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User avatar #79 - hugora (06/19/2014) [-]
I have a friend that works as an english/spanish teacher in High school. He's been in Japan for about 6 years, I think (He married a local).

He told me that other faculty don't take you seriously if you're foreign. For example, when they have meetings and he wants to contribute or speak his mind they would just toss him aside and completely disregard his opinion. Did you encounter any similar problems?

Sorry about the grammar. English is not my 1st language.
#85 to #79 - bizengaust ONLINE (06/19/2014) [-]
you are forgiven as English isn't my first language either. This sort of thing certainly happens in the workplace. About three years after I started there was an opening for tutoring at an all boys school not far from where I lived for the summer.  The students where mostly from bad parts of town who needed extra tutoring to help them pass. I felt in my heart that I really wanted to reach out to them and show them it didn't matter where you came from, that you could still make a difference in life, but when I applied the director of the school told me they wanted someone Japanese because only Japanese people could understand them.   
It didn't matter that I had experience teaching kids of troubled back rounds in the states, all they saw was this foreign girl. Thankfully not every company does this and I've since gone to work for one that offers equal chances for everyone regardless of origin.  The person who they picked for that school over me quit after two weeks because they just couldn't handle troubled kids. To this day it annoys me.
you are forgiven as English isn't my first language either. This sort of thing certainly happens in the workplace. About three years after I started there was an opening for tutoring at an all boys school not far from where I lived for the summer. The students where mostly from bad parts of town who needed extra tutoring to help them pass. I felt in my heart that I really wanted to reach out to them and show them it didn't matter where you came from, that you could still make a difference in life, but when I applied the director of the school told me they wanted someone Japanese because only Japanese people could understand them.
It didn't matter that I had experience teaching kids of troubled back rounds in the states, all they saw was this foreign girl. Thankfully not every company does this and I've since gone to work for one that offers equal chances for everyone regardless of origin. The person who they picked for that school over me quit after two weeks because they just couldn't handle troubled kids. To this day it annoys me.
User avatar #92 to #85 - hugora (06/19/2014) [-]
I see. That's a shame. I've always wanted to go to Japan and live there for at least a year. Thankfully there are people who are willing to give equal opportunities to anyone. But still, hearing stories like this is a bit discouraging.
Thanks for the reply. Love the content.
User avatar #84 to #79 - somethingpants (06/19/2014) [-]
Your English is pretty great. It is actually a lot better than some people I know.
User avatar #88 to #84 - bizengaust ONLINE (06/19/2014) [-]
your very kind to say so. When I was still in the states It wasn't so hard since I was surrounded but the language but in Japan I work extra extra hard to make sure it doesn't slip from my head.
User avatar #91 to #88 - somethingpants (06/19/2014) [-]
I actually just saw that long paragraph you just wrote to hugora and I swear if I had to write that in another language I would probably just start crying. XD
User avatar #87 to #84 - hugora (06/19/2014) [-]
Thank you. I appreciate it.
User avatar #90 to #87 - somethingpants (06/19/2014) [-]
No problem. You're a lot better than me at Spanish or German, but sometimes when I see people who are great at foreign languages like this it gives me some inspiration to keep studying
User avatar #99 to #90 - hugora (06/19/2014) [-]
Don't worry, you'll get the hang of it you dedicate yourself. Its just practice.

I moved to Manitoba when I was 14 and lived on my own. Its kinda scary at the beginning when you don't understand a thing and there's no one who speaks the same language as you to help you out. But diving right into the language helped me out a lot.

I'm still a bit self conscious about my English, though. Specially speaking it.
User avatar #123 to #99 - somethingpants (06/19/2014) [-]
During classes for Spanish, I was terrified of attempting an accent because there was a native Spanish-speaker in the class and I didn't want to embarrass myself. But when I speak German with my fellow non-fluent friend, I'm very comfortable with it.
He still kind of makes fun of me when I get things wrong in Spanish since he knows that very well. But he's also very proud of me when I know certain things, so he's a good influence in general.
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