South korean vs north korean. . 919 points 14 hours age I' m also suspicious that Danish sounds the way it does from children learning to speak from their drunk South korean vs north 919 points 14 hours age I' m also suspicious that Danish sounds the way it does from children learning to speak their drunk
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South korean vs north korean

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919 points 14 hours age
I' m also suspicious that Danish sounds the way it does from children learning to speak
from their drunk parents.
Totally kidding, but Danish sounds ridiculous.
432 points 13 hours age
I once heard the Danish accent described to me as people trying to speak with potatoes
in their mouths.
4- 531 paints 13 hours age
And Portuguese is underwater Spanish.
done hide A.. tact I. ~. p_ arent
I points 12 hours age
And south kerian is just like north kerian but with food in your mouth
...
+880
Views: 30304 Submitted: 07/23/2014
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[ 126 comments ]
> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
User avatar #6 - helion
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
im danish and i dont find the language that hard
jeg syntes faktisk det er et forholdsvis nemt sprog at forstå
det er vitterligt som at lære ABC i skolen
haha scrubs
User avatar #83 to #6 - keyebaus
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
flagen hagen flugen hugen hagen dazs klaralven gugen?
#7 to #6 - cherubium
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
As a Swede I agree.
User avatar #16 to #7 - juicyy
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
også dig din klaphat
#17 to #16 - cherubium
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
hej dansk.
User avatar #59 to #6 - thurah
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
im danish and i can see that danish is extremely hard to learn/understand for someone who's not danish
User avatar #60 to #59 - helion
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
people cant see im joking
User avatar #61 to #60 - thurah
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
step up your sarcasm game, brah
User avatar #62 to #61 - helion
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
its.... advanced sarcasm
User avatar #63 to #62 - thurah
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
this isnt your everyday sarcasm...
User avatar #64 to #63 - helion
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
only for the.... special people
User avatar #65 to #64 - thurah
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
momma says im "speshul"
#73 to #6 - anon id: c9b225b3
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Dansk er røv at lære. Halvdelen af vores grammatik siger bare "DERFOR OG **** DIG"
#77 to #6 - mooghens
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
User avatar #80 to #6 - sixtyfourxgamer
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
det är gay. talar inte svenska med potatis i din mouth
User avatar #99 to #6 - nefarian
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
At lesa danskt er lætt, men tá ið fólk skulu tosa tað, kann tað ljóða sera løgi.
User avatar #30 to #6 - admiralen
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
ive come across an accent in sweden that i cant understand...
i can understand norwegian and danish mostly, but this is just too much.
ive understood one sentense in that accent
Skaaru åwke rullskajder
User avatar #26 to #6 - scizzor
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
The problem isn't the written danish, it's the spoken language. Since we skip nearly half of the letters in the words we speak, making it very difficult for foreigners to understand it. Not to mention the differences in dialects.
User avatar #21 to #6 - darkdanger
Reply +11 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
For meg som er norsk
så er Svensk ok å høre på, men horribelt å lese
Dansk er elendig å høre på, men veldig enkelt å lese
User avatar #49 to #21 - fourthplace
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Lol, sant
User avatar #9 to #6 - haakonbacon
Reply +72 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Å lese dansk er OK, men fy faen for ett jævlig språk å forstå når noen snakker.
User avatar #15 to #9 - juicyy
Reply +6 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
klap fissen pikslips
#103 to #9 - anon id: 0a05b06e
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
ge e d du meha, da e ju engel aa forsteheanhana
#76 to #9 - anon id: 7748a60b
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Det er jo som om de har en kartoffel i halsen!
User avatar #66 to #9 - ilikeducks
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
******* Svenskere
#2 - lordlolland
Reply +55 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Danish, add drunkenness and you have Swedish, add singing to the drunkenness and you have Norwegian.
#58 to #2 - thurah
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
**thurah rolled image** word
#4 to #2 - anon id: 1ed5498b
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Inaccurate though. It's described as speaking with a potato in your mouth because the language doesn't have a single sharp sound, while both Swedish and Norwegian have more of them than English does.
Here's the IPA on the phrase in the three languages:
Danish: Rødgrød med fløde - ˈʁɶð̪ˀˌɡ̊ʁɶð̪ˀ mɛ ˈfløːð̪
Swedish: Röd gröt med grädde - røː grøːt mɛː gr'ed:e
Norwegian: Rødgrøt med fløte - rø:gɾøːt me: 'fløːtə

And Norwegian is said to sound like singing because we use a certain intonation that lets us give anything we say a practiced-sounding and natural flow. We can speak absolute gibberish and make it sound like we're speaking the lyrics to a song.
#8 to #4 - cherubium
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
That is also the reason Threats in norwegian are pretty ******* laughable.
User avatar #19 to #8 - darkdanger
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
I never knew that until someone pointed it out that treats almost always ends on a high pitch.
#20 to #19 - cherubium
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
The funniest one imo is when they threaten to stab you with a knife.
User avatar #22 to #20 - darkdanger
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Yeah, I saw a video about that. Although you really don't think about that if you know the language fluently, it sounds just normal.
#23 to #22 - cherubium
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
aye.
User avatar #108 to #4 - warioteam
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
**** that man
im a simple man i just want to read funny comics and jack off
i dont need this ****
i thought it was summer
#69 - fromthepresent
Reply +8 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Danish language From a norwegian comedy show. Kamelåså, I kek evry tiem.
#70 to #69 - flapz
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Yea had a good laugh over that one aswell and I am Danish
Yea had a good laugh over that one aswell and I am Danish
#84 to #69 - anon id: bc5b1de1
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
'KAmelåså!
User avatar #56 - auryn
Reply +8 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Dutch is just German on drugs.
User avatar #1 - mayorman
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
as a Dane i can confirm the potato
User avatar #79 - iamtheceej
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Welsh is when you have something caught in the back of your throat.
User avatar #91 to #79 - RidingMyPimpmobile
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Just add "Butt" if you're a male or "Bute" if you're a female to the end of a sentence and boom, you're from South Wales.
User avatar #93 to #91 - iamtheceej
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
To be honest half the women down here are butts. I think it's the hairy knuckles.
User avatar #95 to #93 - RidingMyPimpmobile
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Depend show close you live to Swansea tbh
User avatar #97 to #95 - iamtheceej
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
They've twinned it with Mordor now.
User avatar #98 to #97 - RidingMyPimpmobile
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Thought ponty was already twinned with mordor.... maybe it's hobbiton I'm thinking of, both are full of short guys.
#44 - algorath
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
I am an englishman, living in Denmark for the last 10 years or so, and my danish is fluent. However, Danes have a rule similar to "a/an" in english called "en/et". The difference is, there is, to my knowledge, no actual rule to go by.. every dane I have asked just says "Well, you can just hear it's meant to be "et hus" and not "en hus".

As a foreigner, meeting a new word for the first time, I can assure you that this isn't true.
#67 to #44 - habibijan
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
But that's the rule, man! You just know it.

But all kidding aside, I have absolutely no clue, as to why it's one over the other.
User avatar #78 to #44 - honkan
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
I think that goes for all the Scandinavian languages. Norwegian (and maybe Swedish?) also has a thrid variation: "ei". I'm Norwegian but this **** still confuses me, how does a language evolve like that? No rules, just "pick the one that sounds right". .
User avatar #94 to #44 - incrediblejohn
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
i have the opposite problem, i'm dutch and i live in the US and english is hard
User avatar #27 - GIJorge
Reply -13 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Portuguese like underwater spanish? Really? Have you ever heard a spanish man or woman speaking? They sound like freaking baboons with their RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR sounds. Do you want to perfect your spanish? Scratch a blackboard. If your tones match, you're set to go. Portuguese is much more fluid, and a hell of a lot less harsh. If languages were geometrical figures, portuguese would be a ball made of the finest ivory and spanish would be a trapezo-rhombic dodecahedron made of freaking sand paper.
User avatar #75 to #27 - killerliquid
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
I find both equally annoying
#28 to #27 - anon id: 4fa075d5
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
found the portugoose
User avatar #43 to #27 - notnewaccount
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Portuguese is like Spanish biting a pillow.
#48 to #27 - senseii
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
That's true, portuguese is way smoother than spanish. Spanish people always seem angry when talking. It's kinda weird, really.
That's true, portuguese is way smoother than spanish. Spanish people always seem angry when talking. It's kinda weird, really.
User avatar #112 to #48 - notnewaccount
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/25/2014) [-]
(Spain) Then you should pay attention to our faces when we talk. That will solve your doubt. Or just listen to people in different moods, but I've read that is not easy for foreigners to get us angry.
User avatar #110 to #27 - somethingtorn
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/25/2014) [-]
Spanish as heard in Spain and Argentina hurts my ears. It must be that god-forsaken lisp.
User avatar #111 to #110 - notnewaccount
Reply -4 123456789123345869
(07/25/2014) [-]
Spanish->Developed in Spain->Your opinion is ****
#113 to #111 - somethingtorn
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/25/2014) [-]
In comparison to the entire continent that speaks different variations of the same language? That's also including the country I'm from. Feeling more familiar with a regional accent is normal, and given the number of countries that speak Spanish, I feel like its only fair to have a preference on how it is spoken on a day to day basis.   
   
That's like bashing someone who grew up in America for preferring that version of English over the more traditional form spoken in Europe.
In comparison to the entire continent that speaks different variations of the same language? That's also including the country I'm from. Feeling more familiar with a regional accent is normal, and given the number of countries that speak Spanish, I feel like its only fair to have a preference on how it is spoken on a day to day basis.

That's like bashing someone who grew up in America for preferring that version of English over the more traditional form spoken in Europe.
User avatar #114 to #113 - notnewaccount
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(07/25/2014) [-]
Your opinion was offensive, don't try to smooth it now.
User avatar #115 to #114 - somethingtorn
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/25/2014) [-]
If you're that offended by my dislike of a medieval pronunciation method within our native language, then so be it.
User avatar #116 to #115 - notnewaccount
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(07/25/2014) [-]
It's not medieval, it's original. You use more medieval words than us, you are also destroying the language by taking so many words from English, and saying that we have a medieval pronunciation is not facing that you learned it wrong.
User avatar #82 to #27 - priestofkarp
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
I'm Portuguese and it hurt me to read that
User avatar #11 - Loppytaffy
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
And English is just Germanic Latin but bastardised.
#31 to #11 - mutzaki
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
English is completely unrelated to Latin.
User avatar #33 to #31 - thesovereigngrave
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Actually it was influenced quite a bit by the French spoken by the Normans who conquered England in the mid 11th century.
User avatar #35 to #33 - mutzaki
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Not so much that it should be considered a partially Latin language. Almost the whole world was conquered by England for a long time, but most of those countries didn't have their languages influenced too much. History and relations between countries often create a lot of loan words, and that's basically the level of influence French/Latin has had on English. It's still as Germanic as German or Danish, I'd say.
User avatar #36 to #35 - thesovereigngrave
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
I'm not saying that English isn't a Germanic language, but you can't say that England is completely unrelated to Latin. And England conquering a lot of the world and William the Conqueror's conquest of England aren't really comparable. There was more mixing between the Normans and the Anglo-Saxons than between the English and the peoples they ruled over and subjugated.
User avatar #47 to #36 - mutzaki
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
Sure, in the same way that no language is purely in one lineage.
User avatar #117 to #31 - Loppytaffy
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/25/2014) [-]
Romans occupied England before it was England, which is why we have London and the City of London. France and Spain also had a pop at it.
Nouns tend to be of Latin origin, while adjectives are usually Germanic.
User avatar #118 to #117 - mutzaki
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/25/2014) [-]
Examples and/or source plz?
User avatar #119 to #118 - Loppytaffy
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/25/2014) [-]
Medical titles and animal names are Latin. English is very similar to French and Italian (latin languages)- J'adore danse; I adore dance. Nuit/night, velo (bike, from the Latin meaning fast which is used in English words such as velocity).
Germanic adjectives like "liebe" are easy to understand because or their similarities.
User avatar #120 to #119 - mutzaki
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/26/2014) [-]
Medical titles are Latin to be universal. Same with other sciences, such as the special names of animals. Most countries do that.
Night is very similar through many Germanic languages. Nacht, natt, etc. Adore is a good example of a loan word, though. So is fåtölj (arm chair) in Swedish, coming from the French word fauteuil. The word window, I think, comes from old norse "vindöga" (literally wind eye).
I wouldn't say that loan words, common throughout the whole world, is enough to really say that Latin has had any substantial influence on the English language, to the point where you can say it's part Latin. If you're adamant about it, though, then the same applies to Swedish being a partially Latin language. Modern Japanese has lots of English influence, but still remains in a whole different part of the language tree.
User avatar #121 to #120 - Loppytaffy
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/26/2014) [-]
You can't just say it's a borrowed word. All words can be borrowed words, by that logic.

Okay here's one; I was educated in England for 16 years. We learn about the origin of our country, here, not just the last 200 years, pretending that we were never some other empire's bitch.
We learn of Nordic, Roman, Germanic and French occupation of the British isles. We learn about the wars we lost, and what we gained from them (such as the Jorvik settlement, which is what New York si named after).
Britain has been a part of many Latin empires, being within swimming distance of France (you can literally see one country from the closest border of the other), you can't blame the language for taking on French traits; fashion and food did the same.
User avatar #122 to #121 - mutzaki
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/26/2014) [-]
I'd say we probably have close to the same amount of loan words from French and other Latin languages. I just don't see that much Latin in the English language. It's funny, because Sweden doesn't really have much experience of being occupied, but we've still garnered so much influence in culture and language. This has been done through trading and other relationships. The UK is far from the only country with a long history of relationships with other countries, good or bad, but the English language is still a Western Germanic language. French, Italian and Spanish also have plenty of influence from different languages of different origin.

Just tell me this, if you look at the influence from Germanic and Latin, wouldn't you say that the influence from Latin is small in comparison? I would've accepted what you're saying if the English language actually consisted of at least 20% Latin-originating words and phrases. I'd say, very roughly estimating, that it's closer to something like <5%. That's what I'd estimate for the Swedish language, too.

But, hey, neither of us can truly prove our stance. This is just my word against yours and comes down to opinion more than anything.
User avatar #123 to #122 - Loppytaffy
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/26/2014) [-]
The UK actually has between three and six official languages, none of them are English.

I also said Germanic Latin bastardisation, I never said how heavy the influence was. You can't deny that we have far more butchered Latin words than, say, Swedish.
User avatar #124 to #123 - mutzaki
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/26/2014) [-]
According to Wikipedia, you only have English as your official language, but also Scots, Ulster-Scots, Welsh, Cornish, Irish, Scottish Gaelic as recognized regional languages. Then again, Wikipedia.

Fair enough.
User avatar #125 to #124 - Loppytaffy
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/26/2014) [-]
Wikipedia is wrong. English was never registered as a language in England because it was a given, there was no declaratino of new language like there was with colonies. We have, in the UK, Irish gaelic, Scottish gaelic, Welsh gaelic, Cornish and possibly two other languages.
User avatar #126 to #125 - mutzaki
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(07/26/2014) [-]
Huh, that's pretty interesting, actually.
User avatar #85 - chrisel
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(07/24/2014) [-]
German is just Dutch spoken by an really angry person.