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User avatar #5 - auryn
Reply +201 123456789123345869
(05/03/2014) [-]
stickied
Just to be sure, everyone from this generation should be forbidden to use the word literally, before the actual meaning completely bastardizes.

It might already be too late for that though.
User avatar #148 to #5 - meuk
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(05/04/2014) [-]
i fracking agree.
User avatar #135 to #5 - nimba
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(05/04/2014) [-]
"bastardizes"
lol
User avatar #129 to #5 - drackmore
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(05/04/2014) [-]
Just like people and the words lose and loose.
User avatar #123 to #5 - bananarchy
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(05/04/2014) [-]
Nope, you're wrong Literally - Merriam-Webster Ask the Editor
Stop being so pedantic
User avatar #116 to #5 - welfarekid
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(05/04/2014) [-]
Did you literally just say that?
User avatar #111 to #5 - arlaxis
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(05/04/2014) [-]
It's literally too late for that.
#101 to #5 - anon id: a3a87c45
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(05/04/2014) [-]
Literally everyone know's people use it to effect, i dont get why FJ gets whipped up into such a furious kid and puppy stabbing fury over people using it. Its beyond pathetic.
User avatar #97 to #5 - undeadmaus
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
It might be literally too late
User avatar #86 to #5 - kampi
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
My friend the other day reached the maximum level of ignorance when it comes to language when he said "... I'm, literally speaking, serious!"

I mean, just... Come on, Collie. You can do better.
(Yes, that's his nickname and no, he's not a furry (or a dog).)
User avatar #71 to #5 - sparkierlambs
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
User avatar #75 to #71 - tehlulzbringer
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(05/04/2014) [-]
why is it too late? it says using it in that manner is incorrect
User avatar #68 to #5 - vgmddg
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(05/04/2014) [-]
Literally - Merriam-Webster Ask the Editor
User avatar #54 to #5 - vigilum
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
"Oh no! The language is changing organically!"
User avatar #100 to #54 - auryn
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
Language changes, and language should change, but this isn't 'organic' change.

You don't realize that when a word at the same time can also mean the complete opposite it goes against the entire function of language, which is, to make ourselves clear, to be able to make the other understand what we mean.

In fact, if enough words could also mean the complete opposite, language would be meaningless, it would be futile.

I don't think you understand the sheer idiocracy of it.
User avatar #113 to #100 - blokrokker
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
Did you know that "awful" used to mean "full of awe" and was used as a synonym for "amazing" or "reverential"? But now it's a synonym for "terrible." Do you know how that happened? Because language evolves. It's not a rigid construct, it's a fluid and dynamic entity.
User avatar #170 to #113 - auryn
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
Yes, the same goes for 'terrific'. It can mean a really good thing, although it comes from "causing terror.
It doesn't make it any less moronic though, I stand by my point, why make language unnecessarily complex and confusing?

Language evolves, but it doesn't mean we should mindlessly agree to accept all changes, just because a group of people misuses the word out of ignorance.
User avatar #139 to #113 - herpderpstrom
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
same with "awesome", as in "God struck down his foes with awesome strength". Sample sentence from today: "You got two likes on your facebook picture? That's awesome!"
#46 to #5 - IGotThis
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
-ally
User avatar #45 to #5 - dancingdoggy
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
I believe it is too late. I heard that in the dictionary, the definition of "literally" has now expanded to include the idea of "figuratively."
Which, in my opinion, just kills the idea of the word, but what do I know?

Article: www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/13/literally-broken-english-language-definition
#43 to #5 - endospore
Reply +6 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
It's almost like people exaggerate to better emphasize their point. If only there was some word for that.

hyperbole
User avatar #34 to #5 - ScottP
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
It is literally too late
#29 to #5 - vatra
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
It's much too late for that man. Webster already changed the ******* definition to include figuratively as a secondary definition...
It's much too late for that man. Webster already changed the ******* definition to include figuratively as a secondary definition...
User avatar #130 to #29 - Tormound
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(05/04/2014) [-]
Except, literally has been used for "virtually" from at least the 1700s.
User avatar #175 to #130 - vatra
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
Which is stupid. The changing of the definition was just the nail in the coffin.
User avatar #125 to #29 - droghandel
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(05/04/2014) [-]
Mate, thats how language works. The stupidity on this website is literally sublime.
User avatar #174 to #125 - vatra
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(05/04/2014) [-]
Figuratively is the opposite of literary. Tell me how the **** it makes sense to say something means something and also the exact opposite.
User avatar #181 to #174 - droghandel
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/07/2014) [-]
It may not make sense to you, but much of language is inconsistent in which words swap meanings or loose meanings over time and it is just because it is the way that the humans on this planet use their words.
User avatar #22 to #5 - eezo
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(05/03/2014) [-]
That's literally the stupidest thing I've ever heard
User avatar #21 to #5 - nustix
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(05/03/2014) [-]
Words change of meaning, that the way it works I'm sorry for you. If they didn't we would still speak english like it's 1400 so I'm happy it changes.
#80 to #21 - anon id: 6af8c3a8
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(05/04/2014) [-]
But now literally is meaningless, it means what the oppposite of itself means aswell as its real meaning
User avatar #106 to #80 - nustix
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(05/04/2014) [-]
There's more words that mean it's opposite. There's even a word for words that means it's opposite.
#28 to #21 - guanyu
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
If it didn't, we could still read ancient texts.
#15 to #5 - somethingpants
Reply +22 123456789123345869
(05/03/2014) [-]
User avatar #131 to #15 - McFuckUp
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(05/04/2014) [-]
It's still overused. I once heard a girl on the phone say, "I'm like literally at the Mountainlair." Half the time it's used for emphasis, it's not even necessary.
#65 to #15 - mrjunebug
-5 123456789123345869
has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #117 to #65 - welfarekid
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
Thats how a language works.
#102 to #65 - theplogyr
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
Do you understand how language works, you ******* piece of ****? ****! There are no words to describe what brainless **** excuse for a human being you are. Get ******, you ******* fifth grade piece of ****.
User avatar #31 to #15 - zonicoi
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
*3rd grade English class*
"Billy, did you define 'Art' with the word art?"
"Yes, Miss."
"You can't do that, Billy. It's not allowed."
"Have you looked at the definition of 'literally' recently?"

what for some reason i immediately thought of when i saw this
User avatar #63 to #31 - toosexyforyou
Reply -3 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
"informal"

get ******
User avatar #64 to #63 - zonicoi
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
whoops literally skipped over that
User avatar #6 to #5 - applejuiceforme [OP]
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/03/2014) [-]
I feel like it has. Unfortunately.

I mean, it's not just this generation that is doing this. It's the older generations too.
User avatar #8 to #6 - auryn
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(05/03/2014) [-]
We're too late. I've just looked up "literally" in the dictionary.
Aparently these days one of the definitions also is: "Used for emphasis while not being literally true"

So now literally, instead of meaning the opposite of figuratively, can also mean figuratively.
Literally now means figuratively.

Madness.
#132 to #8 - Tormound
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
It's been used that way starting from at least the 1700s by quite a few writers, including Mark Twain.    
   
Heck if you guys are this worked up about words with opposite meanings, I wanna know how you feel about "clip" and "weather".
It's been used that way starting from at least the 1700s by quite a few writers, including Mark Twain.

Heck if you guys are this worked up about words with opposite meanings, I wanna know how you feel about "clip" and "weather".
User avatar #171 to #132 - auryn
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/04/2014) [-]
It's called a hyperbole, creating emphasis by exaggeration.

It shouldn't be absorbed in the definition, in my opinion.
User avatar #9 to #8 - applejuiceforme [OP]
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(05/03/2014) [-]
Well. Thank you for showing me this... I'm gonna go read a book where words still mean what they are supposed to mean now.

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For anyone wondering if he was telling the truth, he was.

Luckily, it's an informal definition, but the two definitions are opposites of each other now.