Numbers Mason 2. Source: Imgur. Ilt' s of. MFW I read the comments. Numbers Mason 2 Source: Imgur Ilt' s of MFW I read the comments
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> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
#17 - iRoflcopterU
+46 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
stickied by mudkipfucker
MFW I read the comments.
MFW I read the comments.
#13 - AnonymousDonor
Reply +13 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
and then there's group theory   
   
MFW i finally understand this language
and then there's group theory

MFW i finally understand this language
#14 to #13 - AnonymousDonor
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
oh **** i added the picture and the reaction overwrote it
i has the dumb
User avatar #46 - anonymoose
Reply +6 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
Gonna try and explain this for y'all.

Guide for what the terms mean:
ln(x) - "ln" is a logarithm of base e.
logarithm (from the definition of ln(x) ) - logarithm is a function, basically we have multiplication and division and we also have logarithms and powers. Lets say Log(x) is logarithm to the base 10 of a value x. 10^(log(x)) is equal to x. log (1000) is 3 because 10^3 is 1000.
e (from the definition of ln(x) ) - e is an important number in maths, like pi. It has infinite decimal places, like pi. It is roughly 2.718
dx - Differentiation is another function. When you differentiate x^2 you take the number in the power (2 here) and multiply by that, then you take 1 away from the power, then add "dx" to the end. If you differentiate u^2 it's 2u du. So differentiating x^2 = 2x dx. In basic terms, dx is just something you add to the end of the equation after differentiating.
Integration - Integration is the opposite of differentiation. Integrating a number, we add 1 to the power (the power of the number beside the d) and then divide by the number in the power. E.g. integrating x^2, we get (x^3)/3 and then we remove the dx or d(whatever letter we're integrating with respect to)

Now:

u = ln(x)
On the left, we're differentiating u, so we multiply by the power (which is just 1, here) then take away 1 from the power, leaving us with u^0. Any number to the power of 0 is just 1. We're left with 1 * du, or just du.

On the right, we have ln(x). Some values, when differentiated have different rules than just taking one from the power. For a logarithm, the differentiation is 1/x giving us 1/x dx

So, differentiating u = ln(x) we get du = 1/x dx

The bottom equation, we're integrating.

dv is really 1*dv, so integrating 1 (with respect to v because of the dv) we just get v and remove the dv.
x^5 dx, we add 1 to the x and divide by the number in the power, to get (x^6)/6
User avatar #27 - johncaveson **User deleted account**
Reply +6 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
Mathematics student Degree Race reporting in.

Not Master race, Degree race...get it? GET IT?
User avatar #61 to #27 - Pena
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
Physics Master degree student race reporting in.
User avatar #62 to #61 - johncaveson **User deleted account**
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
Technically I'm doing a 4 year Master course, but that ruins the joke...

Nice to see you.
User avatar #28 to #27 - metaol
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
Unfortunately I do.
#31 - agentmoleman
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
Math thread..
#58 to #31 - fenrirwolfe
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
Maths thread..
#32 to #31 - agentmoleman
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(11/06/2013) [-]
#33 to #32 - agentmoleman
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(11/06/2013) [-]
#34 to #33 - agentmoleman
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
#35 to #34 - agentmoleman
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
#36 to #35 - agentmoleman
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
#37 to #36 - agentmoleman
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(11/06/2013) [-]
#38 to #37 - agentmoleman
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
And my last one..
User avatar #1 - stafforadam
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(11/05/2013) [-]
shouldn't it be x^6/6 + c?
User avatar #2 to #1 - mooproxy
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/05/2013) [-]
Almost certainly, though it's out of context so it may be about definite integrals.
#5 to #1 - anon id: f3d6116e
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
You don't need to add a constant back in unless you're given an initial value you are trying to solve for.
#7 to #1 - anon id: 60b2f3b9
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
It's true even without the constant c.
#23 to #1 - anon id: 21fe9f4b
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
You are right.
User avatar #41 to #1 - apocalypticburrito
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(11/06/2013) [-]
its true and needed as most people will be up tight and mark down for no c
User avatar #50 to #1 - anonymoose
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
Yes, but In this case, it looks like it's just some side work for an equation where integration by parts is needed. If that's the case, adding the constant in there is unnecessary because there will be a further integration. Since the constant is arbitrary, you can keep it until you've integrated fully.
#48 - anon id: 88ea57fd
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
This is really stupid, dx is a notation for differential calculus, it is by no means a variable that can be replaced with a value.
User avatar #55 to #48 - ancano
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
a variable, no. able to be replaced by a value, yes
#72 to #48 - ennemi
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(11/06/2013) [-]
when did they gave a value to dx ?
User avatar #52 to #48 - anonymoose
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
But dx is technically 1*dx. Integrating 1*dx is x (+c).
#44 - Her
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
Everyone else here is speaking math.   
But then there's me, speaking elvish and ****.
Everyone else here is speaking math.
But then there's me, speaking elvish and ****.
User avatar #73 - strelokkk
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(11/06/2013) [-]
Isn't the result of the 2nd equation v = x^6 instead of v = (x^6)/6 ?
I may be wrong, I'm not that good at maths, but I find x^6 when I calculate !
User avatar #74 to #73 - anonymoose
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
For integration, you add one to the power and divide by whatever the power is. So x^5, you add 1 and it becomes x^6 and then you divide by 6 to give you (x^6)/6
User avatar #75 to #74 - strelokkk
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
Oh okay, I didn't realize they were integrations, and not a basic equation.

I feel so dumb... Thanks for enlightening me !
User avatar #42 - nigeltheoutlaw
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(11/06/2013) [-]
Aw, I miss that level of integration. We just finished triple integrals in Calculus 3.
User avatar #51 to #42 - tubaplayah
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(11/06/2013) [-]
Do you go to UF? my girlfriend just finished as well
User avatar #53 to #51 - nigeltheoutlaw
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(11/06/2013) [-]
No, I go to Northern Arizona University. What's UF stand for?
User avatar #54 to #53 - tubaplayah
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(11/06/2013) [-]
University of Florida
User avatar #56 to #54 - nigeltheoutlaw
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(11/06/2013) [-]
It's only on the other side of the country, that's pretty close.