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User avatar #66 - perform (06/19/2014) [-]
On the topic of formalities, you'll often see the Japanese address each other by their last name and then a suffix.

Suffixes:
-san: This is the more commonly used one among two strangers, usually following their last name and on occasion, their first name. This is the equivalent of Mister, Miss or Misses

-kun: This is used more among respected peers and follows their last or first name depending on how familiar they are and preferences. It's not as formal as strangers, but not as familiar as best buddies. Think of the relationship as a mutual friend who you've talked to on several occasions.

-chan: This usually follows the last or first name, once again based on preferences and/or familiarity. This is used when the recipient of the message is supposed to be cuter or wanting attention. For example, you'd use this on somebody's 6 year old sister. This is seldom used on males.

-sama: This is used to address someone very high up only following their last name. This is often used in hierarchies where there is a distinguishable leader who demands a lot of respect and praise from his/her peers.

-lack of prefix: This is reserved only for very personal and familiar friends/people. On occasion, it would be the last name, but very commonly their first name. This would mainly be used by your best friends, familly and/or coworkers.
User avatar #89 to #66 - bitchpleaseshutup ONLINE (06/19/2014) [-]
bizengaust, what suffix do you students use?
#93 to #89 - bizengaust (06/19/2014) [-]
Since my last name, Bizengaust, is a bit hard for my students to say they just call me Sensei. When I first started I allowed them to just call me Anya (they pronounce it anna instead of ahn-yah) sensei but I was given a talking to about that so now they just call me Sensei. In December when I'm married though they will be able to call me Nakamura-Sensei.  I'm kind of looking forward to the looks on their faces when a non Japanese person steps in the class after hearing their teachers name. [spoiler] gif totally not related. Just have a Simpsons problem.
Since my last name, Bizengaust, is a bit hard for my students to say they just call me Sensei. When I first started I allowed them to just call me Anya (they pronounce it anna instead of ahn-yah) sensei but I was given a talking to about that so now they just call me Sensei. In December when I'm married though they will be able to call me Nakamura-Sensei. I'm kind of looking forward to the looks on their faces when a non Japanese person steps in the class after hearing their teachers name. [spoiler] gif totally not related. Just have a Simpsons problem.
User avatar #319 to #93 - perform (06/19/2014) [-]
Oh yeah quick question, how do your students behave? I'm asking relative to how your students treat other teachers as well.
User avatar #327 to #319 - bizengaust (06/19/2014) [-]
My students have been very good for the most part and I seldom get ones that give me headaches. I have this theory that they smell fear so if you come in confident and ready to go they respond with positivity. I have had to tell a few to be respectful of their other teachers because s e they would take advantage of their nervousness.
User avatar #328 to #327 - perform (06/19/2014) [-]
Oh wow white supremacy even in Japan lol
User avatar #313 to #93 - zoidz (06/19/2014) [-]
Why were you given a 'talking to about' for them calling you that, would it be because it's using your first name?
And how does that rule apply to middle names? (I have 4 'names' so would/could the 3 last names/surnames be used normally?) English isn't my 1st language sorry.
#95 to #93 - bitchpleaseshutup ONLINE (06/19/2014) [-]
Thanks for answering my question, here is a random gif as compensation
Thanks for answering my question, here is a random gif as compensation
#77 to #66 - tomthehippie (06/19/2014) [-]
You missed dono, which is similar to sama, although often used between people high up on the chain. For instance, two CEO's would refer to each other as dono, rather than sama, as dono implies an elevated status, but not in regards to the person using it, otherwise it would be polite for the CEOs to refer to each other with san.
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