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Gay 4. Source: imgur subscribe for more New York is a state in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. New York is the 27th-most extensi

Source: imgur
subscribe for more

New York is a state in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. New York is the 27th-most extensive, the third-most populous, and the seventh-most densely populated of the 50 United States. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south and by Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont to the east. The state has a maritime border with Rhode Island east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Ontario to the west and north, and Quebec to the north. The state of New York is often referred to as New York State, so as to distinguish it from New York City.

New York City, with a Census-estimated population of over 8.3 million in 2012,[8][9] is the most populous city in the United States.[10][11] Alone, it makes up over 40 percent of the population of New York State. It is known for its status as a center for finance and culture and for its status as the largest gateway for immigration to the United States. New York City attracts considerably more foreign visitors than any other US city.[12] Both the state and city were named for the 17th century Duke of York, future King James II of England.

tth
Humans of 'tew York
1 know this isn' t going to be a popular opinion, but I' m gay, and T
don' t think there' s nearly as much discrimination as people claim.
Don' t get me wrong, I' experienced discrimination. But it hasn' t
been a huge factor in my life. Heel like a lot of people bring
discrimination on themselves by getting in people' s faces too
much. They like to saw 'Accept me or else!' They go around
demanding respect as a member of a group, instead offereing
respect as an individual. And that sort of behavior invites
discrimination. Ne never demanded respect because horas gay,
and I haven' t experienced much discrimination when people find
out that I am."
...
+1234
Views: 51998 Submitted: 02/19/2014
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[ 240 comments ]
> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
#213 - wolviewolverine
0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
stickied by mudkipfucker
#5 - dephira
Reply +135 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
It's nice for that guy that he was able to live his life without much discrimination, but as long as there are gay teenagers kicked out by their parents and being killed in some countries for being gay. And even in the US, yes, I might not be beaten up for being gay, but if I hold hands with my boyfriend I will get weird stares (in liberal states) or verbal abuse levied against me (in less liberal states). So it seems a bit short-sighted of this guy to generalize his experience onto an entire population of people, a lot of whom have had it a lot harder than him.

No one who's gay demands to be respected as member of a group; from the get-go, they are less respected for being part of that very group and then, if they manage to stand out as an individual, they might be regarded with respect: "oh, for a gay person, you're actually really cool". **** that. As a straight person, you start out neutral, and if you do something bad, you'll lose respect. As a gay person, you start out facing prejudice and if you do well, you'll advance to the neutral ground. Let's not even get into the fact how wrong the statement "they go around demanding respect as a member of a group is" when in fact everything you do as a gay person will reflect back on the whole group, because that's how the rest of society sees us. As long as we don't have the luxury of being judged as individuals, gay discrimination clearly exists.
#159 to #5 - broorb
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
This was so beautifully written I had to put my tea down to read properly
#139 to #5 - bann
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
I also have to say, having lived in various pockets of the US, NYC is about as gay friendly as it gets.
User avatar #201 to #5 - achimp
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Discrimination is someone looking at you the wrong way? Who determines what a "wrong look" is? Doesn't that seems completely arbitrary?
#214 to #201 - broorb
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
oh you know what he means don't be persnickety
User avatar #223 to #214 - achimp
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]


EVERYONE experiences adversity - if it isn't about one thing it's about another.

What do you want society to do about it? Commanding "society" to change isn't going to work, so what?

Not only that, but dephira consistently said that "we [gays] don't have the luxury of individuality" and fails to realize the irony in that - you want to be an individual, don't claim to speak for an entire group of people.
#206 to #201 - anon id: 28e8116b
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Yes of course. The less arbitrary the worse it is, but it's still discrimination.
#13 to #5 - nottsfc
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
That was very insightful thanks for taking the time to write i am gay myself but i dont know how to tell my parents.
User avatar #25 to #5 - mrfumbles
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
people usually reject things that they arent used to. one of my friends and teammates in XC came out his senior year of highschool. i still think of him as the same weird person i first met.
User avatar #170 to #5 - jukuku
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Yeah this REALLY ******* pissed me off. He's practically saying "I didn't deal with it, so it's not a huge deal for anyone else!"

I JUST read someone's story about how their boyfriend was sent into gay conversion therapy (read a s torture) because they were in a relationship.
#174 to #5 - larknok
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
I agree with pretty much everything you said except...

"Let's not even get into the fact how wrong the statement "they go around demanding respect as a member of a group is" when in fact everything you do as a gay person will reflect back on the whole group, because that's how the rest of society sees us."

This is grade A ********. It's basically saying that until the entirety of society agrees that it is just as taboo to be anti-gay as racist, every gay individual is subjugated to the tyranny of the masses: "you can't just be an idle gay person who pursues their own interests, no, you have to speak up and fight, and become an activist, even if you don't want to!"

In the words of Neil deGrasse Tyson interpreting a college friend: "Astrophysics? The Black Community cannot afford the luxury of someone with your intellect to spend it on that subject." ... Tyson, of course, responds to this and rejects it.

Source: www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPf03T8YN-4
#218 to #174 - dephira
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
I feel like you misunderstood what I said, or maybe I'm misunderstanding you. All I meant by the statement was that, as a gay person, or any type of minority, people will allow your actions to reflect back on their opinion of your entire group. Non-minorities get to be judged as individuals based on their actions. Minorities are often (consciously or subconsciously) lumped together in people's heads as one mass of people; what I do as a gay person (if they're aware that I'm gay) will contribute to their perception of all gay people. I'm not saying everyone should be an activist, just that everyone in a minority is basically constantly forced to represent millions of other people who might be completely different from him.
#219 to #218 - larknok
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Or you could just insist that it doesn't make any bit of difference, which may very well be the case.

If you take Neil deGrasse Tyson and observe the man, the most stark feature is his intellect and ability to communicate it. Not his race. If you take Alan Turing, the most stark feature is his genius. Not his homosexuality.

Of course, both are perfect counterexamples to their stereotypes, but consider this:

If a gay man rapes somebody else, the correct response is: rape is a ****** thing to do, he should be punished/reformed for his crime. The incorrect response is: wow, way to make the gay community look bad. You reflect on the entire gay community.

And if what you're saying is true (and to some extent I do think you're right) that: "as a gay person, or any type of minority, people will allow your actions to reflect back on their opinion of your entire group." then it follows that it is entirely better to be in the majority, because at least then you are given the freedom to be an individual.

Now what I don't get is whether or not you are using that quote above to complain how badly the gay community has it, or to necessitate that gay people don't have the luxury not to make their image better.
User avatar #152 to #5 - xxbandwagonxx
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
But you're generalizing your experience on an entire population as well.
I'm not saying you're wrong, since you experienced it yourself your right.
But the man above does have a valid point as well.
#163 to #152 - dephira
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
You're right to an extent, but the point is that it is much more problematic to generalize that no one else is having problems either, because it could lead to a stop of our efforts to become equal. We know for a fact that there's many people out there who are still being discriminated against for being gay, and trying to fight against that doesn't hurt or even affect those who were lucky enough not to experience that discrimination.
User avatar #111 to #5 - guymandude
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
That is the reason why I hate how people say that being a minority in the US doesn't matter anymore, and if a person of a minority compains, it is seen as ridiculous. (Though I will admit, the US has come very far in terms of race and being a minority would lead to MUCH less of a struggle in life than being gay. As a country, we've come far enough to where I'd say that minorities in at least 60-70% of places in the US "start at neutral", as you would put it.
User avatar #2 - shaftyface
Reply +78 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
Gay & Feminist activist groups need more people with this guys mentality.
#33 to #2 - anon id: 0aa67f14
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
read comment # 5 to find out why this guy's anecdotal evidence doesn't work for making statements about a whole group of people.
User avatar #215 to #2 - grapesforall
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Pssssh if you think you have it hard, try being a black gay midget
User avatar #11 to #2 - littleliz
Reply +8 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
dont forget some vegans and their im better than everyone else attitude and the you should worship me cause im some gods savior for not eating meat, ********. i think everyone in a "group" needs to be like this guy. no matter what in any case in any situation if you turn the negativity onto the people you're trying to be accepted by you will just be hated more.
#126 to #11 - anon id: 122b6692
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Maybe it's just me, but all the Vegans I met never came off as acting better than everyone else, except one that everyone hated. As a bacon lover, I often encourage the vegans I meet to at least eat a little bacon. I explain how it's important for the development of a healthy brain, etc.
User avatar #190 to #126 - littleliz
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
well their diet is the best for us. weve been taught that we need meat and its further from the truth. vegan is the best diet (from a health standpoint not moral) so telling them its good for their brain isnt correct. but meats still the best **** ever lol
User avatar #34 - JwBread
Reply +65 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
I'm gay and I hate it when other gay people do the 'omg I'm gay don't discriminate' routine. A friend of mine is also gay, but the more flamboyant, feminine type. We went out to a club with friends a few times and all night he'd be grinding against straight guys, hugging and kissing girls in front of their boyfriends (it would only be a peck on the cheek, but still) and then just acting like a general huge faggot. Once people knew he was gay, which wasn't hard to be honest, he'd add a hostile comment amongst the lines of 'and I'm proud so if you don't like it, tough'

Towards the end of almost every night, he'd start crying about how hard it is to be gay, how people discriminate against him and all the usual ********. I've personally never had anyone be mean to me to my face because of being gay, because I don't shove it in people's faces.

Long story short, If you don't want to be treated different, don't act like you're an exception and that the world owes you something.
User avatar #168 to #34 - jukuku
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Yeah that's being a ******* asshole and sexually assaulting people, which has nothing to do with being gay.
#1 - agreatusername
Reply -22 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
Well, he's not wrong. I don't like being treated like **** for the actions of the rest of the group that Im in.
#3 to #1 - gustavodourado
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
****** bronies

celestia is my waifu
#4 to #3 - nimithecat
Reply -10 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
Noooo!!! Why would Celestia cheat on me? Have I not been having enough horse sex?
God, my fedora can't take this anymore.
Me and celestia are going to have a talk.
User avatar #6 to #4 - vpngtn
Reply +28 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
please, even if this is a joke, lets keep it in ponytime.
User avatar #8 to #6 - nimithecat
Reply -6 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
dont worry, it's a joke. Nobody would be stupid enough to **** a horse.
User avatar #9 to #8 - vpngtn
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
nobody on FJ at least
User avatar #10 to #8 - littleliz
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
there was a man a few years ago who snuck onto a horse ranch and started ******* a horse yelling rainbow dash. so some people are that stupid. but thats with any fetish
User avatar #118 to #10 - gotthembarrels
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Actually that was fake.
#15 to #10 - anon id: 313a9b5f
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
It was on the internet it must be true
User avatar #16 to #15 - littleliz
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
it was on the news. then i saw it on the internet
#18 to #16 - anon id: 313a9b5f
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
it was faked. Just bcuz it was on the news doesn't mean its legit. News companies can tell ******** stories
User avatar #19 to #18 - littleliz
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
and how do you know if it was fake?
#20 to #19 - anon id: 313a9b5f
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
No reputable news agency on the planet is allowed to have headline pictures like that. They'd have a picture of the farm where it happened or something.
Also the writing is inefficient. A real editor would never allow something with so simple a story to be written in that many words.
Assume any picture of a news article is fake unless a link is provided that leads to a real news website.
User avatar #21 to #20 - littleliz
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
i dont know what article you're speaking of but i didnt see any with a guy ******* a horse picture. i saw one with the owner with the horses face being upset
User avatar #23 to #21 - littleliz
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
and the article was like a paragraph long
#7 to #4 - gustavodourado
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
SHE IS MINE NOW PUNK!

i fed her,i tip my fedora harder than anyone,i butsecs her,oils her,she loves me,im her senpai now,sorry kiddo....
User avatar #12 to #7 - brrigg
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
yall *********** is weird.
#26 - nerdrugger
Reply +23 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
this guy was fortunate to not face that much prejudice, but not all are as lucky as him to live in a place where being gay wasn't a big deal. If this guy lived in the south, Russia, India, the Middle East, much of Africa, he would probably be singing a different tune

people should be judged and treated by who they are as an individual person

but when a group of people are being unfairly discriminated against, that is when they have to stand up for their rights.
User avatar #28 to #26 - philliyoMLB
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
Well, everything is ****** in those places, what the **** are we gonna do about it?
#29 to #26 - anon id: 65d51ac0
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Have you noticed that the majority of the gay people who are discriminated against in places that aren't ********* like the ones you mentioned are the ones who act flamboyantly so? You can be gay without being an obnoxious asshole.
User avatar #30 to #29 - nerdrugger
Reply +10 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
so because someone is flamboyant that makes it ok to discriminate against them?

User avatar #45 to #30 - nuclearkitteh
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
No, but it does mean you can hate them for being an obnoxious asshole, which they will almost invariably misinterpret as discriminating based on sexuality.
User avatar #50 to #45 - nerdrugger
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
well not liking them is one thing.
>denying them employment cause of that,
>trying to pass laws that would make it legal to deny them goods and services,
>not allowing them to see their significant other in the hospital,
>physically attacking/beating them up
>etc, etc,
is a whole another thing

And hate is a strong thing that you shouldnt rush to do

As in the words of Jedi Master Yoda
"Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering"

So is all that grief really worth it cause someone acts annoyingly?
#79 to #50 - wimwam
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Just going to chime in- if someone acts annoyingly (regardless of all other factors), would you not deny them employment for that? assuming you are a hiring manager
User avatar #80 to #79 - nerdrugger
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
well yes

but what about the people that are annoy by, blacks, women

should we accommodate by and not hire anyone that could possibly annoy someone

and Dale was cooler in the books than the show
User avatar #83 to #80 - wimwam
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
I think we were discussing behaviors, not appearances. Anyway, carry on citizen.
User avatar #86 to #83 - nerdrugger
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
aw now i cant talk walking dead with someone
User avatar #88 to #86 - wimwam
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Sorry m8. I actually don't even watch the show; I've only seen very small bits and pieces.
User avatar #89 to #88 - nerdrugger
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
ok that fine , hope you have a good day
User avatar #90 to #89 - wimwam
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
You too
User avatar #51 to #50 - nuclearkitteh
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Well here's a thought. Maybe if they weren't flamboyant, and acted like a normal gay person, their employer/ attacker/ whatever else wouldn't even realize they're gay. Some off my friends who are gay get asked out by chicks because said chicks don't even realize they're gay.
#54 to #51 - nerdrugger
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
well i hate to break it to you....

but there are a lot of different people out there, and what is normal for each of them can be quite different

like being from Chicago I was raised to view anyone that put ketchup on a hot dog was committing a sin. However for some people, ketchup is there favorite thing and they love slathering it on those hot dogs. So i realize that, that isnt that big of a deal.

So that why i believe should adapt the "dont give a ****" philosophy

It real simple if someone is different than you, and it doesn't hurt anyone, dont give a ****.

For example if you see a vegan out on the street and you love the taste of meat in your mouth, dont pin them down and try to force feed em meat. Just dont give a ****

So if you dont like gays, then dont, but dont discriminate against em for being that way. Just dont give a **** and go on with your life

User avatar #57 to #54 - nuclearkitteh
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Okay. I think I've been misunderstood. Let me try again. Also, I'm gonna use your vegan metaphor. You claim to adopt the "don't give a ****" philosophy. I couldn't agree more. However, you state that you shouldn't try to force feed a vegan meat because they don't like it. But wouldn't it be the same for a gay man to flaunt in front of someone why doesn't like gays due to religion and what not? Maybe it isn't exactly the same, but you can't deny that it isn't eerily similar.
User avatar #62 to #57 - nerdrugger
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
well the people who say it cause of religion are kinda using it as an excuse to hate

cause if you look at a lot of the bible, there are a lot of **** up things you should be ok with and plenty of normal things that they say you shouldnt be ok with
User avatar #68 to #62 - nuclearkitteh
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
I never claimed it was okay to hate due to religion. But shouldn't your "don't give a ****" philosophy work both ways, or only for people you like?
User avatar #71 to #68 - nerdrugger
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
ah that brings me to the second tennant of that philopshy

the be an adult and deal with it


yes gays should calm some things down a bit. but a few parades and high voices is not really that much of a burden on someone else
User avatar #73 to #71 - nuclearkitteh
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Well then following your second tennant, gays can be adults and deal with people hating them due to religion. And the parades and high voices hurt the gays themselves, either through a) bringing a bad name to gays as a whole or b) giving the USI (Unwarranted Self Importance) Syndrome. They're gonna think gays are special if they get their own parade. I'm straight, where's my parade?
User avatar #78 to #73 - nerdrugger
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
when its not a big deal

im pretty sure discrimination is a bit of a big deal

also
st paddy days parade
octoberfest
and quite a few other festivals and holidays
User avatar #81 to #78 - nuclearkitteh
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
So you're telling me all of those are hosted specifically to celebrate heterosexuality.
User avatar #82 to #81 - nerdrugger
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
pride parades arent specifically for homosexuality

bi sexuals, tran sexuals, a sexuals, hetero sexuals are all welcome and celebrated
User avatar #142 to #82 - jamiemsm
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
i once got told by a gay guy that i was the most disgusting thing he had ever seen. it was because of my unwashed beard and my 3 days old t-shirt with staints on it sorry it was ketchup from my hotdog :/ . wouldn't say its fair he can go and talk about being discriminated and then do that to me :/
User avatar #233 to #142 - nerdrugger
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/21/2014) [-]
that sounds like you dont take care of your appearance too much

and there is a bit difference between him being rude to you and actual discrimination
User avatar #235 to #233 - jamiemsm
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/21/2014) [-]
well i hadn't washed my clothes yet so didn't have some fresh. (it was weekend so allmost never do that until sunday) and i was at a mutual friends house.
its not like i smelled like a mink farm after i rolled in pig ****, my t-shirt didn't stink either but it had those old stains and i was unshaved with a not very handsome beard. it was my apperance and not my smell he said it for.
and again i have nothing agains homosexuals but i hate flamboyant gay people, i also hate girls who behave that way.
anyway my point is, if im not allowed to say its disgusting to wear tight clothes that only covers to right under his breast muscles then he is not allowed to say that about my stain shirt : )

sorry for this reply. i litteraly just woke up and not sure if it makes sense
User avatar #237 to #235 - nerdrugger
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/21/2014) [-]
ok bout that night

would you try to go on a date with a girl and dont think she would of say anything similar

and most guys that where shirts like that tend to be straight guys either at a gym or a college fraternity house
User avatar #240 to #237 - jamiemsm
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/22/2014) [-]
thats why im not saying its gay people in a whole but like a guy said before.
the flamboyant ones : )
#238 to #237 - jamiemsm
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/22/2014) [-]
no ofcouse not, when i go on dates, or to school or something similar i wash my self and take clean clothes on.

this was the kind of shirt i was talking about
User avatar #239 to #238 - nerdrugger
0 123456789123345869
(02/22/2014) [-]
well the way you described yourself their sounds pretty unappealling

and very few gays where shirts like that
#208 to #142 - anon id: 28e8116b
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Are you ******* serious right now?
User avatar #92 to #30 - usernameluisdjlols
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
well sometimes people can be assholes with their flamboyancy, and if i was a job owner, i wouldnt want some asshole to work at my job. surely it wouldnt be because he's gay, but because of how he acts because he assumes the identity of being so
User avatar #63 to #30 - skubasteve
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
No it just means they are an obnoxious asshole who deserved my discrimination regardless of sexual orientation. They are ******* annoying.
User avatar #64 to #63 - nerdrugger
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
well then you have a lot of the world to discriminate against

it is real easy to find something obnoxiously annoying about anyone
User avatar #53 to #30 - mcroflskates
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
No, but if they want the same respect as a straight person, why go to those lengths to point out that they're clearly not straight?
User avatar #55 to #53 - nerdrugger
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
because in history gays have been pushed by society back by society. Trying to paint the image that gay people dont exist, or that they are sick derange people to be avoided like the plague.

so they go through all those lengths to say, yes we do exist, that we arent all that different from you , and that we arent going to take being pushed around anymore
User avatar #59 to #55 - mcroflskates
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Women got their rights without flailing their panties around, why can't gays get their rights while acting like normal people? Probably because most of them do it for the attention, or because it's the "big thing" right now. I know more than a few respectable gays who I didn't know were gay until I saw them with their significant other. You can get very far without drawing attention to the fact that you **** the same sex. It's pathetic that people feel they have to dress like that just to draw attention to something that should be kept private. Respect is indeed earned, and any respectable person will give you that respect regardless of your sexuality, but I can gayruntee you they won't give you that respect when you walk around in rainbow short shorts.
User avatar #61 to #59 - nerdrugger
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
double standards a bit there plenty of straight people are pretty flamboyant

flamboyance is more than just a pair of short shorts
User avatar #65 to #61 - mcroflskates
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
There's zero double standards, I'd give the same look to a straight dude wearing short shorts. And he'd probably get the same respect as they gay guy wearing them if he tried to get a job. In the end, you have to do what you want to do, but accept that every action has consequences. If you can make a living wearing those short shorts, go for it. If you can't, don't complain to the internet and tell everyone you didn't get anywhere because you're gay. People need to stop using being gay as an excuse for everything.
User avatar #66 to #65 - nerdrugger
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
you kinda missed what i meant

you ever see a cow boy with a giant ass hat, that pretty flamboyant
ever see a football fan go shirtless and spray paint their chest in the middle of winter? that pretty flamboyant

see any cosplayer at a con...
i could go on
User avatar #205 to #29 - emokoneko
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(02/20/2014) [-]
Yes, only flamboyant homosexuals are denied equal rights and bullied. How would you feel if you couldn't talk to anyone about that person you like, or admit your feelings to them, and especially you couldn't actually date them or take them out where anyone could see--and all hell breaks loose if you even mention marrying them.

It's not just flamboyant gays. That's just an excuse people use to make themselves feel better about being assholes. Some girls act the same way, or worse, without getting treated the same.
#76 to #26 - bobbysnobby
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User avatar #153 to #26 - xxbandwagonxx
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Depends on where in the south, my current location has a city practically named by the gays for the gays about 20 minutes away.
#164 - jackjr
Reply +19 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
I've never had any issues with discrimination for being gay...    
   
That might be because I'm straight though.
I've never had any issues with discrimination for being gay...

That might be because I'm straight though.
User avatar #179 to #164 - feedtehtrollz
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
I'm gay, I'm not one of those flamboyant ones or try to bring it up every waking minute. Most discrimination I've had wasn't up front, more like people mumbling faggot behind my back.
User avatar #185 to #179 - thelastamerican
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
I'm straight, and that happens to me also. I would just get used to the fact that people are asshats if I were you.
#194 to #179 - anon id: ddcdd995
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
is he gone?

faggot
#198 to #194 - tropicvnt
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
that was uncalled for...
#49 - slenderwolf
Reply +11 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
I live in Texas, so I've heard more than my fare share of horror stories about coming out. This man was lucky he wasn't discriminated against, but there is no clear equation on how you will be treated no matter what group you are a part of.
User avatar #97 to #49 - coconuthat
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(02/20/2014) [-]
But the good thing is though its starting to become more excepted, They're even going to acknowledge gay married couples. They still can't get legally married here but if they go elsewhere to get married they consider them married now.

Texas is awesome
#128 - wanicochil
Reply +8 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
If I came out if I was bi in my area I would be ridiculed and outcasted, if I said I had a crush on a guy, almost every guy would avoid me and I would be left a very lonely person   
   
It depends on where you live, not one person can speak for everyone, he is making baseless points based on his lifestyle, not researched through many different peoples lives and locations, everything isn't black and white, there are about 1000000 different shades of grey   
   
Example - We asked one of my guy friends who is a huge homophobic that if his best friend of 15 or so years came out gay, they would still be friends, and he said no, he would hate his bestfriend with a passion   
   
Now imagine that in a catholic school, but everyone has that state of thought   
   
And I most likely would of been kicked out by my parents, but that's a different story
If I came out if I was bi in my area I would be ridiculed and outcasted, if I said I had a crush on a guy, almost every guy would avoid me and I would be left a very lonely person

It depends on where you live, not one person can speak for everyone, he is making baseless points based on his lifestyle, not researched through many different peoples lives and locations, everything isn't black and white, there are about 1000000 different shades of grey

Example - We asked one of my guy friends who is a huge homophobic that if his best friend of 15 or so years came out gay, they would still be friends, and he said no, he would hate his bestfriend with a passion

Now imagine that in a catholic school, but everyone has that state of thought

And I most likely would of been kicked out by my parents, but that's a different story
#133 to #128 - Smithly
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Love how smooth that gif is.
Love how smooth that gif is.
User avatar #131 to #128 - catburglarpenis
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
So let's be bi together. We can tie our dicks together and go skydiving, or something.
#145 to #131 - gyptice
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
"or something"
User avatar #136 to #128 - muertealosafricano
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
Why do you have to announce to the world that you take cock in the ass anyways?
User avatar #144 to #136 - renegadesparks **User deleted account**
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
because coming out doesn't always mean announcing it, if you happen to hook up with a guy, and people see, then it just came out, not everyone who "comes out" actually is going "HEY LOOK AT ME I'M NOT STRAIGHT" a lot of them are just, you know, living their lives
User avatar #147 to #136 - wanicochil
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(02/20/2014) [-]
So I'm meant to keep my emotions bottled up, never admitted I like a person, never being able to as the other guy said, hook up with another guy, and just keep living my life as a lie?

ok buddy
User avatar #17 - lurg
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------
personally my coming out experience was meet with a fair amount of support from both parents and friends which was incredibly refreshing and unexpected. honestly this guys mentality is pretty awesome but id like to add the point that telling any and every one is both pointless and wrong. its no ones business but my own, if people are interested then they ******* ask and i tell but i find no need to tell for the sake of telling. I find it particularly annoying when friends take it upon them selves to tell people, sometimes out of spite and sometimes because they are assholes and yet other times they do it because they don't think it matters.
-------------------------------------------------END RANT----------------------------------------------------
#22 to #17 - phoenixactual
Reply +8 123456789123345869
(02/19/2014) [-]
Gay is one thing, it almost seems that, by telling random people, you're expecting special treatment. You want to try challenging, try being trans and coming out. People in your life are going to have to know eventually anyways, and you WILL lose friends
#47 to #22 - igneous
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
special snowflake olympics
special snowflake olympics
User avatar #110 to #22 - guymandude
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(02/20/2014) [-]
Yeah, that seems pretty rough. I mean when I think about it, I can't help but feel like I wouldn't be as accepting as I would hope. I mean, if my best friend told me he wanted to become a woman, its not like I would have any dislike for him at that point, but in all honesty, even though I like to think I'm super accepting and open-minded...I don't know if I could really ever feel comfortable spending a lot of time around him ever again. I'm not happy about that, but its something I realized about myself. and you're definitely right about coming out as gay being easier - if my best friend told me he was gay, I wouldn't give two *****.
User avatar #101 to #22 - deityzx
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(02/20/2014) [-]
I actually came out publicly as Trans about half a year ago, and only one person in my life said anything against it. My dad told me he lost a lot of sleep thinking about it for a while after I told him and he has tried to convince me not to go through with it. but he's an old fogey and he "understands that he doesn't understand." To be honest coming out was almost completely positive for me. I've noticed I've been happier without the burden on my shoulders. I still feel a bit weird when I act feminine around my family though but that's just cause I know they're not used to it and I hate to make it awkward for them. Heck, even my girlfriend is saying she still wants to stay with me during and after my transition, she's really helped me with buying clothes, makeup and all that.
I know my case may be special, or at least, everyone's is different for sure, or maybe it's because I'm Canadian and people are nice here .

My only problem with coming out as trans is that I've been waiting about 7 months now to get an appointment with a specialist to talk about it, meaning I haven't been able to start hormones yet which really gets me down. But meh I try to keep thinking positively about the future and what I hope it will be like when I don't get weird looks from strangers for telling them the name I probably will be using in a year or two's time instead of my birth name.

anywho I've typed long enough. To anyone out there struggling with coming out, it's perfectly reasonable to be afraid, I was terrified tbh. No one can tell you when the right time to come out as trans/gay/etc is. It's but to you. And good luck.

#217 to #101 - phoenixactual
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(02/20/2014) [-]
Not everybody has bad experiences, some of us do tend to get lucky. I met a trans man once who's entire family became trans rights activists after he told them. Talk about support, this guy's mother was part of the state government, she could get stuff done
User avatar #24 to #22 - lurg
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(02/19/2014) [-]
im both sorry and glad to hear that. im sorry that you have encountered bigotry in your life due to your sexual identity. However, i am glad that you are proud and outgoing enough to identify your sexual identity and telling people. i think telling people can be relieving and its necessary for parents/friends to know for various different reasons. and i mean i understand its hurtful that friends leave, but if they find YOUR sexual identity so disturbing that they can no longer be friends with you then they dont matter and it must be a lost cause. YOUR sexual identity is your business and yours to decide (choose is the wrong word i believe and decide dosnt fit but for all intensive purposes just go with it <3) no relationship should be effected.

have a nice day~
#178 - jakols
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
as a straight man i really have no saying in this but, i think this guy got a point...
i don't feel like the discrimination is happening because of the sexual orientation itself,
but rather because the person him/herself and the persons behavior.
A rather "stereotypical" overthetop gay man isn't frowned upon for being attracted to
other men, as much as he is frowned upon for being "all up in yo face with that ****".
For some reason the word Gay and "Camp" (Feminine) have been mixed up.
A gay man is nothing else but a man who likes other men.
There is absolutely no relation between being attracted to men and having fabulous fashion sense...
I really do fail to see the connection between ******* men in the ass and complete control over color-coordination for decorating living rooms.
So in my opinion its the "Campness" people get all worked up over.
All the "IM GAY"! *makeup and tight clothes* "LOOOOOK AAAAT MEEEE"!*bent hand* that's whats bothering the **** out of people... There is absolutely no valid reason for the "overthetop" gay men to suddenly start talking "gay". you all know what i mean... that incredibly aggravating tone of voice and the ******* lisp "Liek Ohmahgaaawd thats shsick"
im not saying that all gay men does all of this, but the few who does is also the ones who yells "Discrimination" the loudest in the media. The Stereotypical Gay man.
As any other minority group there is a few who ruin it for the many.
even tho i don't live in the US myself I feel that i't would be "Easier" being gay in Europe, which is a shame really.
just the fact that the US have a really strong presence of the catholic church with over 80% of the country being Christians, people tend to have more Conservative views of things than eg. The UK.
Sorry for the rant people, it's just something i've been thinking about every time i see one of the "Being Gay" posts here on FJ.
anyhow just my two cents.
#188 to #178 - bibbity
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(02/20/2014) [-]
Agree wholeheartedly. The way I've always seen it is that, much like there's black people and there's *******, there's gay people and there's faggots. I have no problem with gay people, but faggots annoy the hell out of me.
User avatar #180 to #178 - feedtehtrollz
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/20/2014) [-]
This is completely true