth, just now"

i take it that he is not signing fluid due to his age, but it's roughly how i would have translated it if it was Ida who signed me. (a friends niece)
#87 to #45 - Penn
-8 123456789123345869
has deleted their comment [-]
#133 to #87 - anon id: 56957be8
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
Yes, as in ''FLUIDLY'' as in perfectly, you DUMBASS.
#132 to #87 - telfyr
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
whats so special about the word fluid?
#147 to #132 - anon id: 26b39ef1
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
it means to flow easily
User avatar #41 to #5 - fingernails
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
I'm not really sure he is signing anything, the closest signs I could make out were "He voice/talk mad he" but he was deaf so he wouldn't know what a mad voice sounds like.
User avatar #23 to #5 - marsupilami
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger.
#9 to #5 - jizzabell
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(06/26/2013) [-]
Pretty sure he said awesome.